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Archive for July, 2014

11th Jul 2014

How Did I Miss Pissarro’s Birthday?!

Happy Belated Birthday to Camille Pissarro!

Since Pissarro is one of the most influential artists in my life, and also since his birthday falls only two days prior to my own, I am woefully embarrassed to admit that yesterday I forgot to make his yearly birthday tweet. In my meager defense I can only point out that yesterday I was woefully sleep deprived (you should only see the remains of the poor candle I burned at both ends!). I nodded off early (calling it a nap) and awoke surprised to see that the sun had risen. So, for the first time since a few years ago when I ended up spending the night in an emergency ward room due to an accident, I even failed to tweet out my daily sign-off message (blessing).

Camille Pissarro was born on July 10, 1830, in what is now the US Virgin Islands, which were then in the Dutch West Indies.

Almost every Modern and Contemporary artist owes him a great debt of thanks, from the Impressionists right up to my theory of Post Contemporary art.

Pissarro helped create and keep together the group of artists that became known as the Impressionists and personally also influenced the Post Impressionists, the Neo-Impressionists and the Pointillists. The artists who turned to him for his artistic advice (wisdom!), encouragement and friendship included, but are not limited to: Claude Monet, Édouard Manet , Armand Guillaumin, EdgarDegas, Mary Cassatt, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Cezanne, Georges Seurat, and Paul Gauguin.

Influenced by both science and religious concepts the Impressionists sought to portray the light. Pissarro was also a revolutionary in that he portrayed the common man (a theme later taken up by van Gogh) more that the then also revolutionary focus on the emerging middle class (favored by Manet, Monet, Degas and Renoir), instead of the wealthy and renowned.

As a founder and leader of Impressionism, Pissarro, as a founder of Impressionism could have continued down that path once his work was esteemed, which is what artists normally do once their work becomes accepted. Instead, Pissarro courageously veered off to focus on new, more radical ideas, joining with the Neo-Impressionists. Thus, Pissarro is the only artist to have shown his work at all eight Paris Impressionist exhibitions, and also in all four of the major Post-Impressionists exhibits, alongside the works of Georges Seurat, Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.

The ideas and movements of Modern and now Contemporary art all stem from and build upon the ideas of Pissarro and the Post Impressionists he mentored and influenced.

When I began my experiment by painting the first work of what was to become Post Conceptual Art theory, I was actually thinking about Pissarro. I knew that what I was doing was revolutionary, as revolutionary as focusing upon the light and not the flora, fauna, architecture or person(s) that the light was falling upon to reveal. In my the e book, In the Beginning, I tell the story of that first experiment and even include my Post Conceptual and UnGraven Image art portrait of Camille Pissarro, which points to and even cements his influence on art even to our day.

Camille Pissarro by Judy Rey Wasserman Strokes: Psalm 27, Psalm 119:105, Ecclesiastes 2:13, Psalm36:10, Isaiah 60:1

Camille Pissarro by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes: Psalm 27, Psalm 119:105, Ecclesiastes 2:13, Psalm36:10, Isaiah 60:1

 

 

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Get a copy of the currently free prior to and during an upcoming crowd funding campaign e book: In the Beginning via the right hand column on this page or via http://artofseeingthedivine.com/booklet.htm.

Check out the investment quality limited edition prints and decorative fine art at the online store and secure shopping cart. All purchases 100% guaranteed satisfaction. Plus, you can also get a copy of In the Beginning (still free at the date of this blog) or the “Manifesto of UnGraven Image Art – a Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Strokes”, plus gain membership to the mailing list via the store.

Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.

Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

If you wish to have an advantage and to know exactly when the campaign goes live so you have first choice of the rewards that are for originals or limited editions,and get a copy of the free e book, you can use this link to sign up for the revamped free newsletter:
http://artofseeingthedivine.com/phplist/?p=subscribe

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Theory and Show Reviews Comments No Comments »

10th Jul 2014

Is Art for Everyone Now?

In a way, art has always been for everyone, from the cave paintings until today. It is often shown in public spaces so that everyone in the community can view it.

Yet there continues to be a sense that art is not really for everyone as only wealthy and powerful individuals or companies, or government or religious institutions can afford to collect the best known and revered art. There is a question and ongoing debate that asks: If art is for everyone, shouldn’t everyone be able to own art?

People from all classes feel that they own music, literature and films. Certainly the music and film and video industries have and are experiencing upheaval in how they are distributed so that more people can see and “own” digital reproductions of works. The publishing industry is currently also experiencing an upheaval as e books and readers grow in popularity, and authors self-publish, by-passing the publishing paradigm of the past century.

Fine art, especially two dimensional original works on paper or canvas and three dimensional sculpture is experiencing some change of method (like 3-D printing) and materials (like original digital prints). Art fairs may be somewhat changing sales and distribution, but generally the same galleries represent the artists only they set up small temporary galleries at the fairs. The paradigm for collecting art has not radically changed the way it has for buying books and obtaining soundtracks or videos.

That people other than a religious institution, the very wealthy or the government can own art is a modern idea. The idea is spreading thanks to the events of the Twentieth Century that show middle class people finding and buying art from artists who later become blue chip artists, making these early collectors wealthy.

In reality, keeping an artwork, like a painting in a good environment for its preservation, insuring it, correct framing, etc., is costly, but not out of reach for the solidly middle class. One well known middle class collector couple was Herb and Dorothy Vogel. The Vogels had little space in their one bedroom apartment as so much was relegated to the storage of their art collection. The Vogels had no children and lived frugally on only one of their salaries so that they could afford to collect art. Yet, they were not serious investors. They were serious art collectors who collected only works that they appreciated. They enjoyed meeting artists, going to their studios and discovering emerging art. Plus, at the time that they were collecting, prior to the Internet, they had an advantage: the Vogels lived in NYC. Eventually they gave their collection away, primarily to the National Gallery of Art, in Washington, D.C.

As collectors the Vogels were an exception. Although the Impressionists turned their attention to the middle classes, and even the peasants, original art was and is predominantly collected by people who are very wealthy and at a lower price point, such as for limited edition prints, by the upper middle class.

Until very recently having great (blue chip) art in one’s home meant buying so-so art reproductive prints or beautiful and expensive coffee table art books. Now anyone in the world with an Internet connection can easily access much of the greatest art in the world as most major museums and many galleries show their art on their websites and apps. Yet the art itself remains where it is and owned by others.

Digital print technology continues to improve, and is so good that original prints are referred to and sold as paintings by fine art galleries for thousands and tens of thousands of dollars. This same technology is applied to reproductions of works by well-known artists whose museum shows are blockbusters, such as Van Gogh, Picasso and Warhol. While the original is always best, new quality digital reproductions on paper or canvas have been mistaken for an original at first glance.

Historically, the community has always owned its art to a great extent, from the cave paintings to the street art of Banksy. The “true” owners were often the religious establishments, the rulers and the very wealthy, but showing off the art has always been popular.

Our communities are expanding thanks to the Internet, which is shifting our experience of distance and time as we quickly connect with those on other continents. A growing and interconnected community of artists, curators, collectors, art writers and historians, museum directors, dealers and enthusiasts (in no special order here) are connecting through social media. The walls where we display art are no longer just in our studios, homes, offices, galleries or museums, but also on out Facebook walls, in our Twitter streams, pinned on Pinterest, shared on Instagram and on blogs like this one.

This means that someone who lives far from the cities that attract artists, especially emerging artists, can discover the potentially next blue chip artists through social media, by reading posts, tweets and blogs and looking at the jpgs of their art that they post. A visit to an artist’s Facebook wall can be a bit like visiting with an artist in her studio and often there is a link to the artist’s blog where more images and ideas are posted.

If the Internet and social media had existed for Vincent van Gogh or Monet, given his literary letter writing skills he probably would have had a blog, definitely joined the art discussions on Facebook, and images of his work would have reached a wide audience in his lifetime. Would an Internet version of the Vogels who were looking to collect emerging artists have discovered him? So far this kind of discovery of a new artist who becomes recognized as a blue chip artist has not occurred, but it will happen.

vanGoghPsalm113BW

Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) by Judy Rey Wasserman, Strokes: Original letters of the words of Psalm 113

The future looks exciting as technologies continue to develop that will inevitably disrupt the making and distribution of art in ways that before the Internet we never could have imagined.

This article began as a comment to a Facebook wall post: “Carter Cleveland Says Art in the Future Will Be for Everyone -The Artsy Founder Writes That the Internet Holds the Promise of a World Where Art Is as Ubiquitous as Music Is Today” (WSJ) http://online.wsj.com/articles/carter-cleveland-says-art-in-the-future-will-be-for-everyone-1404762157

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Get a copy of the currently free prior to and during an upcoming crowd funding campaign e book: In the Beginning via the right hand column on this page or via http://artofseeingthedivine.com/booklet.htm.

Check out the investment quality limited edition prints and decorative fine art at the online store and secure shopping cart. All purchases 100% guaranteed satisfaction. Plus, you can also get a copy of In the Beginning (still free at the date of this blog) or the “Manifesto of UnGraven Image Art – a Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Strokes”, plus gain membership to the mailing list via the store.

Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.

Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

If you wish to have an advantage and to know exactly when the campaign goes live so you have first choice of the rewards that are for originals or limited editions,and get a copy of the free e book, you can use this link to sign up for the revamped free newsletter:
http://artofseeingthedivine.com/phplist/?p=subscribe

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art Collecting, Art Theory and Show Reviews Comments No Comments »