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Archive for December, 2008

29th Dec 2008

Vote For Art — Twitter’s Shorty Awards!

Art is officially running to become a recognized main category in Twitter’s Shorty Awards. I’m the campaign manager and instigator of the category.

Currently there are 24 major award categories, which include music, entertainment, finance, sports, tech travel, social media, photography and design (which includes, graphics, web design, fashion and crafts) —but no art. No art?!

We can remedy this. Shorty Award rules state that if many votes or nominations occur the new category will be listed as a major category.

A month ago I became active on Twitter ( http://twitter.com ), which is the social media site that anyone can join for free to send 140 character messages to people. On Twitter people are followed and also follow other people’s messages by choice. It is a wonderful and dynamic away to keep up with the people in your life and meet new friends. For me, it is the ideal chat room I never found anywhere else.

On Twitter I follow (and am followed) by artists, museums, galleries, collectors and lots of people who have no real connection to art.

As an artist, I see Twitter as a new form of the neighborhood café or tavern, where artists have congregated since they existed. Much like artists of the past, we socialize at the end, even during the day to discuss and show our art.

Art is a topic that appears in links to blogs sites from people not professionally associated with the art world. It is a fairly popular topic for social media gurus. In the past week, @chrisbrogan gave a guest spot on his well known blog to Amrita Chandra @tinkugallery; who wrote What Artists Can Teach Everyone About Social Media and @ariherzog blogged on How the Museum of Modern Art is Online .

About two weeks ago I began to notice messages that were sent to the people I follow that were much like this randomly selected one from last night:

@shortyawards @leavingrichmond , you were nominated by @Daniellelander (and 3 others) for a #music Shorty Award http://bit.ly/1Yg3

Since I had been active for less than a month and assumed these are yearly awards, I was content to watch from the sidelines. Although in that time I had staged Twitter’s first Post Conceptual Performance Art Event , blogged about it, received some press on it, plus blogged about Twitter with considerable participation both in the blog and later in commented from fellow Twitterers, I felt I was still a newbie.

Art However, when no one was nominated for art, I followed the link to awards to discover why. What immediately followed that was my Tweet: “@shortyawards there needs to be an #art category. Design is not fine art. You have music, entertainment– where’s art?”

While there was no response from the awards, @Reverse_Vampyr immediately nominated me for a Shorty Award for #art.

That’s when I learned that the Shorty Awards allow anyone on Twitter to nominate anyone else for any category. I was delighted that a category for #art was now established, no realizing that it still would not be included as a regular suggested category.

However, I felt that there were better candidates to nominate as major museums, art critics, galleries and artists are members of Twitter. Surely I was too new on Twitter. Yet I wanted more recognition for art, which meant more nominations.

I sent out re following Twitter message:” Please vote for me or nominate someone to the Shorty #art award. Free e book to all who do either! (DM me for link) Art is important!!”

Twitterers know that DM means direct message, a private way to send personal information. I could privately send a link a download site for my life transforming e book, The Art of Seeing The Divine, Book 1—What Do You See? It is brand new, and the giveaway supports my purposes of achieving recognition for art, while encouraging people discover the book.

I began to send out messages much like the one above. The Shorty Awards people saw one and decided that I was nominating myself, which was never my intent. I protested, but it stuck. I was hoping that another artist, arts writer, gallery or museum would pick up the banner and run. No one did.

What to do? Should I accept that once again fine art has been passed over as an important cultural force—which it absolutely is— or take action?

I have the credentials as an artist earn nominations. I am founding a radical new theory of art, Post Conceptual UnGraven Image, maintain an extensive web site for it, which includes artwork, articles (many reviews of shows and fairs, art theory, tips for collectors) and a free download of the manifesto booklet. Although I am still considered to be an emerging artist, my work is now with recognized dealers; has appeared in group and a solo show, plus, I have written for artnet.com and have received some press.

If I don’t take action, who will? If not now, when?

I am stepping up and tossing my beret into the ring for #art. I am asking to be nominated for #art and promise to stand up for art, artists and those who love or support them. If I win I fully intend to represent the artists, galleries, art writers, not for profit groups and great art museums that are on Twitter. It’s not about me – it’s about art and us. And, I have a plan on how to do this.

If I win a Shorty award for #art and am invited to the awards ceremony in NYC (I live within commuting range) I will attend. According to the rules, each winner will be allowed to make a 140 character acceptance speech. That’s where being an artist will allow me to represent my fellow artists and art people on Twitter: that 140 character acceptance speech moment.

One picture is worth a whole lot of 140 word speeches, but can be shown in the same amount of time as just one sound. So I intend to hold up, high enough so the cameras can film it, a Post Conceptual artwork that uses the logos, signatures, or faces of all of the artists, galleries, museums, non for profits and art writers who are on Twitter and send one (email) to me (with permission as this is all copyrighted material). Thus, visually we will all be represented. I intend to make this well known as it is free advertising for all fine art related Twitterers.

The Shorty Awards states that the ceremony will be filmed and played on the web. If I win I will also write a blog prior to the awards naming each person or group on the Post Conceptual “collage” fine art digital print that I hold up. Each person or group mentioned in that blog will also have a link back to their web site and their @name on Twitter mentioned in the blog.

I make and selling investment quality, limited edition fine art prints using a professional Epson in my own studio. Thus I have the equipment and software necessary to accomplish this. I am not sure what charity, but I think that the artwork could be auctioned or sold to benefit an arts charity, which could include one of the art not for profits on Twitter. I am open to suggestions for that after I win.

The nominations for the Shorty Awards closes midnight December 31 st . Please nominate me for #art.

If you are on Twitter, simply cut and paste this @shortyawards I nominate @judyrey in category #art because art is important.

Comments are welcome. Please ReTWeet and/or send the link to this post to others!

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art & Inspiration Comments 4 Comments »

22nd Dec 2008

’08 Holiday Greeting

Holiday Blessings

Ancient story synopsis: It’s a desperate time, but a miracle brings light into the world.

Update: Now we eat well, party, give gifts, gather the family and celebrate with lights on trees that are real, fake or symbolic.

Whatever you celebrate, wherever you are, I hope you are filled with the joy of the season, in the company of loved ones and inspired by a new vision of hope for the fulfillment of your heartfelt dreams.

P.S. —Festival of Lights ’06 is worth repeating

Light of Hope — Psalm 27

* * *
Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the limited and open edition prints in the estore.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey .]

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art & Inspiration Comments No Comments »

16th Dec 2008

Who Owns Art?

While ownership is clearly defined for most property, when it comes to fine art there are aspects of ownership that are unique, and even shared by people who lack any title to a work of art.

One aspect of this can quickly and easily be seen when it comes to artworks that are antiquities. While a person might purchase a work, removing that piece from its country of origin may not be permitted, or may be deemed socially unacceptable. It is said that the artwork belongs to the people of that country even though they do not own the title (meaning as in deeded right) to the work.

Then there is copyright ownership. While a collector may own the original work, the artist retains the copyright and can sell the right to make prints, use the image for advertising, on goods, or anyway else it can be franchised. The artist does not need to confer with the collector who owns the original. Yet the collector of the original may not legally even send photos of the work to friends and clients as a holiday card, without the artist’s agreement.

Even in a recession great and recognized art retains much of its prior value, making it a good investment. A van Gogh remains a van Gogh—and the same can be said for many of the masters. Yet, great art is always inevitably also free to all viewers.

Most gallery shows are free. Museums are often on a donation basis so those who cannot afford much can come in, or special times when admission is free. While images of great art are not the same as seeing a work up front and personally, there are wonderful art books for art lovers. Many of these books are readily available to see, or to take on loan from public libraries.

Money, buying power does not matter when it comes to viewing art. The viewing experience of a wealthy collector is as valid as a poor student’s. Each owns and takes away his own experience.

No one but the artist can actually ever own a work of art. A work can only be validly changed by the artist who created it. Clearly this is widely considered to be true since if anyone or anything else changes it, the work is said to be in need of restoration.

Collectors can only buy the right to decide where an artwork is located. Safe keeping of works is a position collectors pay to have. It is a position of deep, even sacred trust. Perhaps it is fitting that those people who have amassed wealth and property are entrusted with tending to the care of the artwork in their collection.


Cypresses , 1889

If the artwork becomes more valuable due to greater appreciation of the artist, the work and the economy then a collector may be rewarded by the work having increased in value. Selling a distinguished artwork means relinquishing a position of trust.

Each person “owns” their own experiences with art and specific artworks. My Experiences of van Gogh’s The Cypresses at The Metropolitan Museum are exceptionally meaningful to me. Experientially, I have a relationship to that painting that began when I was a girl. Yet I do not own the painting only my experiences of it. By the way, many of those experiences were given to me through the free admission I enjoyed as a student growing up in NYC.

Who can own art? Each person that is moved or inspired by art owns it in his or her own unique way.
* * *
Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the limited and open edition prints in the estore.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey .]

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art & Inspiration Comments 2 Comments »

10th Dec 2008

Is it Better to Follow or be Followed on Twitter?

On Twitter, which is it more important to follow others or be followed?

At the social networking site of Twitter, the question of whether it is more important to follow people or be followed is controversial. People try to look important by having a ratio of more followers that followers, just like the celebrities and Internet gurus on Twitter. But, does having more followers mean anything or predict success?

On Twitter messages known as Tweets are issued by members. Interesting or informative Tweets are forwarded. When someone with many followers RTs (Re Tweets) a comment, new people see it and a few decide the original person who made the comment is worth following. People also find others to follow through checking out who is following or being followed by others they know or would like to know, such as celebrities and the influencers.

Part of the conundrum is inherent in Twitters’ terminology of follow and followers. While this terminology is correct when understood in relationship to comments, it has an additional meaning in regards to leadership that does not necessarily pertain. Yet many, including Twitter’s own raking system, assume it does.

I used to write comedy professionally, and can be quick with a harmless quip. I have noticed that when I post something funny I pick up followers. Does this mean the people who enjoy my humor are actually ready to follow me into the real and new way of enhanced vision through Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art or through my inspirational self help e book, The Art of Seeing The Divine–Book 1 I doubt it, although who clicks on which links in Twitter comments is impossible to track.

If leadership means that people are eager to read what one writes or hear what one says then every journalist, correspondent, newscaster and TV host ought to be in the congress and run or run for some office. While these people may influence others, there is a difference between leadership and influence.

On Twitter one of the recognized Internet influencers is Guy Kawasaki, founding partner at Garage and co-founder of Alltop , a news aggregation site, author of business books and blogger. Kawasaki has followers who send tweets that link to popular or interesting articles on Alltop. These followers receive a free copy Kawasaki ‘s latest book, plus usually more flooders as their tweets are full of interesting links. Since Twitter limits the number of posts that one can make during the day, this scheme seems to work well.

Unlike many of the other Internet and business influencers, Guy Kawasaki follows many people. He is accessible to his followers through DMs (direct messages) while anyone else can reply to his frequent messages. He comments on other people’s Twits, rather than remaining aloof in his own celebrity guru niche. In a recent blog article, How to Use Twitter as a Twool advises Internet marketers to follow and relate to people other than the influencers like him. In my short experience on Twitter I have found Guy Kawasaki to actually be one of the most influential people on Twitter because he is busy interacting and listening.

Another Twitter influencer who seems to follow almost all of his followers is Wayne Sutton. I have witnessed him also interacting with his followers who tweet him. I recognized his name and began to follow him on what was probably my first day and to my surprise he immediately followed me back.

Historically great leaders are good listeners who have open lines of communication to as many of their “followers” as is possible. Leaders who have closed themselves off with their cronies and flatterers are toppled. They lack information about what is happening in their domain. The more information a person is privy too, especially when confirmed by many reliable sources, the wiser and proactive that person’s decisions and plans can be.

About two weeks ago, when I first joined Twitter, I signed on to follow everyone I could from influencers to “nobodies” who lacked a web site and Twittered within small family and friends groups. It was great fun finding someone who seemed especially interesting and then following many of the people that they followed. I made sure to follow English speaking people from around the world so that I would have a real purview of the news in the world outside of the media. Whether anyone would follow me was not half as interesting as what I could possibly learn. I also found as many artists and art related people as I could, including museums.

I kept selecting to follow people until Twitter stopped me at 2000. Twitter suspects that people who quickly sign on to follow many people are spammers. This seemed unfair and frustrating until I was followed by such a spammer. Eventually I will be allowed to follow more people after acquiring more followers and sending many messages. This indicates a level of participation that is unusual for spammers.

There is spirituality –connection– in each personal one on one tweet, no matter how seemingly trivial. That people assume or hope that someone cares that they are having lunch, home from running errand, listening to a favorite song, coming down with a cold or feeling happy or sad is disarmingly trusting and genuine. On the other hand, I have learned much from links I followed, had tastes of life around the world and had first hand updates fro people in Mumbai during the terrorist attack.

In the past two weeks I have commiserated with two people with headaches, one who had indigestion, another non-spammer who has also been barred from following more people until she has more followers, been cheered on by new friends, had questions answered and answered some, found interesting blogs, posted at some, been featured in blogs about my work creating Twitter’s first Post Conceptual Performance Art, been inspired to create a new painting and best of all made new friends.

On the day this article was written I sent out a tweet that asked if it is better to follow or be followed on Twitter. Why. I let it be known that I would use the best replies and include the IDs of those selected. In the Twitter community having one’s ID broadcast and promoted means one gets more followers and friends.

The answers are diverse. I decided to use them all as having the freedom to express and see many thoughts and opinions are what makes Twitter unique, vital and splendid.

Twitter allows 140 spaces each update, which means many are written with texting abbreviations or code. They are basically just cut and pasted in the order they were received.

“If we all follow, then we are all followed!– thehotiron

“Following but not being followed is like unrequited love or stalking, depending. Best case is to follow and be followed.”– edgizmo

“Depends. Personally, I’d rather follow the funny/insightful/interesting posts of others. My updates are pretty bland sometimes.”– missmarsh

“Depends on if you want to put on or follow the show…” — GRAIN4YOURBRAIN

“Better to be even steven… otherwise you get complaints… got some real stick n the muds here” — FiveDecades

“ For me depends on what yr lking for. Ppl with stuff to sell will want lots of followers for marketing push. I follow fewer than follow me b/c I value conversation…”– robynmcintyre

“It is better to be followed – so your voice is heard.”– ConchRaider

“Got to follow & be followed IMO. Twitter is a conversation and talking to yourself is the 1st sign of madness :)”– CanDoCanBe

“I have always been a big fan of Lead rather than be led :D”– artbyskym

“It is better to follow, listen, learn from others, and reply when relevant. Result: Ntwrk growth (followers) happen automatically”– jenuinejen

“Its better for my ego when I get followed. But I tweet A LOT so I get followed a lot. When I see someone interesting I follow first”– ImSleepDeprived

“Re Twitter: Better to follow or be followed? Sounds like The Tao of Twitter : )”– realtortweet

“I think both – of course depends upon your use of Twitter; if business, follow and be followed”– LindaCSmith

“You follow and be followed -this is about building relationships – every person comes in ur life for a season, a reason or lifetime… there are of course exceptions to every rule – bottomline is you follow someone if your heart and gut says its the right thing”– scenic_drive

Neither. Both. Depends on what you are trying to get out of Twitter”.– purplepopple

This week in my email was a notification that Jack Canfield, of bestselling author of Chicken Soup for the Soul and The Secret, is following me. Wow! Jack Canfield is one of my spiritual contemporary heroes. I logged into Twitter where many tweets indicated that he had just become a member. Since I actually do have an inspirational and unique way to visually transform lives, which compliments Mr. Canfield’s work it would make sense for us to follow each other. Except, I am really just emerging, how he or a staff member found and selected me to follow delights and amazes me.

I immediately followed Jack Canfield right back. I follow all of my followers. I joke that I seem to be following me, since everywhere I go I find me. Thus I have something in common with anyone else who follows me.

The thing about Jack Canfield is that he immediately followed his entire initial allotment of 2000 people. I suspect he would have followed everyone on Twitter if it was allowed. He left one post, and now, I believe he is wisely watching, listening and learning.

It has been asked, “Who is wise?”

The answer, which was part of the Jewish oral tradition known to Jesus and the disciples is, “The person who can learn from anyone is wise.”

Please add your comments and leave your Twitter ID at the bottom if you want.

* * *
Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the limited and open edition prints in the estore.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey .]

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Theory and Show Reviews Comments 35 Comments »

05th Dec 2008

Hampton Galleries Expand into Fairs and NYC

Despite the difficult financial times we live in, Hamptons based galleries are bullishly moving into the international art scene. This new trend involves participating in international fairs and opening branches in Manhattan.

This year two galleries will have booths at Scope Miami, another dealer partners in a booth to raise funds for a charity, as other dealers, artists and collectors from the Hamptons head to the fairs.

The Keszler Gallery of Southampton’s booth at Scope Miami is a direct result of their success as one of the top selling galleries at Scope Hamptons this summer.

One of the hits of the summer season for the gallery was a live show by artist Russell Young who created large silkscreens of the famous and infamous using his own blood as ink. This performance will be repeated in two shows in the Keszler Gallery booth, both scheduled for 2 PM, the first privately for the press and VIP reception and the second on Saturday, December 6, 2008.

The Silas Marder Gallery of Bridgehampton also has a booth at Scope Miami. This is a first move out of the Hamptons for this gallery that features young local artists.

The McNeill Art Group is partnering with non-profit organization RxArt at the Red Dot Fair in Miami. Their booth will include an interactive installation created by local artists Jeff Muhs and Tapp Francke.

Also at the fairs this year is gallerist Peter Marcelle of the Hamptons Road Gallery and Peter Marcelle Contemporary. Peter’s gallery was one of the top selling galleries at the ArtHamptons. Is Peter scouting out fairs to participate in next year or looking for art for his collection?

The Charles Cowles Gallery is located in Chelsea, not the Hamptons. However,  the splendid gift of the Charles Cowles Collection of photography to the Parrish Museum certainly establishes the gallerist’s footprint in the Hamptons, beyond his ongoing generous support of arts groups here. The Charles Cowles gallery will be retuning to Pulse Miami this year.

Last year, Glenn Horowitz Bookseller took the unprecedented and bold step of opening the John McWinnie@Glenn Horowitz Bookseller Gallery in Manhattan. Prior to that galleries such as Mark Borghi and Spanierman opened branches here, or Hamptons gallerists used their apartments in the city as private places to show work to their collectors.

Keszler gallery is the first Hamptons based gallery to show and represent contemporary art at international fairs and open a branch in Manhattan. Late October, over 250 guests celebrated the opening of the new gallery space on the Upper East Side , which included works by gallery artists David Gamble and Russell Young, plus works by the artist known as Banksy. The Keszler Gallery has the largest collection of works by Bansky in the USA.

Stephan Keszler says, “We love to work with our artists. Our prices are more affordable so we are positive that we will do well.” This optimism founded in continuing success even in difficult times, has Keszler moving forward by “…increasing our engagement as a dealer in the USA and world wide.”

* * *
Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the limited and open edition prints in the estore.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey .]

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art Theory and Show Reviews Comments 2 Comments »

03rd Dec 2008

Twitter’s First Post Conceptual Performance Art Success

Twitter’s first Post Conceptual Performance Art Event by artist Judy Rey Wasserman on Tuesday, December 2, 2008, was groundbreaking. Actually creating a temporary art event where people the world over could watch all at the same time and then through the same identical media immediately respond is a new use for social media and technology.

The Post Conceptual Performance on Twitter was strongly linked to an article that was published on the day of the performance on Post Conceptual UnGraven Image’s Art & Inspiration blog. Judy Rey Wasserman is the founding artist of Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art Theory and the author of the manifesto booklet available as a free download through the web site.

While millions of people may tune into an internet or TV or radio broadcast, their immediate ability to communicate their response via the same visual medium is limited. On Twitter, any viewer can join in with a reply almost immediately, which broadens and enriches the collective event and experience.

On the day before the event notice and invitation was Twittered several times and announced on Facebook. Here is an example of an early Tweet:“Pass it on: Tues., Dec 2 at 4:35 EST Rembrandt (Psalm 22) becomes Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) Here. Live. Only on Twitter 9:29 PM Dec 1st

The day of the event the invitations included a link to her newly posted article. Judy Rey’s followers who she knew personally, were in the art world or interested in uses of social media were privately emailed through Twitter.

“Twitter can be seen as a canvas shared by a whole community,” says Judy Rey Wasserman. “Just as each viewer sees a work of art differently, each member of Twitter follows a different group of people and logs in at different moments. Each person’s Twitter experience is unique and impossible to repeat as the twits are transitory and ever changing.”

Social media sites such as Twitter, where people meet to share ideas and collaborate, offer goods and services, and socialize are fast becoming the piazzas or town squares of the world. Historically, communities have always placed art in their social and commerce centers.

This enhances the immediacy of interaction between artist and viewer, plus allows for viewer to viewer interaction on a world wide basis. This interaction is a part of the artistic event.

The event itself, as reported in an Comments Article at Art Fag City by Paddy Johnson, involved simply exchanging one avatar (one of Vincent van Gogh for another (Rembrandt). However, as Paddy Johnson sagely noted the information contained in Judy Rey’s article about the event, including the immediacy of interaction and response is what made the event pertinent and unique.

Judy Rey’s act of exchanging her avatar of Rembrandt created with strokes that are the original letters of Psalm 22 for one of Vincent van Gogh created with symbol-strokes from the text of Psalm 113 has significance in art history. From his early works it is evident that van Gogh was influenced by the work of the earlier Dutch Painter. Rembrandt’s religious ideas, although controversial in his time were more accepted by the time young Vincent was growing up listening to his father’s sermons. Vincent van Gogh became an evangelist for a while, followed Rembrandt’s concern for the poor, and made his first remarkable painting is The Potato Eaters, where Rembrandt’s influence is clearly seen. Both artists considered themselves to be religious painters.

In less than two weeks of active participation on Twitter, Judy Rey had drawn a following that was just over 475 people. Only a portion of these people could or would be online and logged into Twitter factors into how to judge the success of this first event. The number grew to over 500 within two hours of the event.

“I  seem to follow myself as I find me wherever I do. So I follow all of my followers as at least t we have following me in common,” says Judy Rey. Anyone with a Twitter account can follow her at http://twitter.com/judyrey

The artistic and spiritual roots Judy Rey Wasserman’s idea for the event stems from the sand paintings of the Buddhists and Navajo artists. Recently, The Parrish Art Museum, in Judy Rey’s town of Southampton, NY, presented a sand painting event by Buddhist monks. These paintings are created as temporary experience where the making of the work is as significant as the work itself.

Twitter, where the messaging and interactions are instantaneous but transient and shared by a community, is an online replication of a gathering place where Performance Art or the making of a sand painting fits right in.

One of the lessons learned from the event is that Twitter’s coding automatically edits former Twit comments changing newer avatars for older ones. This adds to the transient nature of the performance, as the record of the previous avatar is missing from its previous posts with the new one substituted. History is revised by code.

This is best shown in the screen capture in another article written by Hrag Vartanian, Performing on Twitter . This screen capture also shows the presence of Barry Hoggard on Twitter at that time. Hoggard also writes on art.

Other visual artists who follow “judyrey” were leaving posts advertising their work both before and after the Judy Rey Wasserman’s first Post Conceptual Performance Art Event on Twitter. For Judy Rey this is all a part of the event and  is appreciated, even encouraged.

Will there be more art events on Twitter? “Absolutely! Power is in the group – in us. Social media provides artists with new and unique ways to reach and inspire others. While a person might be able to afford to collect art by an artist represented by a top tier gallery, anyone can experience art events and communication with artists through the Internet. I intend to continue to explore how we can interact and use social media, including in an inspirational way.”

“Art is personal. Even in a crowded blockbuster exhibit, such as ‘Van Gogh and the Colors of the Night,’ which is currently at MoMA, the connection from artist to viewer, even in a crowded space is always personal, unique and therefore spiritual,” said Judy Rey Wasserman. “My purpose is to actually transform lives by changing how we see the world. So everyone who sees my work is special to me.”

* * *
Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.

Check out the limited and open edition prints in the estore.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey .]

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art Theory and Show Reviews Comments 3 Comments »

02nd Dec 2008

Twitter’s First Post Conceptual Performance Art Event

Twitter will have its first Post Conceptual Performance Art Show on Tuesday, December 2, 2008, thanks to Judy Rey Wasserman, artist and founder of Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory.

All Twitter users are invited to watch as Rembrandt (Psalm 22) turns into Vincent Van Gogh (Psalm 133) at 4:35 PM EST at http://twitter.com/judyrey .

This is an innovative web event. Actually creating a temporary art event where people the world over can watch all at the same time and then through the same identical media immediately respond is groundbreaking in concept.

While millions of people may tune into an internet or TV or radio broadcast, their immediate ability to communicate their response via the same visual medium is limited. On Twitter, any viewer can join in with a reply almost immediately, which broadens and enriches the collective event and experience.

“It is as if the canvas is shared by the community,” says Judy Rey Wasserman. “This enhances the immediacy of interaction between artist and viewer, plus allows for viewer to viewer interaction on a world wide basis. This interaction is a part of the artistic event.”

Social media sites such as Twitter, where people meet to share ideas and collaborate, offer goods and services, and socialize are fast becoming the piazzas or town squares of the world. Historically, communities have always placed art in their social and commerce centers.

Artists are using social media to promote their work on sites such Etsy and Saatchi Online, joining in discussions and groups at ArtReview, Art Mesh, Facebook and My Space, and through blogs and their comments staging immediate and artistic shows and events is new for non-art sites.

The artistic and spiritual roots Judy Rey Wasserman’s idea is in the sand paintings of the Buddhists and Navajo artists. Recently, The Parrish Art Museum, in Judy Rey’s town of Southampton , NY, presented a sand painting event by Buddhist monks. These paintings are created as temporary experience where the making of the work is as significant as the work itself.

Twitter, where the messaging and interactions are instantaneous but temporary and shared by a community, is an online replication of a gathering place where Performance Art or the making of a sand painting fits right in.

Since this is Post Conceptual art, the meaning is intrinsic in the strokes, the actions of the event. Thus the influence of Rembrant’s that can easily be seen in van Gogh’s earlier works, and then his portraits and often troubled self portraits is referenced by the successtion of the artistic images.

And the significance of the time? It is five minutes after the Wall Street’s stock market closes. "Whatever happens in the financial sector, five minutes later, I want to focus on two great religious artists, on the spiritual and universal connection that we have. As an artist founding the first religious, inclusive and science-based theory of art, it is part of my work to present a greater vision that we can all share."

“Art is personal. Even in a crowded blockbuster exhibit, such as ‘V an Gogh and the Colors of the Night,’ which is currently at MoMA, the connection from artist to viewer, even in a crowded space is always personal, unique and therefore spiritual,” said Judy Rey Wasserman. “My purpose is to actually transform lives by changing how we see the world. So everyone who sees my work is special to me.”

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the limited and open edition prints in the estore.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey .]

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