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Archive for November, 2012

28th Nov 2012

What Art Would You Invest in with $5 million?

“If you had $5 million of cash you wanted to invest in artworks, what artists would you try to acquire?”, tweeted @ArtTactic, on November 26, 2012.

This Twitter account represents ArtTactic.com, which is a website that reports on art market news and analysis. Their tweets represent the website, often sharing a link to an article or reports. So, the majority of their followers are interested in the art market, and many are artists.

I’m @judyrey, also an artist. I quickly ReTweeted this great question, hoping to add to @ArtTactic‘s responses. What would others buy if they could, and why? Prompted by mu urging (as I was going to blog on the results), @arttactic tweet a new version of the next day, and then RT’d them again.

Including me, thirty-five people answered the question. According to their Twitter bios, the overwhelming majority of  are artists.

@ArtTactic retweeted (RT) all of the tweets, which helped me to count them, gather the data, and capture part of their Twitter stream for the image below. You can still answer the question by adding a comment below.

It is a boon for investors culling over this material that the answers are coming from artists here, not advisers or dealers, because genuine information from from this group is rare. Artists are not thought of as authorities on the art market — it is not their role.

Yet, artists who are revered or inspire many the next generation artists often end up as the next blue chip artists, so discovering who is influencing or revered by emerging artists is helpful investing  information. The current exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Regarding Warhol Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, attests to the importance of an artist’s influence. In case you have not been watching the recent art auctions, the prices of Warhol’s paintings continue to rise, making him one of the most expensive artists to collect.

Personally, I would have tweeted that I would buy a Warhol painting, if I wasn’t certain that $5 million would fail to bring one home to me.

So instead I Tweeted Johns, Kiefer and if I could also swing it a Twombly, even knowing that a significant Johns with numbers would wipe out my entire budget, if I was lucky enough to get a deal. I would need to acquire smaller works from each of these artists, if I collected all three with my $5 million.

Richter and Twombly tied for first place, with three mentions each. Second place, with two votes each, is a three way split between Kiefer, Koons and Lichtenstein.

Clearly some of the responses came from people who had no idea of what art by various artists, such as Monet, would really cost, or were not focused on what artists would be a good investment. Yet, no one mentioned Hirst, whose market is reported variously in the art news sources to have notably fallen from a peak prior to the recession. Of course, the prices for many mid-career artists fell at that time and have failed to fully recover, but Hirst is the one who is most above the radar. Yet, unlike Hirst, second place winners Koons, Kiefer and Twombly, who are all also represented by the Gagosian Gallery (@Gagosian), have seen prices for their works rise at auction.

Only one person thought of commissioning a work, Leonor Leite (@LeonorLeiteM), “With $5 million I would commission my own portrait by John Currin, (@BelmaczMayfair) would $5M be enough money? #Cheers”
kj @kjoftherock tweeted, “Any Modigliani, first. Van Gogh letter sketches next. Esp. Girl Near Stove Grinding Coffee.”

Since Vincent van Gogh always is my favorite artist and greatest artistic influence (his ideas) I would happily follow and revise my original idea, except I am not sure of the idea as a good investment. A safe investment for sure! But, will a sketch in a letter by van Gogh rise proportionately the way I believe a work by Jasper Johns will?

Below is a screenshot of the later Tweets. You can add your ideas in the comments.

If you had $5 million of cash you wanted to invest in artworks, what artists would you try to acquire?”

Note: A special thanks to Adam Green, who tweets for @ArtTactic and originated the tweet and by RTing the replies helped my gain the data for this blog.


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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey .(<–Click)

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20th Nov 2012

Thanksgiving Blessings

On the first Thanksgiving the settlers who had endured so much, but triumphantly survived, and even had a harvest (with much help from their neighbors, the Native Americans), gave thanks with a communal meal.

We give thanks when we are grateful—when we feel blessed.

A person does not need to be religious, even spiritual to feel blessed, as most blessings we receive come from or through the actions and gifts of other people.

The Pilgrims were blessed by the Native Americans. That the settlers felt grateful to their neighbors is clearly seen by their communal meal of Thanksgiving.  No doubt the Pilgrims gave thanks to their God for the help of the native Americans.

This year, many Americans are a new kind of settler, “the displaced”. These Americans are far from their former homes not by choice but due to disasters, such as hurricane Sandy or by economic difficulties caused by economic conditions largely brought on by a handful of banks (not all banks!) through fraudulent or at least immoral acts.

We always can choose whether or not we will be a blessing to others, our neighbors on this earth by sharing what we have, our financial prosperity, our knowledge, or our encouragement and care We get to choose whether we will be grateful or feel entitled to what we have—and even what we do not have (or really need).

In the Bible, the Hebrew word “Ashar” (Hebrew word Ashar ), is sometimes translated as blessed, and in another variation, to be called happy. This is found in Genesis 30:13, Psalms 41:2 and 72:17, Malachi 3:12 and also Proverbs 31:28.

Fall Tree AlephBy Judy Rey WassermanStrokes: Deuteronomy Chapter 6See a larger image via link on the PRINT page CLICK HERE
Woman of Valor Rosebud by Judy Rey WassermanWoman of Valor Rosebud By Judy Rey Wasserman Strokes: Deuteronomy Chapter 6 See a larger image via link on the PRINT page CLICK HERE

My favorite is the one from Proverbs, which is also from  verses 31:10-31, known as the “Woman of Valor”. The KJV Bible version of Proverbs 31:28 says. Her children rise up, and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her.”

The word “blessed” here also means happy, the kind of happy that comes from gratitude.

This year as we gather with our loved ones, friends and communities, let us decide to focus for the next year of being grateful and enjoy the happiness that comes from that thankfulness. And let us also decide to be a blessing to others in need.

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true?  See for yourself. See more. Read:  In the Beginning

To download a free copy of In the Beginning as an ebook in PDF format simply click: DOWNLOAD. The PDF will open in another widow and you then save it to your disk. Offer ends June 9, 2014

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.

Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.

Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

If you wish to have an advantage and to know exactly when the campaign goes live so you have first choice of the rewards that are for originals or limited editions,and get a copy of the free e book, you can use this link to sign up for the revamped free newsletter:
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14th Nov 2012

American Art Dealers Association Offers Galleries Hurricane Sandy Relief

Art Dealers Association has stepped up to help art dealers (both members and non-members) and related enterprises aid from their losses due to hurricane Sandy. This relief is in the form of monetary grants, assistance from art related individuals, such as attorneys and conservators, panel discussions to address urgently needed information and a website page that is chock full of resources that can also offer assistance and information.

In other words, the major, and generally the most successful galleries in New York are generously helping to keep their competition in business.  Some of these galleries are even offering space to other galleries who are struggling with spaces that are so damaged by Sandy that they may be unusable and closed for months.

This puts “Love thy neighbor” in action, as, in fact, many of the ADAA galleries are neighbors of smaller, often newer galleries in Chelsea and the emerging competition.

Last week, the ADAA announced a $250,000 fund to help hurricane flooded galleries get back into action, and within 24 hours two donations of $50,000 came from gallerist David Zwirner and the current President of the ADAA, LucyMitchell-Innes Nash. On Tuesday, the association announced that Art Basel, the Swiss organization that runs contemporary art fairs in Basel, Miami Beach and Hong Kong, had donated $50,000 as well. All told, the
association’s initial fund has nearly doubled, and donations are welcomed from anyone.

According to Linda Blumberg, executive director of the ADAA, in the first week that ended last Friday November 9, they gave grants to Derek Eller, Printed Matter, Wallspace and Bortolami Gallery. 

This upcoming Friday at least ten other grants will be awarded, with more to come on a weekly basis.

“I think the thing that has been most remarkable has been the willingness of the community to come together,” said Blumberg. “Dealers have been exceedingly generous to their colleagues who are not as adversely affected by the storm.”

Also last Friday, Mitchell Innes and Nash gallery hosted a free ADAA Insurance Claims Information Session for galleries that included presentations from lawyers and insurance experts, who also personally answered questions.

The David Zwirner gallery has also stepped up to use their social media klout on Facebook and Twitter to post links to information that is helpful to galleries and artists, plus information is also posted on their website news page.  Yet, the David Zwirner gallery itself is in the process of renovations to damages by Sandy, and will only reopened one gallery location on November 9.

As reported in ArtForum, David Zwirner said, “We are grateful that our gallery has the resources to recover swiftly from the storm, but we recognize that some of our valued colleagues are in vulnerable positions. The relief fund will help galleries to restore their spaces and continue their vital contributions to the art community.”

Just as this blog was about to be posted, the Paul Kasmin Gallery, an ADAA member, and Artspace announced that they have partnered to raise funds for the ADAA Relief Fund.  The Paul Kasmin will produce a limited edition print based on artist William N. Copley’s work, Think (Flag) 1972, in collaboration with ADAA member Pace Prints and the William N. Copley Estate. The benefit print will be sold on Artspace.com, for $200 each with 100% of proceeds going toward the ADAA Relief Fund. In addition, Artspace.com has created a Hurricane Sandy Relief collection of artworks to benefit the ADAA Relief Fund with 10% of all sale proceeds of the collection, through December 31, 2012.

Think (Flag) 1972 by William N. Copley

 

Think (Flag) 1972 by William N. Copley

A Hurricane Sandy Relief party will be held on Friday, November 16th to benefit the ADAA Relief Fund, hosted by Paul Kasmin Gallery, Artspace.com, and Hotel Americano. Benefit partners include The Aesthete, Art Production Fund, Billy Farrell Agency, FAIR, FITZ & CO, Pace Prints, PK SHOP, and the William N. Copley Estate/CPLY LLC.  The benefit committee is still in formation, it currently includes other ADAA members, James Cohan (James Cohan Gallery) and Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn (Salon 94), plus artists, art writers, non-profits, art advisors, designers and other galleries, several that are currently closed for renovations.

“It’s an important time to gather together and help our friends and colleagues. The ADAA had done a fantastic job of responding quickly and efficiently to those in need and we’re happy to be able to contribute to the cause, ” said Paul Kasmin.

The contributions that the galleries make have earned New York City its reigning title as the “Center of the Art World.”
While various other cities, such as London, Paris and Rome also boast great museums and public art, the city with
the most galleries offering collectors both new Contemporary and secondary market art is New York, and the majority of the galleries are in Chelsea. This means jobs, not only for the people who work in the galleries and service the art
industry, but for cab drivers, restaurants, hotels, etc., which provide goods and services to the collectors and tourists who attend the gallery shows and fairs, plus of course, tax revenues for the City

Many of Chelsea’s galleries were not insured or fully insured for these catastrophic losses. Few had flood insurance as
nothing like the coastal surge such as the waters from mega storm Sandy was experienced within recorded history. Axa Art an insurer that underwrites more than $1 billion of art for 66 galleries in Chelsea, has already received $40
million in claims from Hurricane Sandy. Newer, younger and less established or less established galleries were often already struggling to promote emerging or new artists in a difficult economy. Many millions of dollars of art were damaged or lost that were not insured or adequately insured, leaving galleries and possibly artists to deal with the losses.

Prior to hurricane Sandy, it was considered a prestigious for a gallery to be accepted for membership in ADAA, plus it offers members the added benefit of participating in its annual successful The Art Show, plus events helpful to members and collectors.  The outpouring from the  members shows that the privilege now includes unprecedented
service to the art community.

“I really feel confident that the community is going to get back on its feet,” Linda Blumberg.

To donate to the ADAA Relief Fund providing grants and loans for member and non-member galleries and nonprofit institutions to rebuild art spaces after the catastrophic damage wrought by Hurricane Sandy please
visit PayPal  (most charge cards accepted) https://www.paypal.com/cgibin/webscr?cmd=_sxclickhosted_button_id=SMSKCSEUPRYXC

Want to donate by check to the ADAA’s Relief fund?  Please make check out to: ADAA Relief Fund; Send to: Art Dealers Association of America, 205 Lexington Avenue Suite 901, New York, NY 10016, Attention : Patricia Brundage

You can also donate via Wiring/ACH/Direct Deposit. Instructions: Wire to: First Republic Bank 1230 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020, account’s ABA/Routing No.: 321081669 Credit Account No.:80001307553 Account Name:  Art Dealers Association of America Inc.

The ADAA Relief Fund provides grants and loans for member and non-member galleries and nonprofit institutions to rebuild art spaces after the catastrophic damage wrought by Hurricane Sandy. Recipient galleries are identified and prioritized by need and application form is available here.

For ADAA’s extensive listing of relief resources for Galleries (and often artists too) see: http://www.artdealers.org/sandyreliefresources.html

For further information about the benefit event and art sale see; Paul Kasmin Gallery.

William N. Copley print used courtesy of the Paul Kasmin Gallery.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: estore.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey .(<–Click)

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02nd Nov 2012

Mark Rothko Basic Essence Portrait

“Pictures must be miraculous.” — Mark Rothkos

This Basic Essence Portrait portrait of Mark Rothko is created with strokes that are the original Torah font letters of Psalm 101 and Ecclesiastes ch 1 and 2.

Mark Rothko’s work beguiled and confused and deeply effected me as a school girl and then college student studying art. I did not understand Abstract expressionism, or much like it. I wanted to dismiss it as art.

I wanted to move from move from DaDa, Expressionism, Surrealism, Cubism to Pop, ignoring the Abstract Espressionists, although I could admit that I did comprehend some worth in Pollack, Kline and Martin. But Rothko’s works kept tripping me up, grabbing me as I strove to walk past his large paintings and decimating all my theories and ideas about art.

This is because Rothko can always connect with me emotionally and has reduced me to tears, which as a girl I was embarrassed to show.

I see, but do not intellectually understand it, that Rothko paints raw emotion. Like Vincent van Gogh, who painted non-religious subjects but considered himself to be a religious or spiritual artist, Rothko showed me that narrative is not what makes a work of art depict the Divine.

For me, Rothko is one of the greatest religious artists who ever lived.I have not yet been to the Rothko Chapel, but it is on my bucket list.

Looking at Rothko’s sublime paintings, feeling depths of emotions I lost the need for the subject matter, the narrative image, to be what is most important about a work of art. I could never have developed a theory of art that asserts that the meaning of a painting is in its strokes without this lesson.

So as I work my way through my first series of Essence Portraits of artists who have influenced my art, and who I greatly admire, the seventh is Mark Rothko.

Portrait of Mark Rothko by Judy Rey Wasserman strokes are psalm 101 and Ecclesiastes 1 & 2

Mark Rothko basic Essence Portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman created with strokes that are the original Torah font letters of Psalm 101 and Ecclesiastes ch 1 and 2.

“Art to me is an anecdote of the spirit, and the only means of making concrete the purpose of its varied quickness and stillness.” — Mark Rothko

* * *
Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: estore.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey .(<–Click)

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