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Archive for March, 2013

25th Mar 2013

Lamb of Joy

One of the joys of spring is breaking forth of resurrected and new life.

Resurrected life can be seen in the buds and flowers on trees, flowers from perennial bulbs that come back year after year. New life can be seen in the lambs, the chirping of new chicks in the trees, and, where I live, dandelions and early greens. Flowers, eggs and lambs are also symbols of the spring religious holidays of the Jews and Christians, Passover and Easter.

Jews celebrate their rebirth as a free people (comprised of  twelve related tribes), and the many miracles and lessons of their journey of delivery from slavery in Egypt. The final of the twelve miracles that were endured by the Egyptians, was the death of all the firstborn sons — a fate the Hebrews were spared by following the Lord’s instruction given by Moses to smear the blood of a lamb over the doorposts of their homes, and then to enjoy a special dinner and night together, the first Passover seder, inviting as many people as were necessary to fully consume the lamb.  Pharaoh then agrees to let Moses’ people, all slaves in Egypt, go free and out of that freedom, wandering out in the desert, the Bible and what becomes Judaism as a religion is born.

Christians celebrate the resurrection of Jesus son of Joseph of Nazareth. In the New Testament, Jesus is called the Lamb of God by John the Baptist.  Jesus’ resurrection brings the birth of Christianity.

This new basic Essence Portrait of a lamb below is created of strokes that are the original Torah font (Bible font) letters from the texts: Jeremiah 3:1-8, and Isaiah 53:6-7.

 

Lamb by Judy Rey Wasserman using letters from Bible texts for strokes

Lamb of Joy (Jeremiah 13:1-8, Isaiah 53:6-7) by Judy Rey Wasserman

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Get a copy of the currently free prior to and during an upcoming crowd funding campaign e book: In the Beginning via the right hand column on this page or via http://artofseeingthedivine.com/booklet.htm.

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15th Mar 2013

Peggy Guggenheim — Woman of Valor Portrait

As an heiress and member of the Guggenheim family, Peggy Guggenheim ((August 26, 1898 – December 23, 1979 ) was a socialite with many also famous friends, many of whom were artists and writers.

Selecting the text(s) that I will use to create a portrait can take as long, or almost as long as creating the basic black and white Essence Portrait. I do a lot of research on every subject, including interviews when possible. Then, based on that information, based on those understandings,  I do more research using a Concordance, looking up keywords and researching texts. Every now and then I just “know” what text to use, because I am somewhat familiar with the Bible and it seems obvious.

The choice of text for my new Essence Portrait of  Peggy Guggenheim was immediately clear and obvious to me: Proverbs 31, also known as Woman of Valor.

Peggy Guggenheim is known for being a great art collector and generous public benefactor. However, as an artist, I appreciate her as having been more than a great collector, she was a woman who discovered and championed great artists. I has been said that we might not have had Abstract Expressionism without her support for the artists. This makes her more than a collector, she was an important patron and benefactor of artists.

Peggy Guggenheim by Judy Rey Wasserman - strokes are Proverbs 31

Peggy Guggenheim – Proverbs 31 by Judy Rey Wasserman

A great deal has been written about Peggy Guggenheim, and even by her in her autobiography, about her life, her adventures as an art collector and gallery owner, her relationships with artists and writers, and her many marriages and loves.

As a young woman, on a self-selected art tour to see more art, she journeyed from her native New York City Western Europe, where she met just about every influential artist at that time, including Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Mondrian, Leger, Henry Moore, Hans Arp, Brancusi, Alexander Calder and Anton Pevsner, Jean Cocteau, and Max Ernst, who she was married to for a couple of years.

Her interest in collecting art and friendships led her to open a gallery in London where she could show the works of her friends. She gave Wassily Kandinsky his first-ever London show, and followed that with  an exhibition of contemporary sculpture featuring works of Henry Moore, Hans Arp, Brancusi, Alexander Calder and Anton Pevsner.

After Hitler invaded Paris, she abandoned her idea of opening a museum in London dedicated to a collection of works by Modern Art, and returned to New York City.

In October 1942, her museum-gallery, Art of This Century, opened in Manhattan, exhibiting all her Cubist, Abstract and Surrealist acquisitions. She showed the works of leading European artists (many mentioned above) in her gallery, but also met and showed the works of the new, and unknown, American Abstract Expressionists, including Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko, Janet Sobel, and Clyford. Most importantly she is credited with discovering (she had a good eye!), arranging for the first show (s) and also championing the work of Jackson Pollack.

Peggy Guggenheim by Judy Rey Wasserman - strokes are Proverbs 31

Close up of portion of Peggy Guggenheim – Proverbs 31 by Judy Rey Wasserman

(Can you spot some of the Torah font Hebrew letters used? Apart from the clear and obvious ones, you can spot some of the letters that are used as strokes, especially heys, vavs and yuds, which are often used near eyes of my subjects.)


Despite Peggy Guggenheim’s two brief, but very influential stints as an art dealer, her galleries really existed to showcase the art she loved, and had purchased, rather than as business venture aimed at making money. After the war, she returned to Europe in 1948 when her collection was exhibited at the Venice Biennale, introducing Pollock, Rothko and Arshile Gorky to Europe, alongside her works of previous Modern movements and artists, such as the Cubists and Surrealists.

Her collection continued to grow. It toured  across Europe, and was shown in Florence, Milan, Amsterdam, Brussels and Zurich.

By 1951 she had purchased and resided in the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni on the Grand Canal., where he collection then resided. She began a tradition of opening her collection and home to the general public every summer.  She left her collection and the palace to the Solomon Guggenheim Foundation. It is one of the must go-to art destinations in Venice, and the world.

A great deal has been written about Peggy Guggenheim, and even by her in her autobiography, about her life, her adventures as an art collector and gallery owner, her relationships with artists and writers, and her many marriages and loves. Reading about her life is an interesting way to discover more about the history of Modern Art.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

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08th Mar 2013

Theo van Gogh – Essence Portrait

Dealers become famous and then remembered in art history primarily for the artists that they discovered and represented long before they became well known or recognized as important artists. Discovering or strongly championing an unknown but one day destined to become and remain a blue-chip artist is a dealer’s ticket, basically the only ticket, to art history immortality.

That kind of truly risky and often somewhat expensive championing of an artist is and was rare. Of course, artists that offer a new way of painting or producing art who will change art history, are also rare. It takes a dealer with vision and courage to support the work of such an artist\; to buy their works (when they are not selling), advance money to an unrecognized artist, and continue to both cheer the artist on while promoting works while the establishment continues to ignore them as they are ahead of their time. It can be quite a gamble.

The majority of these far-sighted and intrepid dealers went out to the studios, cafes and bars where they met or learned about the artists they are known for discovering. Except for one of the most famous of all dealers.

Art dealer Theo van Gogh is not famous for the many artists whose works he successfully sold, most of whom were well known and collected. He discovered his one day to be a blue chip artist and one of the greatest artists of all time, artist while he was still in his crib, because Theo is the younger brother of Vincent van Gogh, and artist he championed but whose works he failed to sell in either of their lifetimes.
Theo van Gogh by Judy Rey Wasserman uses tests of Psalms 101, 123 and 133 for the strokes

 

Theo van Gogh (Psalms 101, 123, and 133) by Judy Rey Wasserman

Both Vincent and Theo worked for their uncle in a family owned business of art selling that had offices in both The Netherlands and Great Briton. This is how Vincent came to be in London, where he was also exposed to the great works of the English artists (obviously he was previously familiar with Ditch art, and their influence is clearly seen in the colors of his earliest works). Vincent moved on to seemingly fail at other things until he decided to be an artist.

Theo moved to Paris, where he continued to work as an art dealer and met many of the artists we now know as the Impressionists, plus, those that became the Pointillists and Gauguin. By this time Vincent had begun to take up art, and Theo invited his to Paris, to meet the artists there. Thus begins the time when more and more Theo helps to unfailingly
support Vincent’s art goals, both emotionally and financially.

It is said that Vincent van Gogh never sold a painting, but in actuality, his dealer and brother Theo bought his works in order to support him. However, Theo, who was successfully selling the works of far less avant garde artists, could not sell Vincents works.

Theo died of illness about six moths after Vincent succumbed to a gunshot wound, that new evidence indicates may not have been self inflicted. They are buried side-by-side in Auvers-sur-Oise, France.

Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, Theo’s widow, continued Theo’s efforts. She edited and produced volumes of the brothers’ letters, and also promoted Vincent’s work and reputation through her donations of his work to various early retrospective exhibitions.and worked with artist friends of Vincent van Gogh’s to ultimately gain recognition for his art.

The strokes used to create this new Essence portrait of Theo van Gogh are the original letters from Psalms 101, 123, and 133. Psalm 133, also known as Hiney ma tov, was used about twice as much as the other two. Psalm 133is the psalm of friendship and brotherhood and references the relationship of Moses and Aaron. Since their father was a reverend it had to be well known to both Vincent and Theo. It says, “Behold, how good it is for brethren to dwell together in unity”

Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) by Judy Rey Wasserman

 
 

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

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01st Mar 2013

Leaving Winter Sunset Tree

Leaving Winter Sunset Tree (study) is a created with strokes that are the letters from the words of Genesis 1-2:7. This work is a part of two of my series, fitting into both Genesis Sunsets and Trees of Life.

It is late winter here. The early blooming jonquils are pushing their heads up above the dirt and here and there, what is left of the snow from the major winter storms.

Personally, it has been a long winter here in the country, with many days of being “snowed in” due to unsafe roads.

From my studio I can see sunsets all winter long because the hedges and trees that hide them in other seasons lack leaves. Although some days the sunsets are dramatic, but never quite as much as the ones when itis warmer. Somehow, even when cozy and warm indorses, from my window I can “see” the cold.

I began work on this small study a year ago, and then propped it up where I could see it, staring at it every day for a year, debating various solutions to what I sensed was the problem(s).  This week, I finally figured out a way to show that cold and completed the study.A larger version will follow from what I have now learned.
Leaving Winter Sunset Tree by Judy Rey Wasserman

Leaving Winter Sunset Tree by Judy Rey Wasserman

2013, acrylic, ink and watercolor pencils on paper, Strokes: Genesis 1-2:7

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Download a free copy click: Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.
Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.
Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration Comments No Comments »