Change your vision to change your life series

By Judy Rey Wasserman

Changing how we see is relatively easy as seeing involves our brains much more than our eyes. If you have ever changed your mind about anything or anyone then you can change the way you see.

Our eyes are only capable of seeing impressions of light. Our brains decode the impressions received from the eyes by comparing it to other previous impressions of light. We see through our memories. The more similar memories we have the easier it is to “see” (recognize) who or what is before us.

We maneuver through our days based upon how we perceive the physical reality around us. The sense of vision is the basic go-to form of perception for the majority of people. A quick search on Google shows that 65% of people are primarily visual learners – a “percentage fact” that is disputed, but it could be an even larger percentage.

Sighted people rely on their visual perception to recognize or affirm:

  • Who and/or what is in their immediate vicinity
  • What is happening around them
  • Where they are
  • What time of day it is
  • How they of those around them are feeling, how they are accomplishing tacks, and even how to proceed with further action

If you noticed that the above bullet point list is formed using the who, what, where, when and how of journalism (news casting), you are correct.  Much of our information, even when spoken through radio, podcast or talking head newscast show, has it basis in how people visually perceive.  Even so, the oft repeated “one picture is worth a thousand words” results in illustrations or videos of events – or products – preferred by viewers and buyers.

Since our eyes only see through our memories, changing our vision is as simple as purposefully creating new memories.

Along with our visual memories come remembrances that seemed significant, or at lease somehow useful information pertaining to those memories. These “attached” memories can include perceptions by other senses, plus value-based ideas and decisions. For instance, looking at a photo of a favorite food can evoke memories of smell, taste and even ouch, including the food’s temperature. A simple photograph can also bring memories of previous ideas and decisions about that food, such as it is a favorite, it is good, a heathy food, a fattening food, and even decisions by the viewer about the happiness consuming the food will generate.

You probably have a favorite food. Perhaps, you call it a comfort food.

Pause for a moment a picture one of your favorite foods in your mind. Image its taste, its scent and feel. Is it salty or sweet? Crisp, chewy, or soft – or a combination? Served hot, warm, room temperature or cold? Imagine that you are tasting this food right now. Give yourself enough time enjoying your food imagining, and then continue reading.

To create the previous food imagining you used your perceptual memories of experiences involving that food.

Conceptual artists aim to provoke thoughts and memories, by using the viewer’s visual perception. Word Art is a form of Conceptual Art. Word Art is a form of Conceptual Art that uses words to provoke images and ideas.

Let’s do a visual memory changing art exercise using a Word art experience to inspire change in how you see the divine.

The word “divine”, D-i-V-i-N-E contains two i letters, which was specifically emphasized in the way it was just written. See them?

There is a kind of homonym type sound-alike between the name of the letter and the word eye. When spoken their names match.

The play of sounds in English — eye and aye are pronounced the same — adds another level of positive or affirmative information.

Between those two ieyes is a letter V.  Thus: i V i

If we slightly raise the i letters to towards the top-of-the-line height and turn the i letters 45 degrees counterclockwise, we get:

We maneuver through our days based upon how we perceive the physical reality around us. The sense of vision is the basic go-to form of perception for the majority of people. A quick search on Google shows that 65% of people are primarily visual learners – a “percentage fact” that is disputed, but it could be an even larger percentage.

Sighted people rely on their visual perception to recognize or affirm:

  • Who and/or what is in their immediate vicinity
  • What is happening around them
  • Where they are
  • What time of day it is
  • How they of those around them are feeling, how they are accomplishing tacks, and even how to proceed with further action

If you noticed that the above bullet point list is formed using the who, what, where, when an how of journalism (news casting), you are correct.  Much of our information, even when spoken through radio, podcast or talking head newscast show, has it basis in how people visually perceive.  Even so, the oft repeated “one picture is worth a thousand words” results in illustrations or videos of events – or products –preferred by viewers and buyers.

Our eyes are only capable of seeing impressions of light. Our brains decode the impressions received from the eyes by comparing it to other previous impressions of light. We see through our memories. The more similar memories we have the easier it is to “see” (recognize) who or what is before us.

Along with our visual memories come remembrances that seemed significant, or at lease somehow useful information pertaining to those memories. These “attached” memories can include perceptions by other senses, plus value-based ideas and decisions. For instance, looking at a photo of a favorite food can evoke memories od smell, taste and even ouch, including the food’s temperature. A simple photograph can also bring memories of previous ideas and decisions about that food, such as it is a favorite, it is good, a heathy food, a fattening food, and even decisions by the viewer about the happiness consuming the food will generate.

You probably have a favorite food. Perhaps, you call it a comfort food.

Pause for a moment a picture one of your favorite foods in your mind. Image its taste, its scent and feel. Is it salty or sweet? Crisp, chewy, or soft – or a combination? Served hot, warm, room temperature or cold? Imagine that you are tasting this food right now. Give yourself enough time enjoying your food imagining, and then continue reading.

To create the previous food imagining you used your perceptual memories of experiences involving that food.

Conceptual artists aim to provoke thoughts and memories, by using the viewer’s visual perception. Word Art is a form of Conceptual Art. Word art is a form of Conceptual Art that uses words to provoke images and ideas.

Let’s do a Visual Memory Changing Art Exercise using a Word Art Experience to Inspire Change in How You see Divine.

The word “divine”, D-i-V-i-N-E contains two i letters, which was specifically emphasized in the way it was just written. See them?

There is a kind of homonym type sound-alike between the name of the letter and the word eye. When spoken their names match.

The play of sounds in English — eye and aye are pronounced the same — adds another level of positive or affirmative information.

Between those two ieyes is a letter V.  Thus: i V i

If we slightly raise the i letters to towards the top-of-the-line height and turn the i letters 45 degrees counterclockwise, we get:

Step 1

The letter V kind of looks like a cartoony, doodle, or emoji type nose.

 It looks even more like a simple depiction of a now if we move the dots of the turned 45 degrees i-eyes to below the center of them.

The letter V kind of looks like a cartoony, doodle, or emoji type nose.

 It looks even more like a simple depiction of a now if we move the dots of the turned 45 degrees i-eyes to below the center of them.

Step 2

When this new look becomes a Word Art image it looks like this:

DiViNE EYES by Judy Rey Wassserman

The Word Art that is shown about can be understood as portraying the Divine looking back at the viewer, at you.  The process of creating this Word Art is depicted on this blog so it is obvious that the Word “Devine” is shown. However, if the final artwork were appeared framed on a gallery wall, most viewers would readily recognize it as a unique portrayal of the word “Divine”.

In the process, or even merely by seeing the completed Word Art you have new and different experiences and visual memories of the word: Divine. A new layer of meaning has been added to the visual written word itself. You can see the word in a new, and hopefully for me, the artist, a inspiring way. Your perception of the reality of the word Divine has a new additional memory level of meaning. Visually perceiving in a new way is always life transforming.

DiViNE EYES by Judy Rey Wasserman

Want to decorate your place with the DiViNE EYES art you just saw created by Judy Rey Wasserman? Check out this downloadable print at https://artofseeingthedivine.com/product/divine-eyes/

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image.

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish.Click: https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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