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31st Oct 2014

How are Bitcoin, the Bible & Art Related?

Any image of a crypto currency coin is a fantasy, even if it is a logo, since crypto currencies do not exist in real coin form. That is intrinsic to crypto currencies. Basically they can be understood as digital mathematical equations that have been solved and exist on a blockchain, which is also found only via the Internet.  Bitcoins and other crypto currencies are conceptual money.

The artwork shown here (below) is my Essence Portrait (basic image) of a Bitcoin.  It is a part of my In God We Trust art series, and its new Money Project.

Fiat currencies, those issued by a government have always had a physical form. Usually the artwork shown on a coin or bill has political relevance and reinforced the ideas of the country’s culture.  Fiat currencies that you may know or use are called:  dollars, Euros, British sterling, yen, pesos, marks and shekels, etc.  These forms of currency used to be backed by gold or silver, but none are backed by anything other than their governments strength and credit today.

Since neither fiat currencies nor crypto currencies are backed by any precious metal or other commodity, it is very simple to transfer their value between companies and individuals electronically and digitally. For example when you use a debit card to make a purchase the numerical value of that purchase is subtracted from your account and added to the accounts of the merchant and processing company. Actual paper or coin money is not actually physically transferred from your bank to the bank and merchant’s account.

 History and movies are filled with true and fictional accounts of train and armored car robberies that occurred as money or the precious gold or silver that backed it were moved in and out of banks.  Today’s bank robbers are hackers who rob digital databases for account information that they use to transfer funds to their own accounts. Both fiat and crypto currencies have endured these attacks.

In a way crypto currencies are safer than fiat currencies as a robber cannot rob digital wallets at gunpoint because physically there is no way to collect their loot. Armed robbers can and still do rob stores and banks and get away with currency bills and coins. Art robberies are also continue, but frankly, I cannot recall any art armed robberies.

Ironically, as art my image of a Bitcoin has value when it becomes a limited edition signed print or painting, which could be paid for online through my shopping card with a debit card,or handed to me in cash or sent  inbitcoin (or fractional amount). This image will be used in artwork that is available as perks and bonuses to reward levels in my upcoming Indiegogo campaign.

In addition to its value as art, this artwork is created following the tenets of Post Conceptual art’s UnGraven Image theory. Each and every stroke that makes up this image is a letter, a Torah font letter taken from specific Bible texts that relate to the image.

Bitcoin (Essence Portrait) by Judy Rey Wasserman

These letters also are symbols that also elegantly reference strings of elementary physics, which are the basis of the physical universe. Thus the strokes present an extra level of information that is additional to the image, adding additional and intrinsic informational value.

Bitcoin as a currency that is based on information called bits. These bits of information are binary. Likewise Torah font Hebrew is a binary font – the only alpha numeric binary font in any language. Thus each letter can be written using combinations of two letters, a yud and a vav, and also it is binary as each letter can be written by simply making one or two strokes. Thus, as strokes for any crypto currency, using the Torah font closely relates to digitized information.

Bitcoin as the most popular and prominent crypto currency is making strides forward, and then backwards, and then forward again to find acceptance and legitimacy with federal, state and foreign governments. Its proponents say that it will help the unbanked, which means poor people, both in industrialized and emerging nations. Of course helping the poor, fair weights and measures and equal opportunities are all found in the Bible, in the Torah(Pentateuch) and those ideas as principles and laws originated there, out in the Sinai desert as the Israelites fled Egypt, and have been carried forward by Jews and then Christians ever since.  Fiat currencies also have an inherent equality without regard to persons insofar as a dollar held by a poor person is worth as much as one held by someone wealth, but this is generally true for most valuable items and commodities, as well as all crypto currencies.

I have also noted that Bitcoin is making its best strides forward primarily in countries where the Bible is welcomed or at least legal to own and discuss openly.  This toleration includes countries that are not thought of as having either many Jews or
Christians, like Japan. It may just be a coincidence, but it is interesting to note.

However, as fine art my images of bitcoins (much more to be revealed over time and in the Indiegogo campaign) can legally physically go and be sold in countries that do not accept Bitcoin as of this writing such as Russia, or are difficult places to own a Bible because art easily crosses borders and barriers.

Close up of strokes of Judy Rey Wasserman's Bitcoin Essence Portrait\

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Get a copy of the currently free prior to and during an upcoming crowd funding campaign e book: In the Beginning via the right hand column on this page or via http://artofseeingthedivine.com/booklet.htm.

Check out the investment quality limited edition prints and decorative fine art at the online store and secure shopping cart. All purchases 100% guaranteed satisfaction. Plus, you can also get a copy of In the Beginning (still free at the date of this blog) or the “Manifesto of UnGraven Image Art – a Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Strokes”, plus gain membership to the mailing list via the store.

Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.

Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

If you wish to have an advantage and to know exactly when the campaign goes live so you have first choice of the rewards that are for originals or limited editions,and get a copy of the free e book, you can use this link to sign up for the revamped free newsletter:
http://artofseeingthedivine.com/phplist/?p=subscribe

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory and Show Reviews, Tolerance, Freedom & Peace Comments No Comments »

15th Oct 2014

Money Project $10 bill as Crowdfunding Perk

Here is a newly completed finished $10 USA bill (#Bible ‘s Exodus 20 – the Ten Commandment’s original letters are the basic strokes and Leviticus 19 are the portrait’s strokes) for my Art as Money project, which is a part of my In God We Trust series. It is an original digital print, or tradigital print as various hand-drawn parts are combined to make the image, plus, some work was completed only on line, using mouse or keyboard. & also perk in an upcoming crowdfunding Indiegogo campaign. I want to show money as currency in a new, less profane way. Hopefully as an inspiration for how we use it. Money can be a blessing or a curse. Which is it for you? What do you think?
USA &10 bill created with strokes from Bible's Exodus 20 (Ten Commandments) and Leviticus 19 by Judy Rey Wasserman

USA $10  Bill Series CF 2014 by Judy Rey Wasserman

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Get a copy of the currently free prior to and during an upcoming crowd funding campaign e book: In the Beginning via the right hand column on this page or via http://artofseeingthedivine.com/booklet.htm.

Check out the investment quality limited edition prints and decorative fine art at the online store and secure shopping cart. All purchases 100% guaranteed satisfaction. Plus, you can also get a copy of In the Beginning (still free at the date of this blog) or the “Manifesto of UnGraven Image Art – a Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Strokes”, plus gain membership to the mailing list via the store.

Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.

Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

If you wish to have an advantage and to know exactly when the campaign goes live so you have first choice of the rewards that are for originals or limited editions,and get a copy of the free e book, you can use this link to sign up for the revamped free newsletter:
http://artofseeingthedivine.com/phplist/?p=subscribe

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Tolerance, Freedom & Peace Comments 1 Comment »

08th Oct 2014

Art as Value, Wealth and Money Project

A new soon to launch art project will explore the creation, understanding and use of wealth through rendering money and objects that are exchanged as wealth, but have no intrinsic value themselves. For instance,  a bag of rice can be exchanged for an amount of wealth, it has an intrinsic value, but the currency paper bills issued by governments, even if they were backed by gold or silver, have no intrinsic worth, they are only small printed pieces of paper that are issued in high amounts.

The art project will include unique fine art images that comprise a subset of my series entitles, In God We Trust. Like all of my UnGraven Image artworks, the images are created using strokes that are the original letters (Torah font) from specifically selected Bible texts. The texts are selected to have relevance to or for the final image.

The project explores what we value, specifically, what the viewer may value, and how we recognize and revere value.

Value and worth in art, life, and world currencies is ever changing. Like the weather, value moves like autumn leaves blown up, down and away by the wind. And, like leaves on deciduous trees, value moves through
seasons that are both intrinsic (personal) and extrinsic (societal).  An example of an intrinsic value change can be seen in the relationship a tot has to a treasured toy or object, like a stuffed animal or toy. The item is often carried everywhere and it must be in the child’s bed at night. Yet by the time the child becomes a teenager that previously treasured item has been discarded. Some items almost always have universal intrinsic value, like water and food protein sources.

We are all aware of occurrences of extrinsic value shifts. For instance, when the cost for consumer goods like food or heating oil rise, or when we approach a seasonal communal holiday when we purchase special foods,
decorations and, perhaps even gifts.

Most people, worldwide, think about their wealth (money, or valuables that can be exchanged for goods and services) frequently, more than on a once a day basis. All kinds of thinking and emotions may be involved in relation to money, from excitement and happiness to worry, fear and even grief at loss. We even fuss over money that we do not have, meaning our lack of funding and perceived ability to purchase a desired outcome.

Yet, how aware are we of the actual money we have or seek to own and use? Do you recognize the image below? If so can you specifically indicate exactly where you have seen it? Where is it located? Do you own a similar image yourself?

Federal ReserveSymbol

Look at the image below. Do you see the previous Federal Reserve image above within it?

Cleveland$100billCF2014 USD $100 Bill (Exodus 20) by Judy Rey Wasserman

This art image above of a USA $100 Federal Reserve Note was created with strokes of the original letters of Exodus 20 (Ten Commandments) plus the English letters and numerals, including Judy Rey Wasserman’s signature, which on most other works is in Hebrew in her signature-logo, but here used to emulate the placement of an government official’s signature normally placed on an USA government issued bill. The use of Exodus 20, is to inspire the viewer to use their money lawfully and according to eternal principles and truths.

This original digital image will be one of the prints used in Judy Rey Wasserman’s Upcoming Crowd Funding campaign as a perk for supporters. The campaign will actually be giving art money away to each and every
contributor!

To become a member of Judy Rey Wasserman’s exclusive newsletter (members will be the first people to know when the Indiegogo campaign goes live, and thus will have first dibs on limited door buster and early-bird perks) click sign up here –>  http://artofseeingthedivine.com/phplist/?p=subscribe

To obtain a free (but only until the end of the crowd funding campaign e-book, In The Beginning, which tells the inspirational (and often funny) story of the founding of UnGraven Image Art theory, plus the discovery of Bible Eyes (AKA SHMR Vision), that is a revolutionary fulfillment of Bible prophecy Click here (PDF for you to save will open right up) –>  In the Beginning PDF

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting Comments 1 Comment »

11th Sep 2014

Predicting the Future of Fine Art

The future of fine art is easy to predict in broad terms.

Art’s future is predictable because it continues to repeat its history – only in new configurations that use and stimulate the science, technology and social insights of its current times.

Yet the artists who are creating the future of art can be difficult to recognize, and invest in collecting their works. It is actually scientifically difficult to literally see, and then recognize what is truly revolutionary and new in its own time.

Few people have the ability (brains) that allow them to be early adopters in any field. This is because we actually perceive (including see) see through our memories. When something radically new, is presented to us it is actually difficult and uncomfortable for us to perceive it. Early adopters seem to enjoy this level of discomfort, their experiences with perceiving what is new have been positive (perhaps and especially as young children), so they naturally reach out for the unknown idea or item.

This kind of adoption is different from that of the majority who are eager to own the latest tech gadget that is really at best an improvement of previous gadgets that were generally accepted. Such a gadget is not really radically new. This is why tablets, which are really just a new form of PC, caught on quickly. They are basically smaller laptops or bigger PC-based phones. The original technology that was radically new, and climbed the mountain to gain acceptance was the idea of PCs and then that they could be linked through the something we now call the Internet.

In fine art this tends to make artists, even contemporary artists who are making works much like the artists of a previous generation acceptable. Thus Contemporary artists whose works resemble Picasso type abstractions, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop Art are acceptable but appear to be new because they use new materials or have some twist. These works are not revolutionary, just new twists on what was previously revolutionary. These artists and their works are discovered by the art world “cognoscenti” and accepted into a blue chip gallery fold. It is as if the fact that a work has sold for a high price somehow makes it radical, even revolutionary. Yet, art history shows that many works by now almost forgotten establishment artists sold for high prices in their day.

Currently once actually radical Conceptual art and artists like Lawrence Weiner are now also accepted. Now that these works are accepted, they are not actually currently radically new, but they were radical and pioneering until enough (a tipping point) of had enough encounters with them so they could readily be seen and understood.

Ironically this ready acceptance of artists who are new with a slight twist but not really revolutionary is also predictable and a part of art’s history.

In fine art the past exists to give us shoulders to stand on so we can see and direct a path to the future. Art (I mean great art) is ALWAYS revolutionary, which implies a lack of nostalgia — just ask Gauguin and probably the other artists who overturned the established norm of their time.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Get a copy of the currently free prior to and during an upcoming crowd funding campaign e book: In the Beginning via the right hand column on this page or via http://artofseeingthedivine.com/booklet.htm.

Check out the investment quality limited edition prints and decorative fine art at the online store and secure shopping cart. All purchases 100% guaranteed satisfaction. Plus, you can also get a copy of In the Beginning (still free at the date of this blog) or the “Manifesto of UnGraven Image Art – a Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Strokes”, plus gain membership to the mailing list via the store.

Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.

Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

If you wish to have an advantage and to know exactly when the campaign goes live so you have first choice of the rewards that are for originals or limited editions,and get a copy of the free e book, you can use this link to sign up for the revamped free newsletter:
http://artofseeingthedivine.com/phplist/?p=subscribe

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory and Show Reviews Comments No Comments »

10th Jul 2014

Is Art for Everyone Now?

In a way, art has always been for everyone, from the cave paintings until today. It is often shown in public spaces so that everyone in the community can view it.

Yet there continues to be a sense that art is not really for everyone as only wealthy and powerful individuals or companies, or government or religious institutions can afford to collect the best known and revered art. There is a question and ongoing debate that asks: If art is for everyone, shouldn’t everyone be able to own art?

People from all classes feel that they own music, literature and films. Certainly the music and film and video industries have and are experiencing upheaval in how they are distributed so that more people can see and “own” digital reproductions of works. The publishing industry is currently also experiencing an upheaval as e books and readers grow in popularity, and authors self-publish, by-passing the publishing paradigm of the past century.

Fine art, especially two dimensional original works on paper or canvas and three dimensional sculpture is experiencing some change of method (like 3-D printing) and materials (like original digital prints). Art fairs may be somewhat changing sales and distribution, but generally the same galleries represent the artists only they set up small temporary galleries at the fairs. The paradigm for collecting art has not radically changed the way it has for buying books and obtaining soundtracks or videos.

That people other than a religious institution, the very wealthy or the government can own art is a modern idea. The idea is spreading thanks to the events of the Twentieth Century that show middle class people finding and buying art from artists who later become blue chip artists, making these early collectors wealthy.

In reality, keeping an artwork, like a painting in a good environment for its preservation, insuring it, correct framing, etc., is costly, but not out of reach for the solidly middle class. One well known middle class collector couple was Herb and Dorothy Vogel. The Vogels had little space in their one bedroom apartment as so much was relegated to the storage of their art collection. The Vogels had no children and lived frugally on only one of their salaries so that they could afford to collect art. Yet, they were not serious investors. They were serious art collectors who collected only works that they appreciated. They enjoyed meeting artists, going to their studios and discovering emerging art. Plus, at the time that they were collecting, prior to the Internet, they had an advantage: the Vogels lived in NYC. Eventually they gave their collection away, primarily to the National Gallery of Art, in Washington, D.C.

As collectors the Vogels were an exception. Although the Impressionists turned their attention to the middle classes, and even the peasants, original art was and is predominantly collected by people who are very wealthy and at a lower price point, such as for limited edition prints, by the upper middle class.

Until very recently having great (blue chip) art in one’s home meant buying so-so art reproductive prints or beautiful and expensive coffee table art books. Now anyone in the world with an Internet connection can easily access much of the greatest art in the world as most major museums and many galleries show their art on their websites and apps. Yet the art itself remains where it is and owned by others.

Digital print technology continues to improve, and is so good that original prints are referred to and sold as paintings by fine art galleries for thousands and tens of thousands of dollars. This same technology is applied to reproductions of works by well-known artists whose museum shows are blockbusters, such as Van Gogh, Picasso and Warhol. While the original is always best, new quality digital reproductions on paper or canvas have been mistaken for an original at first glance.

Historically, the community has always owned its art to a great extent, from the cave paintings to the street art of Banksy. The “true” owners were often the religious establishments, the rulers and the very wealthy, but showing off the art has always been popular.

Our communities are expanding thanks to the Internet, which is shifting our experience of distance and time as we quickly connect with those on other continents. A growing and interconnected community of artists, curators, collectors, art writers and historians, museum directors, dealers and enthusiasts (in no special order here) are connecting through social media. The walls where we display art are no longer just in our studios, homes, offices, galleries or museums, but also on out Facebook walls, in our Twitter streams, pinned on Pinterest, shared on Instagram and on blogs like this one.

This means that someone who lives far from the cities that attract artists, especially emerging artists, can discover the potentially next blue chip artists through social media, by reading posts, tweets and blogs and looking at the jpgs of their art that they post. A visit to an artist’s Facebook wall can be a bit like visiting with an artist in her studio and often there is a link to the artist’s blog where more images and ideas are posted.

If the Internet and social media had existed for Vincent van Gogh or Monet, given his literary letter writing skills he probably would have had a blog, definitely joined the art discussions on Facebook, and images of his work would have reached a wide audience in his lifetime. Would an Internet version of the Vogels who were looking to collect emerging artists have discovered him? So far this kind of discovery of a new artist who becomes recognized as a blue chip artist has not occurred, but it will happen.

vanGoghPsalm113BW

Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) by Judy Rey Wasserman, Strokes: Original letters of the words of Psalm 113

The future looks exciting as technologies continue to develop that will inevitably disrupt the making and distribution of art in ways that before the Internet we never could have imagined.

This article began as a comment to a Facebook wall post: “Carter Cleveland Says Art in the Future Will Be for Everyone -The Artsy Founder Writes That the Internet Holds the Promise of a World Where Art Is as Ubiquitous as Music Is Today” (WSJ) http://online.wsj.com/articles/carter-cleveland-says-art-in-the-future-will-be-for-everyone-1404762157

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Get a copy of the currently free prior to and during an upcoming crowd funding campaign e book: In the Beginning via the right hand column on this page or via http://artofseeingthedivine.com/booklet.htm.

Check out the investment quality limited edition prints and decorative fine art at the online store and secure shopping cart. All purchases 100% guaranteed satisfaction. Plus, you can also get a copy of In the Beginning (still free at the date of this blog) or the “Manifesto of UnGraven Image Art – a Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Strokes”, plus gain membership to the mailing list via the store.

Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.

Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

If you wish to have an advantage and to know exactly when the campaign goes live so you have first choice of the rewards that are for originals or limited editions,and get a copy of the free e book, you can use this link to sign up for the revamped free newsletter:
http://artofseeingthedivine.com/phplist/?p=subscribe

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art Collecting, Art Theory and Show Reviews Comments No Comments »

13th Jun 2014

What is an Original Art Print in the Digital Age?

In today’s world of reproductions and digital works the difference between an original print and a reproductive fine art print can be difficult to differentiate. An original art print is a unique print that does not exist separately as another piece of art. Generally any artwork that is a print is a one of a multiple of the same artwork that is published as an edition.

Prior to photography and then fine art digital printing original prints by master artists were easy to distinguish.  The only possible confusion for an untrained eye could be difficult to differentiate a drawing made with ink from a black and white traditional print. However, if one looks closely, comparing an ink drawing to a traditional print by the same artist, the difference can be seen due to the variety and fluidity of line that an artist’s ink pen allows.

Photographs are all originals. Even a photograph of the ceiling taken by a child is an original. That something is an original and does not exist elsewhere does not make it art worth collecting, except possibly to the friends and relatives of the artist or child. Paradoxically, the rule of thumb is that an original artwork by an artist is more valuable than a reproductive print of the same size by the same artist. Exodus 20 (Ten Commandments) George Washington by Judy Rey Wasserman

Ten Commandments – George Washington by Judy Rey Wasserman is a contemporary example of a black and white hand drawn work that when digitally printed on paper can be difficult to distinguish from the original work with the naked eye.See more about this available open edition print

Photographs are also considered to be prints as previously to the digital camera they were created from negatives. Creating a photograph from a negative is a printmaking process, just as creating an image from a plate, woodcut, or stone is a printmaking process.

In the digital age photographs are often uploaded directly from digital cameras to computers. The physical negative disappears from the process. The file can be directly printed by special printers that use fine art pigment inks.

Then the uploaded photographic image may be manipulated by the artist in graphics software such as Photoshop, and even drawn upon by the artist using a mouse or computer stylus. When this is done we can understand that the computer becomes like a glove on the artist’s hand, which holds the “paintbrushes” that apply the ink through the printed onto a support such as paper or canvas.

Is such a printed original work of art considered to be a print or a “painting”?

Currently, in the art world the answer is that such a work can be considered either a print or a painting. However, if there is more than one of these works printed and distributed, then it is a print as it is part of an edition, even if that edition only has two copies.

Artists today are creating works directly on computers. Hand held pens and brushes have been replaced by their counterparts that make all kinds of strokes in graphics software.

In addition paintings and drawings can be scanned into an artist’s computer to become a part of a new work that only exists in digital format until printed. An artwork that includes an image initially hand drawn or painted and then altered significantly or combined with other images via a graphics software program is sometimes called a tradigital print.  These works are original prints as the drawing(s) or painting(s) that were initially created off the computer have been significantly altered or added to, thus creating a significantly different image than the original(s).

Such prints are not reproductive prints, as these are made to as closely as possible replicate a specific painting or drawing that was created and exits on its own outside of any computing device.

Dollar Bill, 2012, Series J by Judy Rey Wasserman (Ten Commandments)

The artwork image above is of an original print. Here you can see that the portrait of George Washington above has been digitally inserted into another work also created by the artist’s hand. Actually, in the In God We Trust Money series often other pieces of the bills are also created much larger and then scanned in to be used and digitally altered via graphics software. Since Wasserman uses original Torah font letters for each and every troke, crating a work as small as a life-size front of a USD bill would be difficult. However, by using 21st century technology her creative idea is accomplished. Even though individual pieces of this work were created outside of the print, the image as a whole does not exist except as a print. Thus this is an example of an original print and a tradigital print.

Prints can cross over to become paintings when the artist applies a significant amount of paint to them after they are printed. Andy Warhol turned many of his prints into paintings by painting under or over the silk-screened image.  This made them significantly different from each other and individually unique, even though the silk-screened image was the same on the canvases. Artists today are also painting on their digitally produced and printed works to create individual paintings.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Get a copy of the currently free prior to and during an upcoming crowd funding campaign e book: In the Beginning via the right hand column on this page.

Check out the investment quality limited edition prints and decorative fine art at the online store and secure shopping cart. All purchases 100% guaranteed satisfaction. Plus, you can also get a copy of In the Beginning (still free at the date of this blog) or the “Manifesto of UnGraven Image Art – a Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Strokes”, plus gain membership to the mailing list via the store.

Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.

Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

If you wish to have an advantage and to know exactly when the campaign goes live so you have first choice of the rewards that are for originals or limited editions,and get a copy of the free e book, you can use this link to sign up for the revamped free newsletter:
http://artofseeingthedivine.com/phplist/?p=subscribe

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art Collecting Comments No Comments »

27th May 2014

Why Collect Fine Art Prints?

Fine art prints offer an entry point into real art collecting.

Art collecting can be rewarding financially, esthetically, socially and even spiritually.

If the work of an artist appreciates, art can be a good financial investment. Since fine art is now an international commodity, it is not at the whim of one country’s stock market or economic conditions
ever.Collectable fine art prints should be signed, numbered and issued in specified limited edition, which can range from one to maybe over 750, but never
more than that number for any specific image. Prints can be original prints such as a  silk-screen, etching and photograph, or digital on paper or canvas.
Spring Shema Tree by Judy Rey Wasserman

Spring Tree Aleph by Judy Rey Wasserman

To see more about this print, including a larger image click: HERE

An artist’s fine art prints should always be less expensive that their paintings of similar size, with the possible exception of monographs as they are also one-of-a-kind. This means one can afford a print of an artist’s work when the painting is out of reach. This works for both the artist and the collector. However, as the artist’s career continues to reach new heights the value of all the artist’s work increases. Andy Warhol’s prints have rewarded their collector’s with the same kinds of percentage returns on investment as his paintings.

Every artist’s paintings and prints can vary in worth over time. An image that becomes iconic, whether a painting or a print will become worth more over time than a more obscure work. For example, using Warhol’s market, his portraits of well know celebrities today, such as Liz Taylor, Marilyn Monroe or Warhol himself tend to be worth more than same sized and condition works from a similar date of someone hardly well known today.

Socially, collecting fine art can open doors to meeting new people, including artists, collectors and people interested in art. Most galleries hold openings that are good places to meet artists (artists attend each others openings frequently) and other collectors. Also, having real fine art prints on one’s wall is a good step away from mere decorations including the kinds of soulless paintings turned out by mills and sold in decorative and frame shops in malls.

Displaying a fine art print (meaning one by a good artist made with quality materials) is similar to having fine furniture, rather than the stuff that contains formaldehyde and is covered with plastic veneer. Collectors who display original art, including original prints in their homes or places of business shows financial prosperity and culture.

Finally, in the process of discovering artists and new trends one will be learning more about art and art history. Creating art, something that is useless except as itself is something uniquely human. There is something special about real artistic communication as we have the chance to see the world in a new way through another person’s eyes.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com. Download a copy of the Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke, Get a copy of the ebook: In the Beginning, and check out the investment quality limited edition prints and decorative fine art at the online store and secure shopping cart. All purchases 100% guaranteed satisfaction.

Check out the images and availability of limited and open edition prints — Click: store.

Follow her on Twitter at @judyrey

If you wish to have an advantage and to know exactly when the campaign goes live so you have first choice of the rewards that are for originals or limited editions,and get a copy of the free e book, you can use this link to sign up for the revamped free newsletter:
http://artofseeingthedivine.com/phplist/?p=subscribe

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