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06th Sep 2021

What Image Represents Rosh Hashanah?

The symbol that best represents Rosh Hashanah is the Shofar.

A shofar is a ram’s horn. Since ancient times it has been used as a trumpet.

Below is of a Shofar on a Sefer . Sefer is the Hebrew word for book. It shows the direct connection between the trumpet and the biblically commanded Rosh Hashanah festival

A shofar resting on a Bible. Strokes are (Strokes: Genesis 1, Deuteronomy 34.Genesis1, Deuteronomy 34
Shofar on Sefer by Judy Rey Wasserman

I did a search for Rosh Hashanah images or symbols. It turned up many images of foods, especially apples, honey, pomegranates, and round challahs (made to look like a crown. While it is customary to eat apples, especially dipped in honey to signify hoped for blessings of a sweet new year, and to eat pomegranates, which symbolize righteousness and knowledge, these foods are not unique to Rosh Hashanah. There are no biblical commandments to eat these foods, only yummy traditions.

Kara T.’s Rosh Hashanah Crown Challah served for our family Rosh Hashanah 2021

A challah in the shape of a crown is special for Rosh Hashanah, but challah is served on every shabbat, except during Passover, when we eat matzoh. While we’re on the subject, if there is one food that quintessentially represents a biblical Jewish holiday is has got to be Matzoh!

Just as we need matzoh (unleavened bread) for the festival of Passover, we need shofar blowing for Rosh HaShannah. Even one of the names for Rosh Hashanah is: The Feast of Trumpets!

The Feast of Trumpets always begins on the first day (at the new moon) of the seventh month. Its name comes from the command to blow trumpets (Leviticus 23:24; Numbers 29:1-6). Biblically, the number six is the number of Man. Thus, the first day of the seventh month signals that Mankind is created. It celebrates the sixth day of creation, the birth of humankind, with the creation of Adam and then Eve.

The Hebrew words we pronounce as “Rosh Hashanah” means the head of the year. It marks is beginning of the Jewish civil calendar. A new year, a time of reckoning of accounts and debts. This makes sense as it is harvest time. People in agricultural communities are reaping their crops. These is funding to pay the debts.

Shofar Cornucopia Psalm 136 verse 1 (Wishing a Sweet Year for Rosh Hashanah, colored) by Judy Rey Wasserman

Rosh Hashanah and the harvest festivals are also a time to settle other kinds of debts. It is a time of repentance to those we may have wronged and before Our God.

The blowing of the trumpets on first day of the month heralded a solemn time of preparation for the Day of Atonement; this preparation time is called “Ten Days of Repentance” or the “Days of Awe.” The shofar sounds an alarm of sorts and can be understood as a call to introspection and repentance. It calls each of us to pause and “hear” the still small voice.

See another of Judy Rey Wasserman’s Rosh Hashanah blog’s (also featuring a shofar image) at Rosh Hashanah

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Join the Art and Inspiration Newsletter now and receive our gift of a 8.5 x 11 inch printable of the above artwork Shofar Cornucopia. This Artwork features Psalm 136:1 . It is suitable for framing as a black and white art piece or personalize it as a coloring page! The PDF that you receive prints out to a standard 8.5 x 11 inches. This artwork can also be purchased from the Art of Seeing The Divine Shop/cornucopia , where you can learn more about it. You may also use the sidebar above on this blog to join the newsletter. Cornucopia offer expires Thanksgiving Day USA 2021

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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03rd Sep 2013

Rosh HaShannah Song Greetings

Rosh Hashannah Song with strokes from Aveinu Malkenu

The image above (without the greetings and blue box) is Rosh HaShannah Song, by Judy Rey Wasserman, 2013.

The small painting is created with pen and ink and watercolor pencils.

Strokes: Sofar and musical lines and blue coloring is created from the original Torah font Hebrew letters from the traditional Rosh HaShannah hymn,Aveinu Malkenu. The musical notes/apple’s strokes are the sounds of the shofar, red apples are T’qiah, green apple’s Sh’varim, and the yellow apple’s Teruah, all in Torah font Hebrew.

Rosh HaShannah Song is signed near the mouthpiece with my logo and signature, a self portrait created with the letters of my Hebrew name.

L’Shannah Tovah literally wishes the recipient a good year, the equivalent of “Happy New Year!”  The English greeting is a transliteration of the Hebrew words that also appear on the greeting above.

Since the time of Moses Rosh HaShannah has been Jesus, a Jews, including by Jesus and his original disciples and followers. Thus, it must be politically correct to wish all of my Jewish friends and family and all of my Christian friends and family who follow Jesus, plus, anyone else who would like to benefit from good wishes, a happy, healthy and sweet new year!  L’Shannah Tovah!

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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06th Sep 2021

Art & Inspiration Newsletter

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Shofar Cornucopia Psalm 136:1 (Black and White) by Judy Rey Wasserman

Join the Art and Inspiration Newsletter  now and receive our gift of a 8.5 x 11 inch printable of the above artwork Shofar Cornucopia. This Artwork features Psalm 136:1 . It is suitable for framing as a black and white art piece or personalize it as a coloring page! The PDF that you receive prints out to a standard 8.5 x 11 inches. This artwork can also be purchased from the Art of Seeing The Divine Shop, where you can learn more about it.

Offer expires Thanksgiving Day USA  2021 

Shofar Cornucopia for Rosh Hashanah (Colored) by Judy Rey Wasserman

The above image is an example of the Shofar Cornucopia colored-in with a greeting for Rosh Hashanah. In the basic image there is plenty of room for you to write your own greeting for any fall holiday or festival, including Thanksgiving.

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12th Dec 2017

Tree of Light — 2017

Maybe it’s a coincidence that the Festival of Light, Hanukah, falls closely with and in some years, falls on the winter solstice. Maybe a coincidence, but in the Hebrew Testament there is no word for “coincidence”.

Christian scholars assure us that Jesus (in Hebrew, Yeshua) was definitely not born near the time of the winter solstice.  The Greek Testament tells us that Joseph and Mary were on their way to Jerusalem, a pilgrimage to the Temple that Jews took at Passover and for the Holy Days of Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur and Sukkot.  The Early Church, and especially the Holy Roman Church of the early middle ages, created a holiday called “Christmas” to coincide with and compete for audience share with pagan celebrations of the solstice.

Hanukah, the Festival of Light, is not found in the Hebrew Testament, also called the Tanakh. The story of Hanukah is found in the Apocrypha, which is a non-canonical collection of writings. The true story of the Macabees and the miracle of eight days of light occurred during the time between the two testaments.

Hanukah is what is called a “rabbinic” holiday. This means it is not a holiday that must be observed according to Mosaic Law from the Bible. Passover, which becomes Easter in Christianity and Shavuot, which becomes Pentecost are examples of biblically commanded holidays. The early Christians celebrated Hanukah, especially the Jewish followers of Jesus celebrated Hanukah, known also as the Feast of Dedication, in John 10:22.

Basic theology from both testaments confirms and encourages our bringing light into the world, especially during dark times. Stemming from Genesis 1, when the LORD G- D first created light (and by that light saw that it was good/tov).  We give thanks for the miracle of Light that came and is in our world and lives and the miracle of the light that miraculously sustains us in our times of darkness.

Plus, we, as the observant children of the Creator, are encouraged to follow His example (as best we can). We light lights, we give gifts of charity and kindness.

In Western Jewish and Christian cultures, this holiday time is a season of light – but it is also a season of trees.

As described in the Bible, a menorah is a kind of image of a tree, often ornamented, that holds individual burning lamps, or candles, and more recently even electric lights. A Christmas tree is a real tree or some version of a tree (realistic or abstract) that is decorated with ornaments and in the past candles, but now usually electric lights.

Hanukah is very popular joyous holiday of gift giving, singing special songs, and enjoying special rich foods, and candy. Christians, followers of Jesus, are following His (and His early disciples’ example) by lighting when they Christmas trees, giving gifts, singing carols, and dining on special rich foods, and candy on Christmas.

The artwork below, Tree of Light – 2017, is a colored in coloring page, both by me, Judy Rey Wasserman. Is it a Hanukah menorah – or a Christmas tree?  We celebrate together!

The words on the tree are KJV translation of 2 Samuel 22:29. You can see that text cited on the base of the tree.

The un-colored coloring page follows with a direct link to a printout PDF of the page itself – a special holiday gift from me to you – but only from Hanukah eve through Christmas night 2017.  After that the link will be removed.


Hoilday Tree of Light. Is it a Menorah or a Christmas tree?
In 2018, a coloring book for adults, created with psalms, will be published and available for you on Amazon.  The coloring page below is a kind of taste test for you that is available via the link to a PDF that will immediately open up below. Save to your device and print on 8.5 x 11 paper. The link will only be active and work from Hanukah eve through Christmas night 2017.

Is is a menorah or a Christmas tree , or both? You decide by the colors you use.

Whoever you are, however you celebrate the festivals of the miracle of Light brought into and overcoming darkness, enduring blessings, and renewed Dedication, I pray you are blessed with light, love and peace.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Judy Rey’s adult coloring book featuring psalms will be published in 2021.

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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23rd Dec 2014

Tis the Season to Light Trees

Often Christmas and Hanukkah coincide as Hanukkah is celebrated for eight full days. At this time of year, we seem to have a communal need to celebrate and light lights, perhaps due to the longest winter days in the Northern Hemisphere.

Driving in the early evening, each night seems to bring more yards that have trees and decorations of lights. Those who celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah and/or Kwanza are all busy lighting one kind of tree or another.

Candle Tree

Tis the Season to Light Trees by Judy Rey Wasserman

A menorah, whether for Chanukah with eight candle holders or for Temple and Shabbat with seven candle holders is always biblically symbolic of a tree. Of course, the more recent holiday of Kwanza also features a menorah.

Historically, Christmas trees began with Northern European pagans, long before the spread of Christianity. It seems the lighting of trees and the yearly festivities were associated with the winter solstice. Just as the church incorporated and substituted saints and their days for the various non-Christian gods thus enabling conversion, so too did the church incorporate the winter holiday by claiming it as the celebration of Jesus’ birth. Based on the gospel account of Mary and Joseph sojourning to Jerusalem to pay their tribute, we know that Jesus had to have been born either in the spring during the time of Shavout/Pentecost or in the fall during Rosh HaShanna (celebrating the birth of humankind) or Yom Kippur.

We also know historically that although “a great miracle happened here” at the time that Judah Macabee and his men managed to keep the synagogue lights lit and fend off the invaders. This victory and the miracle of the Temple lights remaining lit for eight days when in reality there was only enough oil for one day’s light, led to Hanukkah being referred to as the feast of dedication. The gospels tell of Jesus celebrating this holiday, also called the Feast of Dedication, which remains one of celebrating the overthrow of tyranny and the freedom to practice one’s religion.

Ironically, the victorious Hasmonians (Macabees) were very liberal and their rule led to the acceptance of many Roman ways, which eventually led to uprisings by the more traditional Jews against the Romans around the time of Jesus. Of course, this led to the Diaspora.

Hanukkah is considered a minor holiday and no one takes off from work or school. Yet, in the USA , it is the most celebrated Jewish Holiday just as Christmas is the most celebrated Christian holiday. We all light trees give gifts, party and eat rich foods.

Although the colors of blue, white and gold represent Hanukkah while green, white and red represent Christmas in wrappings, cards and decorations, in actuality we are all lighting many colored lights. Christmas lights tend to be multicolored or all white and glowing. Hanukkah candles, the ones in all those little boxes from various manufacturers that fit the standard menorahs are likewise multicolored, while Shabbat candles are white (and at least one Friday night always falls during Hanukkah).

The image of the Candle Tree 2007 (AKA: “Tis the Season to Light Trees” card) is both a Hanukkah menorah and/or a Christmas tree. I have found that Jews immediately seem to see it as a menorah while Christians miss that imagery and see a Christmas tree. So each sees the image as a special holiday image, but we filter the meaning through our beliefs and assumptions. In the image the tree has nine candles as the center candle is the shamash, the candle that lights the others..

I had a large unfolded card printed of the image that I am using as my Seasons Greetings mailing this year. It is included here, with best wishes for many blessings for you, and your loved ones.

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. ungravenimage.com.
Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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24th Sep 2014

Happy 5775 New Year and Birthday to You!

The Biblically commanded holiday of Rosh HaShannah celebrates the creation of Adam, the first human. As such it is understood as the birth of humankind, making it a kind of second birthday that you and I share. We all share this birthday, whatever religion, faith, creed or ideas that we each follow.

Currently, Jews and some Christians observe the holiday of Rosh HaShanna.  Yet in the Bible it is clear that this is a festival for everyone including the “stranger”, the neighbor, living in the midst of the Jews and the other tribes of Israel.

The words translate to Head (rosh) of the (ha) year (shanna). Like in English, the Hebrew word: “rosh”, means head like the one on your neck and also at the front, as in head of the class.

The Biblical name for this holiday is Yom Teruah. This translates to Day (yom) of raising noise, inherently a loud noise like a shout (teruah), and is referred to as the feast of Trumpets.

The trumpet used is a shofar, which is a ram’s horn.  It is a blast for the coronation of a king and also recalls the substitution of a ram, for Jacob as a sacrifice by Abraham. A total of 100 blasts from a shofar are made on each day of the festival.

Among the other Rosh Hashanah observances is the eating of an apple dipped in dipped in honey, to symbolize the hope for a new year of sweetness.

In the image above the apples bob as the notes of the shofar blast. All of the artistic strokes in this image are the Torah font letters from the Hebrew hymn, Aveinu Malkenu.  Aveinu Malkenu means:  Our Father, our King. This hymn is prominently sung during synagogue services on Rosh HaShannah.

Rosh HaShannah Song with strokes from Aveinu MalkenuRosh HaShannah Song, 2013. Strokes are the Torah font letters of the hymn, Aveinu Malkenu

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vPost Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. ungravenimage.com.
Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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14th Jul 2010

Finding Good Art at Art Hamptons 2010

The Art Hamptons fair continues to grow and evolve. This year it showcased $300 million in art from 95 galleries from around the world, according to Rick Friedman, Founder and Executive Director of the show.

The announcement by Scope Hamptons that it would skip this year, no doubt aided Art Hamptons, which for the past two years has reigned as the tony area’s only art fair.

Visually, it is an interesting show as cutting edge emerging contemporary mixes with blue chip artists; and galleries from Asia, Latin America and Europe go toe to toe with local galleries; plus prices range from $2,000.00 to $2 million. Plus, this year’s fair is a carbon-neutral event, an achievement that deserves mention.

Friedman smartly schedules his fair to coincide with other important Hamptons art events, such as the Parrish Art Museum’s Midsummer Party, which occurs the weekend following the July 4 th weekend.

This year’s Lifetime Achievement Award went to artist Donald Sultan, a Sag Harbor resident. The Mary Ryan Gallery held an exhibit of Sultan’s work in their booth.

When I attend fairs, I know I will blog on what I appreciate because I like to share good art and news with my readers who are now often also my friends on sites such as Twitter and Facebook. There is not time or room in a blog to mention everything, but what follows is some of the best of what I found.

Early on in my trek through the fair, I was looking for Caren Golden and here gallery as I always enjoy seeing her and the Caren Golden Fine Art gallery’s artists, which I have mentioned in past blogs. I was well rewarded as I found work by Devorah Sperber , an artist whose work I first saw at the gallery’s booth at a Pulse fair. By then I had my limit of images fort hat blog, but now I have the opportunity to share one here. What you are seeing is spools of thread, used as strokes to create a portrait of Marilyn Monroe.

Devorah Sperber’s Marilyn 2, 2009

I’ve enjoyed shows and openings at Denise Bibro Fine Art in Chelsea and was happy to see this booth. I wanted to include some work by Jerry Meyer, but although Denise graciously offered to allow me to use an image here, due to my blog’s size constraints, I knew the important details would not be easily visible here. In THE HIT PARADE , Meyer presents a kind of juke box display that riffs on senior citizens. Song selections include: By the Hardening of the Arteries band- “Killing Me Softly”, by the Al Zymer and his Orchestra—“Where Did I Put the Car Keys?”, and by Lust to Dust—“I Left My Libedo in Toledo”.

It was fun to chat with local artist James Kennedy, whose was on view at the booth of the Surface Library II, in East Hampton.

As an artist, always enjoy meeting other artists. It was also good to meet Fedele Spadafora who was accompanying his art.

Gallerist Lisa Cooper of Elisa Contemporary Gallery donates a portion of every sale to philanthropic organizations that serve children and families through art. Currently the gallery supports Free Arts NYC and Creative Arts Workshops for kids. It was a pleasure meeting Lisa and seeing the art in her booth.

At Consorcio de Arte there were wonderfully lyrical new all white collage paintings by Paula Rivero, which would be included here, except the constraints of a smallish jpeg image cannot do them justice, as the texturing is what sets this work apart. Thanks to Solange Guez , Co-Director of the gallery, who took me into a separate room to see more of this exciting artist from Argentina.

A.I.R. Gallery was founded in 1972 as the first all women’s gallery in the United States. You do not need to know that to be drawn into their booth by the quality of the art they show. I enjoyed meeting gallery director Kat Griefan and Simone Meltesen, executive assistant.


Daria Dorosh’s Follow the Patter, Scene II

At last year’s fair images by and of Andy Warhol seemed to be everywhere. Although one can almost always find a reference to Warhol at any fair that includes secondary market galleries, this year the splendid glut was gone. However, a wonderful photograph that features Andy and Edie Sedgewick at Tulla Booth Gallery ‘s booth sated my Warhol hunger. Tulla is a charming lady who shows top notch fine art photography in her Sag Harbor gallery.

I enjoyed the work at Tria‘s booth where I discovered work by Casey Voyt, especially “They Came to Snuff the Rooster”. It was delightful to meet gallerists Carol Suchman and Paige Bart who are friendly and helpful. This gallery also supports various arts charities.

This year Mark Humphrey Gallery, hailing from my hometown of Southampton had a booth, which featured prints by Alex Katz, Damien Hirst and Roy Lichtenstein.

Silas Marder Gallery, a young local gallery that the Art Hampton’s fair was represented by a wall—no need for more considering the gallery is actually located next door to the site of the fair!

Moscow’s Galustyan Gallery introduces Russian artists to the world and international artists to Russia. Their booth had a mystical work by Robert Bery, who has helped in a legal fight to protect and extend the rights on NYC Street Artists.

Alexander Calder’s Fish and Faces, 1976

Mark Borghi Fine Art‘s booth is both last and first for me at this fair. Situated at the fair’s entrance i sets the bar. It is also always the last booth I visit, even though using an exit would be more convenient. I double back because I want to refresh my eyes and hold the vision of the works I see there as I leave the fair. Among the Modern Art treasures was an Alexander Calder that delights me with its playfulness and I hope it will do the same for you. In addition to gallery’s in NYC and LA, Mark Borghi maintains a year round gallery on Main Street in Bridgehampton, which has quiet little shows that can rival what is at the local museums in quality.

All images used courtesy of the galleries.

The Art Hamptons fair continues to grow and evolve. This year it showcased $300 million in art from 95 galleries from around the world, according to Rick Friedman, Founder and Executive Director of the show.

The Art Hamptons fair continues to grow and evolve. This year it showcased $300 million in art from 95 galleries from around the world, according to Rick Friedman, Founder and Executive Director of the show.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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18th Oct 2009

Fall Tree Aleph – (Deuteronomy 6)

Fall Tree Aleph is created of the original letters of Deuteronomy 6. These include the famous Shema, which all observant Jews, since the time of Moses (thus including John the Baptist, Jesus and the disciples) pray every morning and evening.

“Hear Oh Israel , the LORD your God, the LORD is one” – the Shema, Deut. 6:4

Deuteronomy 6 also includes another daily prayer, also said since the time of Moses: the Vahavta.

 

The Vahavta instructs, “And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might.”

Fall Tree Aleph is part of a mini series within the Trees of Life series called “Seasons of Trees.” It is the tree that represents autumn, as religiously significant time for Jews and the early Jewish-Christians.

Known as the High Holy Days, this spiritual season begins with Rosh Hashanah. The Hebrew word “Rosh” means “Head” and the literal translation is “head of the year.”

This New Year holiday commemorates the beginning or birth of Man, specifically Genesis’ Adam.

Fall Tree Aleph by Judy Rey Wasserman uses the original letters of Deuteronomy 6 for all the strokes.

 

Fall Tree Aleph

Seasons of Trees series

by Judy Rey Wasserman

Christian scholars believe that Jesus was born either during the fall celebrations or the ones in the spring as that was when Jews headed to Israel,  plus there were astronomical events that are believed to have possibly been the Star of Bethlehem. The majority of scholars believe that Jesus was born in the fall.

As the Son of Man the birth of Jesus on the eve of Rosh Hashanah makes theological sense from a Jewish-Christian perspective. Being born at that time would have been meaningful to Herod, who was a Jew and would have understood the possible ramifications for such a time of birth for the real heir of David’s throne. Frankly, if one were doing PR for the baby Jesus such a birthday could not be beat for Jews who awaited a messiah and also a resurrection of the kingship of David’s lineage, overturning Roman rule, and also Herod.

The most sacred and solemn day of the Jewish calendar is Yom Kippur, a day of fast and communal repentance. It follows after Rosh Hashanah by a ten days.

A week later is Sukkot, also known as the feast and festival of Booths. It recalls the time the Tribes of Israel dwelt in tents (booths) in the desert. Temporary tents are erected where families and communities enjoy festive meals.

Thanksgiving is similar in many ways to Sukkot. Both are about the gathering of families in communal festive meals that celebrate the harvest but also an successful ending to a difficult period. While American Thanksgiving illustrations depict Pilgrims and Algonquin people sharing a meal, I have often wondered if they had erected temporary tents using skins or clothes as the weather was probably cooler and could turn inclement.

Thus the fall festivals are communal occasions.

The text of the Vahavta points strongly to family and community as it instructs followers, “And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be upon thy heart; and thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thy house, and when thou walkest by the way …”

Then it goes on to personalize one’s relationship to the commandments, “…and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up.”

In other words, ponder and communicate, in thought, word and deed our love of the Lord with all love the LORD with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might., everywhere and always, thus influencing others by example while gaining personal growth.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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