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30th Mar 2012

Happy Birthday Vincent van Gogh!

Vincent van Gogh was born March 30, 1853 in Zundert, Netherlands. He is known as a Post-Impressionist painter, one of the best know artists world-wide and is credited for his influence on twentieth century art.

Vincent van Gogh has been my favorite artist and painter and now greatest artistic influence ever since I can remember.

My relationship with Vincent van Gogh began as soon as I was able to walk, as my parents took me to the Metropolitan Museum of Art once I could walk, and returned frequently on weekend days of bitter cold or inclement weather (when they could not take me to the playground), as the art delighted me and a kid can wear themselves out walking through the large museum and climbing the stairs. It quickly became and remains a personal “ritual” that the last stop is to see the van Goghs. My favorite painting in the world is there: Cypresses.

Psalm 113 — Vincent van Gogh, 2010, ink on paper, by Judy Rey Wasserman

Since I am founding Post Conceptual Art and a branch of that called as UnGraven Image  van Gogh’s art clearly continues to influence art to our twenty-first Century.

The idea that a secular narrative (image) can convey religious or spiritual content stems from van Gogh. Vincent van Gogh’s father was a minister in the Dutch Reformed Church. Later Vincent van Gogh had a stint as a missionary himself. He wanted people to view his paintings and feel his passion, and he was very passionate about God and His creation.

What makes an artist a “blue chip” artist is their influence on other artists, especially those who go on to also influence other artists. These ideas can later be found in the works of Kandinsky and Rothko, two of the artistic giants and influencers of the Twentieth century (and obviously me).

Psalm 113 — Vincent van Gogh (color #1) 2011, original tradigital print, by Judy Rey Wasserman

I hold that Warhol, who attended his church weekly all of his life, knew these ideas and artistically applied them to the landscape of his urban life, which was filled with news and commercial imagery made by human hands. My belief of this is backed by Warhol’s latter religious works, where he uses commercial brands, such as General Electric and Dove Soap, to symbolize divine light and the Holy Spirit.

At twelve years of age I was given a bus and then train pass, plus as a student I enjoyed free admission to all of the art museums in NYC. I spent most after school afternoons and weekends visiting them, most especially the Met and MoMA, and art galleries until I left college and the Art Student’s League. So, during my artistically formative years, I spent an inordinate amount of time, including many afternoons, simply looking at and studying van Gogh’s works.

At the Met I saw and learned that like Da Vinci, Rembrandt and J.M.W. Turner, van Gogh is a master of dualities. For me his later works burst with passion that at once expresses joy and glory along with pain and fury. As an adolescent, my life (and hormones) also raged with these seemingly disparate emotions, which The Cypresses and Sunflowers echoed, so I felt somehow heard and understood van Gogh in a way that no one else in my world managed to convey.

Van Gogh’s works also helped inspire my idea of using symbols (letters/numbers) for the strokes in a painting. At 8 or 9 years old, I was absent when the rest of my class learned Morse Code. I returned to take a test on it that I utterly failed but the class moved on. All I had was an introduction to the idea that dots and dashes could stand for letters, and to me the dots and dashes looked like the dots and dashes I was familiar with in van Gogh’s paintings. Since I could not read Morse Code, I never spoke of this to my Dad on our museum visits as he was a veteran who knew Morse Code, and my question would reveal my ongoing failure to learn it. For several years I actually thought van Gogh was somewhat painting in Morse Code.

As an adult, I have learned to see the “footprints” of the words of The Divine everywhere and always – even in the darkest moments. There is always a duality, light coming from dark as in Genesis 1. As an artist I work to show this understanding, which I learned from van Gogh in my own unique way, in my art.

The greatest lesson I learned from van Gogh is that visual fine art can change lives. It can inspire new understandings, bridges between people and cultures, and that great art, whatever the narrative, is always somehow holy and inspirational. I doubt that I would be an artist today, or even as good a human being as I continue to strive to become without his influence and spanning across time, his visual friendship, for which I aptly thank God, as van Gogh would have wished.

Portrait of Vincent van Gogh Sunset by Judy Rey Wasserman

Close up section of Psalm 113 and Genesis 1-2:7 — Vincent van Gogh Sunset study, 2012, mixed media on board, by Judy Rey Wasserman

*  *  *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art Comments No Comments »

08th Mar 2013

Theo van Gogh – Scripture Portrait

Dealers become famous and then remembered in art history primarily for the artists that they discovered and represented long before they became well known or recognized as important artists. Discovering or strongly championing an unknown but one day destined to become and remain a blue-chip artist is a dealer’s ticket, basically the only ticket, to art history immortality.

That kind of truly risky and often somewhat expensive championing of an artist is and was rare. Of course, artists that offer a new way of painting or producing art who will change art history, are also rare. It takes a dealer with vision and courage to support the work of such an artist\; to buy their works (when they are not selling), advance money to an unrecognized artist, and continue to both cheer the artist on while promoting works while the establishment continues to ignore them as they are ahead of their time. It can be quite a gamble.

The majority of these far-sighted and intrepid dealers went out to the studios, cafes and bars where they met or learned about the artists they are known for discovering. Except for one of the most famous of all dealers.

Art dealer Theo van Gogh is not famous for the many artists whose works he successfully sold, most of whom were well known and collected. He discovered his one day to be a blue chip artist and one of the greatest artists of all time, artist while he was still in his crib, because Theo is the younger brother of Vincent van Gogh, and artist he championed but whose works he failed to sell in either of their lifetimes.
Theo van Gogh by Judy Rey Wasserman uses tests of Psalms 101, 123 and 133 for the strokes

Theo van Gogh (Psalms 101, 123, and 133) by Judy Rey Wasserman

Both Vincent and Theo worked for their uncle in a family owned business of art selling that had offices in both The Netherlands and Great Briton. This is how Vincent came to be in London, where he was also exposed to the great works of the English artists (obviously he was previously familiar with Ditch art, and their influence is clearly seen in the colors of his earliest works). Vincent moved on to seemingly fail at other things until he decided to be an artist.

Theo moved to Paris, where he continued to work as an art dealer and met many of the artists we now know as the Impressionists, plus, those that became the Pointillists and Gauguin. By this time Vincent had begun to take up art, and Theo invited his to Paris, to meet the artists there. Thus begins the time when more and more Theo helps to unfailingly
support Vincent’s art goals, both emotionally and financially.

It is said that Vincent van Gogh never sold a painting, but in actuality, his dealer and brother Theo bought his works in order to support him. However, Theo, who was successfully selling the works of far less avant garde artists, could not sell Vincents works.

Theo died of illness about six moths after Vincent succumbed to a gunshot wound, that new evidence indicates may not have been self inflicted. They are buried side-by-side in Auvers-sur-Oise, France.

Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, Theo’s widow, continued Theo’s efforts. She edited and produced volumes of the brothers’ letters, and also promoted Vincent’s work and reputation through her donations of his work to various early retrospective exhibitions.and worked with artist friends of Vincent van Gogh’s to ultimately gain recognition for his art.

The strokes used to create this new Essence portrait of Theo van Gogh are the original letters from Psalms 101, 123, and 133. Psalm 133, also known as Hiney ma tov, was used about twice as much as the other two. Psalm 133is the psalm of friendship and brotherhood and references the relationship of Moses and Aaron. Since their father was a reverend it had to be well known to both Vincent and Theo. It says, “Behold, how good it is for brethren to dwell together in unity”

Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) by Judy Rey Wasserman

 * * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art Comments No Comments »

15th Oct 2021

What is Fine Art?  How is it a Good Investment?

Fine Art is a form of inspirational and/or aesthetically appreciated visual communication that can always be understood as a kind of investment.

Fine Art is Always an Investment for its Owner.

All fine art, from an image hastily cut from a magazine or a fuzzy pixelated copy printed from a jpeg (for instance a framed image of the Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa hanging on the wall of an RV) to a famous masterpiece painting by a world-renowned Renaissance artist for instance Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa owned by and hanging in the Louvre Museum is an investment for its owner-collector. In other words, whatever a person conceives as being art may be an investment for that person.

Can a Person Who Owns a Magazine Image of the Mona Lisa

be Considered an Investor?

The Mona Lisa is said to be the most famous, most recognized painting in the world. Chances are then that you, dear reader, have seen the Mona Lisa, or at least a photograph or image of some sort of the Mona Lisa. At the first mention of the Mona Lisa above, perhaps an image, a memory of the Mona Lisa came to mind. If this is true for you, then at some point, consciously or unconsciously, willingly, or unwillingly you spent at least a moment of you time looking at an image of the Mona Lisa

Art – any art that a person sees is always investment in time and attention. The investment of one’s time may be intentional or unintentional. Whatever, eyeballs on art – viewing art – is always an investment of time, which is life.

We are bombarded by art daily, or at least various forms of images that others may consider to be visual art, even fine art. Thanks to the internet, social media, digitized books, magazines, advertisements, plus readily and even freely available printed materials, we see more fine art than any individual, including artists, gallerists, museum curators, art historians, powerful and rich people, etc., ever has been able to view prior to the mass use of PCs and cell phones.

Everyone who has a memory of the Mona Lisa has invested space and energy in their brains’ visual cortexes to the image. The memory may be purposefully kept because it’s a famous painting that educated people recognize, so not remembering it could influence others to think one an ignoramus, otherwise to impress others or fit in, or because the painting was personally inspiring. One of the hallmarks of fine art is that people want to remember it. They have memory of it that they want to keep.

We can choose to invest in seeing fine art, even some of the world’s greatest fine art using our devices via the Internet. In recent years many internationally recognized museums have uploaded their collections. This is a good way to invest in fine art – not financially, of course – and it expands your memories and visual understandings.

The person who owns a framed magazine image of the Mona Lisa has also invested some space to the Mona Lisa. This might be wall space or space in a scrapbook or file. Want to invest your time in seeing much more of the Mona Lisa in a new way? Check out the Louvre’s online Mona Lisa app:  https://www.louvre.fr/en/what-s-on/life-at-the-museum/the-mona-lisa-in-virtual-reality-in-your-own-home

Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci
Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci

Why is Fine Art Considered Valuable?

Fine art is valuable because the memory of it gives us a new way of seeing the world. It literally expands our vision.

How? Scientists and doctors who focus on vision tell us that 90% of vision does not happen through the eyes but via the brain as it compares memories of visual impressions of light to the impressions of light the eyes are currently sending. We see through our memories.

Great artists give us new ways to see by creating new visual communications – that may at first be slightly difficult, or at least novel to see. We may not actually like or “get” the work of a renowned artist when we are first introduced to their art. This new-to-us art does not exactly fit previous visual memories. Art works may be too sumptuous to fit our day-to-day memories, for instance the paintings by Leonardo da Vinci, John Paul Rubens, or Rembrandt; or the sculptures of Michelangelo, Bernini, or Rodin. Other works may be difficult to see at first because they are too brutish or abstracted, such as paintings by Goya, Mondigliani, or Rothko; or the sculptures of Brâncu?i, Giacometti, or Henry Moore.

Even in our time, it is not necessarily easy to visually grasp the Mona Lisa in person, no less from a photograph. This is especially true for the viewer who is used to seeing the work of other famous painters in museums.

Among his many other achievements, Leonardo da Vinci was a pioneering fine art painter who invented new ways of painting and using different types of paint. Da Vinci studied optics, how we see. His understandings led him to create and perfect a technique known as sfumato. This technique broke dramatically with the painting tradition of outlining figures. The Mona Lisa herself, and the background that surrounds her kind of vanishes at the edges due to the artistic blending of shadows and colors. Mona Lisa’s gaze seems to follow the viewer as the viewer moves from one side of the painting to the other. Even more startling, when the viewer stands directly in front of the Mona Lisa she seems to lose her famous smile! Da Vinci understood modern findings that our eyes are less suited to process and pick up shadows directly. However, our peripheral vision can see shadows well. Thus, moving slightly to either side revels the Mona Lisa’s smile from the carefully blended (sfumato) shadows at the sides of the portrait’s eyes and lips.

Seeing the Mona Lisa painting inspires our vision to see our world in a new way, including seeing art itself in a new way. When a work of art inspires many people it is recognized as fine art, and it becomes inordinately valuable. If it continues to inspire generation to come it grows in prestige and value. The Mona Lisa is the most financially valuable painting in the world based as valued by its insurance.

What About Fine Art as a Financial Investment?

It’s conventional, trite but true to advise that all financial investments should be well considered as they always involve risk. If there is a sure thing, from betting on a horse, to buying investment products (like stocks or EFTs), or collecting fine art, probably something illegal taking place in the background.

In Contemporary art there is no such thing as a guarantee that collecting the work of any artist will reap financial rewards. What is popular with current collectors may not inspire future generations.

In the history of Western Art, since the Renaissance, there have been artists who were popular, even renowned who have since faded into the background. Patrons would commission a portrait for posterity, but their second and third plus generations of heirs later regretted that great great granddad had not selected an artist who was scorned at the previous time for the commission.

An easy example of this were the artists who were popular and given commissions by wealthy patrons at the annual Salon of the Royal Academy of Art in the 1860s in Paris, France. At that time being accepted to show in the Salon meant gaining commissions and a secure livelihood for any artist. With the exceptions of Manet and Morisot (and only once a small Monet landscape small basically hidden in the display), the Salon refused to show the works of the artists who became known as Impressionists.

In 1863, in response to the complaints about the number of rejections from the Salon, French Emperor Napoleon III created the first exhibition of the Salon des Refusès, to include works by those refused by the Salon jury. Yet it lacked the significant commissions of the Salon. Many of the works by those to be associated with the Impressionist movement were exhibited there.

In 1874, 30 artists banded together to show their work without the sanction of the government and without a jury. They named themselves the Sociètè Anonyme des Artistes Peintres, Sculpteurs, Graveurs, etc., and staged their exhibition in the former studio of the photographer Nadar (Gaspard Mix Tournachon) in Paris. The group included Paul Cèzanne, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Berthe Morisot, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Alfred Sisley. It was about this time that the name “Impressionist” was coined by an art critic responding to one of Monet’s landscape paintings, Impression, Sunrise. The name was originally meant as a derogatory term, but it was soon adopted by the painters, and by 1877 they were using it as an identifier of their style and their exhibitions.

Generally, based on similar conditions of size, materials and condition of the artwork, the works of the artists who were selected to show in the then prestigious Salon pales in today’s financial value n comparison with paintings made by the Impressionists at that same time. If great great granddad had commissioned or bought a painting from Renoir, Monet, or Pissarro, and it was held by your family until today, then you would be quite wealthy. If not, there would only be an amusing family story about how great great grandad blew an amazing financial opportunity.

Of course, while financially investing in Contemporary artists is a safer bet than going to Las Vegas and playing craps, the best art investment is in the art that is proven over centuries to inspire people. Those works, like the ones of the artists named in this article are beyond the financial reach anyone but the very wealthy, blue-chip corporations and museums.

Contemporary Fine Art Investing Advice

First find a contemporary artist, not an artwork, and invest in that artist’s work(s).

From the artists you decide to invest in, only collect original works, or signed and numbered limited edition works that you acquire directly from the artist or a reputable dealer.

Gallerists, and some collectors advise based upon the current art market’s preferences. The “best” contemporary galleries generally represent the artists whose works currently sell for the highest prices. That means that buying works of those artists may be the safest or least safe and dreadful investment. Prices for art that are skyrocketing up, can also tumble down as tastes change with new generations.

Most every gallerist or art advisor will tell you to buy what you like – what you want to see daily on your walls. Well, probably waking up to see art like one of Goya’s monsters on your walls will not be pleasant, but only buying what you like gives you dull art that is only coddling. Art that evokes a happy memory at the seashore may or may not be great art. Does the artist give you new visual understandings, or inspire you like a Monet, or Dufy did in their day? Find such an artist if you want the best possible investment. Only then select the artwork(s) for your walls.

Look for these criteria before investing in fine art for financial gain:

  1. Does the artist have something strikingly brand new to visually communicate to you, and possibly to others in our time? Does the work communicate something new and meaningful to you? Do you feel connected to the artist somehow (assuming you have not met)? Do you feel closer to truth? To the Divine? To somehow better understanding of who you are? Of some kind of truth about life?
  2. Do not buy immediately, upon first seeing any contemporary artwork! Even my artworks! Go home from the brick-and-mortar gallery or internet gallery. Live a few days of your life – or even weeks. Do you find yourself thinking about the artwork itself? Remembering it. Are you in a good way being moved by it (and not moved only by the possible deal or money you could make)? Are you moved in some way by other works by this artist? [Note: If you saw only one artwork by the artist make sure you investigate and see other works by the artist, online or in person.]
  3. Would you recommend seeing that artwork, or artist’s works to a friend the way you would recommend a good book, show, song, or other type of creative expression that moved you?
  4. Does the art seem important enough to you that you want to support the artist, by giving that artist money, as this is basically what you are doing when collecting contemporary art.
  5. Would you happily purchase an expensive ($50.00+) full color coffee table sized art book of the artist’s work because you know you would enjoy just looking at the excellent photos of the work in private moments?
  6. Given a choice, do you want that piece of art to live in your brain or would you feel diminished if you forgot it?

My favorite artist has been Vincent van Gogh since the time I was a tot being pushed along in a stroller at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. It was the first time I stood up in my stroller to better see the painting before me. I fussed when my Dad tried to move along to see other works. Although van Gogh was greatly renowned, his art was a discovery for me. This was the moment I learned to love what art was and could do for my life. Van Gogh’s work continues to strongly communicate to me, and apparently many other people to this day. As a tot, my parents couldn’t give a painting by van Gogh, so as soon as I discovered there were art books with good images of his works, that became my ongoing gift request. I introduced my younger cousins, my son, and my granddaughter to van Gogh. So, my answers to the above questions in relation to Vincent van Gogh is a resounding: Yes!

In his lifetime Vincent van Gogh sold only one painting. The critics were unkind or ignored him. If you ancestor had gone to the gallerists or shows of the day no art advisor or fellow patron would have advised collecting van Gogh, except for van Gogh’s brother Theo, who failed to sell his works, but did sell the works of other artists who were considered less strange. Strange can be revolutionary, which means new – or just simply strange because it’s dreadful. Van Gogh’s art was waiting to be discovered by collectors who began to collect the prior and previously revolutionary and strange works of the Impressionists. Van Gogh is considered a Post-Impressionist.

My answers are the same for other artists, including da Vinci. I have personally stood in front of the Mona Lisa and remain inspired by that memory. Yes, I also have art books about Leonardo da Vinci. I would hate to lose my memories of his works.

Review the above list considering your answers to the questions in relation to one of your favorites all time artists. Your emotional responses to the questions regarding your favorite artist(s) can help lead you to discover potential contemporary artists that may be worth your investment.

Again, investing in anything financially or with your time and attention, including art, always involves commitment and risk. What you look at becomes memory and we see through our memories.

Psalm 113 Vincent van Gogh portrait
Psalm 113 Vincent van Gogh’s Essence Portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

See more about the Vincent van Gogh Psalm 113 portrait above at (Click –>): https://ungravenimage.com/blog/?s=Vincent+van+Gogh

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image Art.

Change the way you see the world through art mage of the Word. Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Want more tips about Art, Collecting, Changing the way you see the world, and scripture inspiration? Sign up for the Art & Inspiration Newsletter Now

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17th May 2016

Contrasts in Art and the Bible

Painting and drawing theory has much to do with contrasting darks and lights, shapes, etc. The Bible, which is an enduring delight of visual descriptions, begins by contrasting the new light to what was the deep but now with the creation of light is understood as darkness.

“There is no blue without yellow and without orange.” — Vincent Van Gogh

Vivid contrasts are revealed throughout the Bible. I begins with darkness on the face of the deep and proceeds to:

3 “And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.” —  Genesis 1:3-4

The ideas of light and darkness continue throughout the Christian Testament too. In Luke 6:20, the poor receive the kingdom of heaven because in their need (for provision, health, comfort, etc.) their last hope rests on the Divine Love and creative power.  Stark contrast exists between extreme deep lack of the poor and the abundances of the Creator, the kingdom of all that is or ever will be. And yet, to begin to appreciate and experience that abundance, one must recognize one’s own lack.

“I form the light, and create darkness: I make peace, and create evil: I the LORD do all these things,” —Isaiah 45:7

Great artists reveal contrasts of light and darkness in their works, even in the most abstract art works. They have to do this as all that our eyes see are impressions of light. 

Rembrandt van Rijn is a master of especially bringing his subjects, especially in portraits out of the shadows. 

Rembrandt Self-Portrait

There are other thematic contrasts throughout scripture that artists portray, especially emotional ones. There is a profound tension that may be in-your-face as found in works by Vincent van Gogh, Rembrandt or Salvador Dali and celebrity portraits by Andy Warhol; or contrasting emotional tensions may be quietly alluded to, as found in works by Vermeer, Georgia O’Keeffe, Monet and Mark Rothko.  Leonardo Da Vinci splendidly shows so many contrasts, including that of emotional expression, in his Mona Lisa that it has become the most famous portrait in the world.

Psalm 113 Essence Portrait by Vincent van Gogh by Judy Rey Wasserman
Psalm 113 (Vincent van Gogh) by Judy Rey Wasserman

A great painter’s communication of emotional contrast/conflict the Divine is revealed and we also see or recognize truths about ourselves and our own lives. Although this reveal can pertain to the subject matter, for a great artist the contrast/conflict IS the subject matter.

Cypresses MET DP130999

I know this because powerful, brooding yet joyous works by Mark Rothko have brought me to to actual tears, as my emotional response was too great to contain when I felt confronted by own emotional conflicts and contrasts. Similarly, Vincent van Gogh’s The Cypresses in the Metropolitan Museum of art basically rescued me when I was a teen struggling with the emotional conflict warring inside me that swung from my youthful exuberant happiness, increasing autonomy and hope for the future, which radically conflicted with the sadness, fear and anger I felt in my home life. I recognized the same emotional strengths of conflict in van Gogh’s work, and across the centuries felt that someone else had felt as I did, somehow, I was not alone. Van Gogh found a way to show me a balance, even a harmony that could exist, and even exist for me.

For me, evil denotes the absence of G-D, whereas good shines with the Presence. Again, the contrast, and again, one that is a visual reference.

This post was inspired by the cited quote, which was posted by Peter Boaz Jones on his Facebook wall. The initial paragraph here was part of my comment and our discussion there. Peter also contributed the Isaiah 45:7 quote to an earlier draft of this post.  Follow Peter on Twitter where he is: @KlausClodt Thanks Peter!

Use of images: Rembrandt self-portrait attributed to Rembrandt – www.rembrandtpainting.net : Home : Info : Pic, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37544718

Cypresses from the Metropolitan Museum of Art by Vincent van Gogh, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Tolerance, Freedom & Peace Comments 2 Comments »

11th Jul 2014

How Did I Miss Pissarro’s Birthday?!

Happy Belated Birthday to Camille Pissarro!

Since Pissarro is one of the most influential artists in my life, and also since his birthday falls only two days prior to my own, I am woefully embarrassed to admit that yesterday I forgot to make his yearly birthday tweet. In my meager defense I can only point out that yesterday I was woefully sleep deprived (you should only see the remains of the poor candle I burned at both ends!). I nodded off early (calling it a nap) and awoke surprised to see that the sun had risen. So, for the first time since a few years ago when I ended up spending the night in an emergency ward room due to an accident, I even failed to tweet out my daily sign-off message (blessing).

Camille Pissarro was born on July 10, 1830, in what is now the US Virgin Islands, which were then in the Dutch West Indies.

Almost every Modern and Contemporary artist owes him a great debt of thanks, from the Impressionists right up to my theory of Post Contemporary art.

Pissarro helped create and keep together the group of artists that became known as the Impressionists and personally also influenced the Post Impressionists, the Neo-Impressionists and the Pointillists. The artists who turned to him for his artistic advice (wisdom!), encouragement and friendship included, but are not limited to: Claude Monet, Édouard Manet , Armand Guillaumin, EdgarDegas, Mary Cassatt, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Cezanne, Georges Seurat, and Paul Gauguin.

Influenced by both science and religious concepts the Impressionists sought to portray the light. Pissarro was also a revolutionary in that he portrayed the common man (a theme later taken up by van Gogh) more that the then also revolutionary focus on the emerging middle class (favored by Manet, Monet, Degas and Renoir), instead of the wealthy and renowned.

As a founder and leader of Impressionism, Pissarro, as a founder of Impressionism could have continued down that path once his work was esteemed, which is what artists normally do once their work becomes accepted. Instead, Pissarro courageously veered off to focus on new, more radical ideas, joining with the Neo-Impressionists. Thus, Pissarro is the only artist to have shown his work at all eight Paris Impressionist exhibitions, and also in all four of the major Post-Impressionists exhibits, alongside the works of Georges Seurat, Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.

The ideas and movements of Modern and now Contemporary art all stem from and build upon the ideas of Pissarro and the Post Impressionists he mentored and influenced.

When I began my experiment by painting the first work of what was to become Post Conceptual Art theory, I was actually thinking about Pissarro. I knew that what I was doing was revolutionary, as revolutionary as focusing upon the light and not the flora, fauna, architecture or person(s) that the light was falling upon to reveal. In my the e book, In the Beginning, I tell the story of that first experiment and even include my Post Conceptual and UnGraven Image art portrait of Camille Pissarro, which points to and even cements his influence on art even to our day.

Camille Pissarro by Judy Rey Wasserman Strokes: Psalm 27, Psalm 119:105, Ecclesiastes 2:13, Psalm36:10, Isaiah 60:1

Camille Pissarro by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes: Psalm 27, Psalm 119:105, Ecclesiastes 2:13, Psalm36:10, Isaiah 60:1.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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10th Jul 2014

Is Art for Everyone Now?

In a way, art has always been for everyone, from the cave paintings until today. It is often shown in public spaces so that everyone in the community can view it.

Yet there continues to be a sense that art is not really for everyone as only wealthy and powerful individuals or companies, or government or religious institutions can afford to collect the best known and revered art. There is a question and ongoing debate that asks: If art is for everyone, shouldn’t everyone be able to own art?

People from all classes feel that they own music, literature and films. Certainly the music and film and video industries have and are experiencing upheaval in how they are distributed so that more people can see and “own” digital reproductions of works. The publishing industry is currently also experiencing an upheaval as e books and readers grow in popularity, and authors self-publish, by-passing the publishing paradigm of the past century.

Fine art, especially two dimensional original works on paper or canvas and three dimensional sculpture is experiencing some change of method (like 3-D printing) and materials (like original digital prints). Art fairs may be somewhat changing sales and distribution, but generally the same galleries represent the artists only they set up small temporary galleries at the fairs. The paradigm for collecting art has not radically changed the way it has for buying books and obtaining soundtracks or videos.

That people other than a religious institution, the very wealthy or the government can own art is a modern idea. The idea is spreading thanks to the events of the Twentieth Century that show middle class people finding and buying art from artists who later become blue chip artists, making these early collectors wealthy.

In reality, keeping an artwork, like a painting in a good environment for its preservation, insuring it, correct framing, etc., is costly, but not out of reach for the solidly middle class. One well known middle class collector couple was Herb and Dorothy Vogel. The Vogels had little space in their one bedroom apartment as so much was relegated to the storage of their art collection. The Vogels had no children and lived frugally on only one of their salaries so that they could afford to collect art. Yet, they were not serious investors. They were serious art collectors who collected only works that they appreciated. They enjoyed meeting artists, going to their studios and discovering emerging art. Plus, at the time that they were collecting, prior to the Internet, they had an advantage: the Vogels lived in NYC. Eventually they gave their collection away, primarily to the National Gallery of Art, in Washington, D.C.

As collectors the Vogels were an exception. Although the Impressionists turned their attention to the middle classes, and even the peasants, original art was and is predominantly collected by people who are very wealthy and at a lower price point, such as for limited edition prints, by the upper middle class.

Until very recently having great (blue chip) art in one’s home meant buying so-so art reproductive prints or beautiful and expensive coffee table art books. Now anyone in the world with an Internet connection can easily access much of the greatest art in the world as most major museums and many galleries show their art on their websites and apps. Yet the art itself remains where it is and owned by others.

Digital print technology continues to improve, and is so good that original prints are referred to and sold as paintings by fine art galleries for thousands and tens of thousands of dollars. This same technology is applied to reproductions of works by well-known artists whose museum shows are blockbusters, such as Van Gogh, Picasso and Warhol. While the original is always best, new quality digital reproductions on paper or canvas have been mistaken for an original at first glance.

Historically, the community has always owned its art to a great extent, from the cave paintings to the street art of Banksy. The “true” owners were often the religious establishments, the rulers and the very wealthy, but showing off the art has always been popular.

Our communities are expanding thanks to the Internet, which is shifting our experience of distance and time as we quickly connect with those on other continents. A growing and interconnected community of artists, curators, collectors, art writers and historians, museum directors, dealers and enthusiasts (in no special order here) are connecting through social media. The walls where we display art are no longer just in our studios, homes, offices, galleries or museums, but also on out Facebook walls, in our Twitter streams, pinned on Pinterest, shared on Instagram and on blogs like this one.

This means that someone who lives far from the cities that attract artists, especially emerging artists, can discover the potentially next blue chip artists through social media, by reading posts, tweets and blogs and looking at the jpgs of their art that they post. A visit to an artist’s Facebook wall can be a bit like visiting with an artist in her studio and often there is a link to the artist’s blog where more images and ideas are posted.

If the Internet and social media had existed for Vincent van Gogh or Monet, given his literary letter writing skills he probably would have had a blog, definitely joined the art discussions on Facebook, and images of his work would have reached a wide audience in his lifetime. Would an Internet version of the Vogels who were looking to collect emerging artists have discovered him? So far this kind of discovery of a new artist who becomes recognized as a blue chip artist has not occurred, but it will happen.

vanGoghPsalm113BW

Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) by Judy Rey Wasserman, Strokes: Original letters of the words of Psalm 113

The future looks exciting as technologies continue to develop that will inevitably disrupt the making and distribution of art in ways that before the Internet we never could have imagined.

This article began as a comment to a Facebook wall post: “Carter Cleveland Says Art in the Future Will Be for Everyone -The Artsy Founder Writes That the Internet Holds the Promise of a World Where Art Is as Ubiquitous as Music Is Today” (WSJ) http://online.wsj.com/articles/carter-cleveland-says-art-in-the-future-will-be-for-everyone-1404762157

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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28th Mar 2014

What Makes Art Great?

Great Art is about showing what we cannot see, or did not see — and as such it is inspirational.

Great Art is also one of the most intimate forms of communication possible between two human beings, the artist and the viewer, as the viewer is able to see through the artist’s eyes.

As such, great art sells tickets – it is good box office. People want to see what the have not seen before or expand their vision of the world, plus we all crave honest intimacy.

Van Gogh showed human emotion where it usually does not seem to exist: in landscapes. We can see the world as van Gogh saw it and his work is personal, intimate and honest.

The ability to connect and share a personal vision that encompasses more that what we can normally see seems to be a hallmark or constant for great artists and art.

For instance, Cubism showed the other, unseen sides of a person or thing all at once. Only Superman, a fictional non-human has X-ray vision – the power to see beyond the front to the back. Yet Picasso, not only showed how to see in the-all-at-once way, he created intimate portraits of the women he loved and we can see them all-at-once thorough his works.

Physically, we can never fully see reality only with our eyes, even when corrected through scientific intervention, such as laser surgery, eyeglasses, telescopes or microscopes. For example, we can see the photographic pattern X-rays make, but our eyes cannot see x-rays, although they are there and therefore possible to physically perceive by a life form.

The range of colors that we see is really very limited. We know that other color vibrations, such as infrared, exist that we cannot see.

We cannot see atoms, and although experiments seem to prove their existence science continues to search for ways to more accurately show or prove their existence and that of particles.

However, what cannot be seen can be shown. It can be shown by illustrators and artists. Both create a physical visual representation of something. The difference is that the work of the artist is inspirational and intimate.

We cannot see the unconscious, but various Abstract Expressionists and Surrealists gave us impressions of it.

The shaman artists who painted in the caves, showed the visions that they saw in trances through their art. People were able to see other realities as if they saw through the eyes of their shaman.

Artists today are exploring ways of showing the scientific and spiritual unseen in nanoart, fractal art, UnGraven Image as well as continuing to evoke ideas with Conceptual and Word Art. The artists who will continue to be considered great will not only show these new realities, but do so in a way that is inspiring and intimate.

Great art inspires new ways of seeing ourselves and our world. It reaches beyond its historical context to communicate in the present. Hence, we are moved by Rembrandt, Da Vinci, Monet and other artists from different times than our own.

Marcel Duchamp put a urinal on display, entitled it “Fountain” and signed his work, R. Mutt he was fulfilling the role of the shaman-artist in a new way. Duchamp was daring us to see reality and art in a new way, making the heretofore profane holy as what is more profane than a urinal or more holy than art? The word “fountain” evokes metaphorical and mythological connotations of life and youth giving waters, plus references again religion as the work was first shown in France, a Catholic country where the churches all had fonts of holy water.

Since great art is personal and intimate it has to be honest and express the truth of the artist. Remember seeing a painting that was all blue of various shades. The artist had written that on the day when the painting was made he felt sad, blue, so to express himself he made this painting. It did express the artist’s feelings but it did not have a vision to communicate to the viewer. It was as intimate and honest as a child crying who wants her way, but it was not inspiring, only sad and common.

So a hallmark of great art is that it inspires the viewer to see the world in a new, unique way. The artist has something to communicate and manages to communicate it intimately.

A few years ago there was a show of van Gogh’s work at the Metropolitan Museum of art and I went on a cold and story winter day. The museum was packed it people and there was a waiting time of at least 45 minutes, with a line that snakes through floors and galleries on two levels. So, I decided to see some other work first. I found an interesting and free docent lecture about the Hudson River School with fewer than thirty other participants. I meandered through many uncrowded galleries and shows. As usual people were crowed in around the Met’s Monets and the Rembrandts, Cezanne, etc. There was no waiting at all at the galleries for the other special shows, all for renowned and critically acclaimed artists. Those shows were fairly empty and people moved along. When it became obvious the line was only growing longer, I joined it. There I overheard and chatted with strangers, many of whom had traveled into the city just to view this show, including teenagers on their own without an assignment, while others were returning for another viewing. The line was noisy but once we were allowed into full packed of rooms people spoke to each other in hushed voices if at all, except for the museum staff who occasionally shouted a plea with the viewers to move along, because many people, including me, would just stand before a work and just look and look.

It is almost kind of kinky to realize that there were whole roomfuls of people simultaneously having a personal, intimate experience with Vincent van Gogh, through his art.

Great art sells tickets, lots of tickets to blockbuster museum and even gallery shows – because people not only come, but then come again and again to be inspired and experience the intimacy of visual communication.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

<p>Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s <a href=”https://artofseeingthedivine.com”>Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. </a> You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. <a href=”https://artofseeingthedivine.com”>https://artofseeingthedivine.com</a></p>.

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09th Jan 2013

Does the Art Market Have More Than One Bubble?

The “art market” is like champagne; it is exciting, has bubbles and can make some people a bit giddy. Some of these champagne art bubbles can, and will, burst. That is the history of the art market, and as its history repeats itself, its future. We saw this happen when the French Academy favored the art stars of its day, refusing to allow in the group dubbed: Impressionists.  The ascending bubbles of many of the established Academy artists burst over time and their works sell today for far less than those of the then new and radical Impressionists who struggled to earn a living.

Currently in print and online an ever growing swarm of articles posit that the works the Modern and Contemporary artists whose works have reached the highest auction prices point the likelihood that the Art Market is a bubble that is about to burst.  Seems to me that the lessons of Western Art history are being avoided as carefully as the obvious pun on the reality that bubbles also “pop”, since the artists most maligned are actually Pop artists or related to Pop Art.  The artists most mentioned and in the cross-hairs of the controversy stirring art business writers are: Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst.

Andy Warhol Double Denied by Judy Rey Wasserman

Psalm 19 (Andy Warhol) Double Un-Denied by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Psalm 19

The history of the art market is damp with the many burst bubbles of various individual artists, as their contributions to the ongoing thrust of art history were reevaluated.  However, the entirety of the Art Market never burst, just the market for specific individual artists. The opposite is also true as the works of other, previously less well known artist became more revered and their prices increased. A good example of this would be the Barbizon artists who are credited with influencing the Impressionists and Post Impressionists.

Since the Renaissance successfully investing in art has always been elegantly simple and often quite financially accessible for the middle class as well as the very wealthy. All one needs to do is discover the next artist who will change the history of art and invest in him (or her) before they are finally discovered by the very rich, so their prices went up.

The history of Modern Art is full of true stories of now iconic ultra blue-chip artists were at first rejected because their work was too radical and different from what was popular until they came along.  Sensational or weird is often mistaken for radical — which means a new way of making or conceiving art – a different focus.

Monet, van Gogh, Kandinsky, Picasso, Pollack and Warhol are all artists who pioneered new and radical art, and ways of making art, in their own times.  Look back through the history of art and it can easily be seen that great artists are trailblazers, a risk takers, who contributed more than just a unique style that could later be built upon by another radical, trailblazing, risk taking artist.

There are many artists who are painting Impressionist works today. Some are fantastic – but they are not radical, not reformers, they are only elegantly plowing a previously well plowed field and the best make a good living. So, we do not revere their work. No risk.

Etched into art history are names of art dealers, such as Paul Durand-Ruel Ambroise Vollard, Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, Peggy Guggenheim, Irving Blum, and Leo Castelli, because they originally championed the works of artists mentioned previously – they risked.

Leo Castelli Deuteronomy 6 portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

Deuteronomy 6 (Leo Castelli) by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Deuteronomy 6

In a recent letter to the editor of the New York Times, entitled “Invitation to a Dialogue: An Art Market Bubble?” William Cole juxtaposed the 1971 the Metropolitan Museum of Art acquisition of Velázquez’s “Portrait of Juan de Pareja” for $5.5 million ($31.4 million in 2012 dollars), then the highest price ever paid for a work of art with the considerably higher prices (even when adjusted for inflation) reached at auction for the top selling Modern and Contemporary artists.

Museum curators know that some works are difficult to hang as they will “steal” the scene from the other works in the room.  Yet, as an artist, I can easily mention or imagine hanging an equally good work by Monet, van Gogh, Cezanne, Kandinsky, Picasso, Pollack and Warhol near Velázquez’s “Portrait of Juan de Pareja”, without anyone outrageously stealing the show.

 van Gogh Psalm 113 portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

Psalm 113 (Vincent van Gogh)  by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Psalm 113

Further, the behavior of collectors in 1971 in relation to a pre-modern masterwork does not reflect what such a work could sell for at auction today. There are exceedingly few masterworks by great artists that predate modern art that are available at auction. What might be relevant to the discussion is the recently rediscovered and authenticated Da Vinci “Salvator Mundi,” a 2-foot-high (0.6 meter) panel painting Christ, once owned by King Charles I, valued by dealers at a record $200 million.

Da Vinci, and almost all once radical, blue-chip scene stealing artists have one other thing in common. They have all inspired other later artists who in turn were radical, scene stealing and became or will become blue-chip artists. Both Koons and Hirst are influenced by Warhol. The question remains: what new, truly radical artist will be influenced by their works, if any? It is perhaps a bit soon to answer such a question.

The exhibit at the Metropolitan shows some of the many artists who have been influenced by Andy Warhol, and more artists, such as myself (armed with a manifesto) are now waiting in the wings.  As Eric Shiner, Director of The Andy Warhol Museum, noted in his letter-reply to the editor of the New York Times, “Warhol changed the visual vocabulary of the United States, and by extension the world, through his radical departure from preconceived notions of what art is, how it functions, and, yes, ultimately how it is sold, traded and collected.”

Recessions, depressions, inflations, or boon times can change the monetary worth of an individual masterpiece, since the value of the currency itself changes. Does the essential value of the Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Michelangelo’s David or Rembrandt’s The Night Watch really change based on the economy or currency valuation? Of course not.

While investors at auctions can make straws out of paper money to inflate or prop up the failing market for an artist who is clever but never truly art-radical, eventually whatever is only given shape by air (or gas) will burst or dissipate. Secondary galleries are littered with the works of artists from the nineteenth and early twentieth century who were well known in their time, but were not at the forefront of the movement they followed and never inspired the work of an artist that became blue chip. Quietly, one by one, those little bubbles burst as the prices for those artworks, when inflation is factored in, devalue in price.

The whole of the art market will not suffer, or decrease in value, because historically that is not what occurs. The market for individual artists burst. Sometimes, seemingly all at once due to financial conditions in the society, or because the new radical artists come along, the artists who only have style begin to seem less important or valuable.

Art history continues to be written by artists with radical new ideas, but the art market continues to be a version of history repeating itself.

Your comments are welcomed below.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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28th Nov 2012

What Art Would You Invest in with $5 million?

“If you had $5 million of cash you wanted to invest in artworks, what artists would you try to acquire?”, tweeted @ArtTactic, on November 26, 2012.

This Twitter account represents ArtTactic.com, which is a website that reports on art market news and analysis. Their tweets represent the website, often sharing a link to an article or reports. So, the majority of their followers are interested in the art market, and many are artists.

I’m @judyrey, also an artist. I quickly ReTweeted this great question, hoping to add to @ArtTactic‘s responses. What would others buy if they could, and why? Prompted by mu urging (as I was going to blog on the results), @arttactic tweet a new version of the next day, and then RT’d them again.

Including me, thirty-five people answered the question. According to their Twitter bios, the overwhelming majority of  are artists.

@ArtTactic retweeted (RT) all of the tweets, which helped me to count them, gather the data, and capture part of their Twitter stream for the image below. You can still answer the question by adding a comment below.

It is a boon for investors culling over this material that the answers are coming from artists here, not advisers or dealers, because genuine information from from this group is rare. Artists are not thought of as authorities on the art market — it is not their role.

Yet, artists who are revered or inspire many the next generation artists often end up as the next blue chip artists, so discovering who is influencing or revered by emerging artists is helpful investing  information. The current exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Regarding Warhol Sixty Artists, Fifty Years, attests to the importance of an artist’s influence. In case you have not been watching the recent art auctions, the prices of Warhol’s paintings continue to rise, making him one of the most expensive artists to collect.

Personally, I would have tweeted that I would buy a Warhol painting, if I wasn’t certain that $5 million would fail to bring one home to me.

So instead I Tweeted Johns, Kiefer and if I could also swing it a Twombly, even knowing that a significant Johns with numbers would wipe out my entire budget, if I was lucky enough to get a deal. I would need to acquire smaller works from each of these artists, if I collected all three with my $5 million.

Richter and Twombly tied for first place, with three mentions each. Second place, with two votes each, is a three way split between Kiefer, Koons and Lichtenstein.

Clearly some of the responses came from people who had no idea of what art by various artists, such as Monet, would really cost, or were not focused on what artists would be a good investment. Yet, no one mentioned Hirst, whose market is reported variously in the art news sources to have notably fallen from a peak prior to the recession. Of course, the prices for many mid-career artists fell at that time and have failed to fully recover, but Hirst is the one who is most above the radar. Yet, unlike Hirst, second place winners Koons, Kiefer and Twombly, who are all also represented by the Gagosian Gallery (@Gagosian), have seen prices for their works rise at auction.

Only one person thought of commissioning a work, Leonor Leite (@LeonorLeiteM), “With $5 million I would commission my own portrait by John Currin, (@BelmaczMayfair) would $5M be enough money? #Cheers”
kj @kjoftherock tweeted, “Any Modigliani, first. Van Gogh letter sketches next. Esp. Girl Near Stove Grinding Coffee.”

Since Vincent van Gogh always is my favorite artist and greatest artistic influence (his ideas) I would happily follow and revise my original idea, except I am not sure of the idea as a good investment. A safe investment for sure! But, will a sketch in a letter by van Gogh rise proportionately the way I believe a work by Jasper Johns will?

Below is a screenshot of the later Tweets. You can add your ideas in the comments.

If you had $5 million of cash you wanted to invest in artworks, what artists would you try to acquire?”

Note: A special thanks to Adam Green, who tweets for @ArtTactic and originated the tweet and by RTing the replies helped my gain the data for this blog.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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02nd Nov 2012

Mark Rothko Basic Essence Scripture Portrait

“Pictures must be miraculous.” — Mark Rothko

This Basic Essence Portrait portrait of Mark Rothko is created with strokes that are the original Torah font letters of Psalm 101 and Ecclesiastes chapters 1 and 2.

Mark Rothko’s work beguiled and confused and deeply effected me as a school girl and then college student studying art. I did not understand Abstract expressionism, or much like it. I wanted to dismiss it as art.

I wanted to move from move from DaDa, Expressionism, Surrealism, Cubism to Pop, ignoring the Abstract Espressionists, although I could admit that I did comprehend some worth in Pollack, Kline and Martin. But Rothko’s works kept tripping me up, grabbing me as I strove to walk past his large paintings and decimating all my theories and ideas about art.

This is because Rothko can always connect with me emotionally and has reduced me to tears, which as a girl I was embarrassed to show.

I see, but do not intellectually understand it, that Rothko paints raw emotion. Like Vincent van Gogh, who painted non-religious subjects but considered himself to be a religious or spiritual artist, Rothko showed me that narrative is not what makes a work of art depict the Divine.

For me, Rothko is one of the greatest religious artists who ever lived. I have not yet been to the Rothko Chapel, but it is on my bucket list.

Looking at Rothko’s sublime paintings, feeling depths of emotions I lost the need for the subject matter, the narrative image, to be what is most important about a work of art. I could never have developed a theory of art that asserts that the meaning of a painting is in its strokes without this lesson.

So as I work my way through my first series of Essence Portraits of artists who have influenced my art, and who I greatly admire, the seventh is Mark Rothko.

Portrait of Mark Rothko by Judy Rey Wasserman strokes are psalm 101 and Ecclesiastes 1 & 2

Mark Rothko basic Scripture Essence Portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman created with strokes that are the original Torah font letters of Psalm 101 and Ecclesiastes chapters 1 and 2.

“Art to me is an anecdote of the spirit, and the only means of making concrete the purpose of its varied quickness and stillness.” — Mark Rothko

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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