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15th Oct 2021

What is Fine Art?  How is it a Good Investment?

Fine Art is a form of inspirational and/or aesthetically appreciated visual communication that can always be understood as a kind of investment.

Fine Art is Always an Investment for its Owner.

All fine art, from an image hastily cut from a magazine or a fuzzy pixelated copy printed from a jpeg (for instance a framed image of the Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa hanging on the wall of an RV) to a famous masterpiece painting by a world-renowned Renaissance artist for instance Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa owned by and hanging in the Louvre Museum is an investment for its owner-collector. In other words, whatever a person conceives as being art may be an investment for that person.

Can a Person Who Owns a Magazine Image of the Mona Lisa

be Considered an Investor?

The Mona Lisa is said to be the most famous, most recognized painting in the world. Chances are then that you, dear reader, have seen the Mona Lisa, or at least a photograph or image of some sort of the Mona Lisa. At the first mention of the Mona Lisa above, perhaps an image, a memory of the Mona Lisa came to mind. If this is true for you, then at some point, consciously or unconsciously, willingly, or unwillingly you spent at least a moment of you time looking at an image of the Mona Lisa

Art – any art that a person sees is always investment in time and attention. The investment of one’s time may be intentional or unintentional. Whatever, eyeballs on art – viewing art – is always an investment of time, which is life.

We are bombarded by art daily, or at least various forms of images that others may consider to be visual art, even fine art. Thanks to the internet, social media, digitized books, magazines, advertisements, plus readily and even freely available printed materials, we see more fine art than any individual, including artists, gallerists, museum curators, art historians, powerful and rich people, etc., ever has been able to view prior to the mass use of PCs and cell phones.

Everyone who has a memory of the Mona Lisa has invested space and energy in their brains’ visual cortexes to the image. The memory may be purposefully kept because it’s a famous painting that educated people recognize, so not remembering it could influence others to think one an ignoramus, otherwise to impress others or fit in, or because the painting was personally inspiring. One of the hallmarks of fine art is that people want to remember it. They have memory of it that they want to keep.

We can choose to invest in seeing fine art, even some of the world’s greatest fine art using our devices via the Internet. In recent years many internationally recognized museums have uploaded their collections. This is a good way to invest in fine art – not financially, of course – and it expands your memories and visual understandings.

The person who owns a framed magazine image of the Mona Lisa has also invested some space to the Mona Lisa. This might be wall space or space in a scrapbook or file. Want to invest your time in seeing much more of the Mona Lisa in a new way? Check out the Louvre’s online Mona Lisa app:  https://www.louvre.fr/en/what-s-on/life-at-the-museum/the-mona-lisa-in-virtual-reality-in-your-own-home

Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci
Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci

Why is Fine Art considered valuable?

Fine art is valuable because the memory of it gives us a new way of seeing the world. It literally expands our vision.

How? Scientists and doctors who focus on vision tell us that 90% of vision does not happen through the eyes but via the brain as it compares memories of visual impressions of light to the impressions of light the eyes are currently sending. We see through our memories.

Great artists give us new ways to see by creating new visual communications – that may at first be slightly difficult, or at least novel to see. We may not actually like or “get” the work of a renowned artist when we are first introduced to their art. This new-to-us art does not exactly fit previous visual memories. Art works may be too sumptuous to fit our day-to-day memories, for instance the paintings by Leonardo da Vinci, John Paul Rubens, or Rembrandt; or the sculptures of Michelangelo, Bernini, or Rodin. Other works may be difficult to see at first because they are too brutish or abstracted, such as paintings by Goya, Mondigliani, or Rothko; or the sculptures of Brâncu?i, Giacometti, or Henry Moore.

Even in our time, it is not necessarily easy to visually grasp the Mona Lisa in person, no less from a photograph. This is especially true for the viewer who is used to seeing the work of other famous painters in museums.

Among his many other achievements, Leonardo da Vinci was a pioneering fine art painter who invented new ways of painting and using different types of paint. Da Vinci studied optics, how we see. His understandings led him to create and perfect a technique known as sfumato. This technique broke dramatically with the painting tradition of outlining figures. The Mona Lisa herself, and the background that surrounds her kind of vanishes at the edges due to the artistic blending of shadows and colors. Mona Lisa’s gaze seems to follow the viewer as the viewer moves from one side of the painting to the other. Even more startling, when the viewer stands directly in front of the Mona Lisa she seems to lose her famous smile! Da Vinci understood modern findings that our eyes are less suited to process and pick up shadows directly. However, our peripheral vision can see shadows well. Thus, moving slightly to either side revels the Mona Lisa’s smile from the carefully blended (sfumato) shadows at the sides of the portrait’s eyes and lips.

Seeing the Mona Lisa painting inspires our vision to see our world in a new way, including seeing art itself in a new way. When a work of art inspires many people it is recognized as fine art, and it becomes inordinately valuable. If it continues to inspire generation to come it grows in prestige and value. The Mona Lisa is the most financially valuable painting in the world based as valued by its insurance.

What About Fine Art as a Financial Investment?

It’s conventional, trite but true to advise that all financial investments should be well considered as they always involve risk. If there is a sure thing, from betting on a horse, to buying investment products (like stocks or EFTs), or collecting fine art, probably something illegal taking place in the background.

In Contemporary art there is no such thing as a guarantee that collecting the work of any artist will reap financial rewards. What is popular with current collectors may not inspire future generations.

In the history of Western Art, since the Renaissance, there have been artists who were popular, even renowned who have since faded into the background. Patrons would commission a portrait for posterity, but their second and third plus generations of heirs later regretted that great great granddad had not selected an artist who was scorned at the previous time for the commission.

An easy example of this were the artists who were popular and given commissions by wealthy patrons at the annual Salon of the Royal Academy of Art in the 1860s in Paris, France. At that time being accepted to show in the Salon meant gaining commissions and a secure livelihood for any artist. With the exceptions of Manet and Morisot (and only once a small Monet landscape small basically hidden in the display), the Salon refused to show the works of the artists who became known as Impressionists.

In 1863, in response to the complaints about the number of rejections from the Salon, French Emperor Napoleon III created the first exhibition of the Salon des Refusès, to include works by those refused by the Salon jury. Yet it lacked the significant commissions of the Salon. Many of the works by those to be associated with the Impressionist movement were exhibited there.

In 1874, 30 artists banded together to show their work without the sanction of the government and without a jury. They named themselves the Sociètè Anonyme des Artistes Peintres, Sculpteurs, Graveurs, etc., and staged their exhibition in the former studio of the photographer Nadar (Gaspard Mix Tournachon) in Paris. The group included Paul Cèzanne, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Berthe Morisot, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Alfred Sisley. It was about this time that the name “Impressionist” was coined by an art critic responding to one of Monet’s landscape paintings, Impression, Sunrise. The name was originally meant as a derogatory term, but it was soon adopted by the painters, and by 1877 they were using it as an identifier of their style and their exhibitions.

Generally, based on similar conditions of size, materials and condition of the artwork, the works of the artists who were selected to show in the then prestigious Salon pales in today’s financial value n comparison with paintings made by the Impressionists at that same time. If great great granddad had commissioned or bought a painting from Renoir, Monet, or Pissarro, and it was held by your family until today, then you would be quite wealthy. If not, there would only be an amusing family story about how great great grandad blew an amazing financial opportunity.

Of course, while financially investing in Contemporary artists is a safer bet than going to Las Vegas and playing craps, the best art investment is in the art that is proven over centuries to inspire people. Those works, like the ones of the artists named in this article are beyond the financial reach anyone but the very wealthy, blue-chip corporations and museums.

Contemporary Fine Art Investing Advice

First find a contemporary artist, not an artwork, and invest in that artist’s work(s).

From the artists you decide to invest in, only collect original works, or signed and numbered limited edition works that you acquire directly from the artist or a reputable dealer.

Gallerists, and some collectors advise based upon the current art market’s preferences. The “best” contemporary galleries generally represent the artists whose works currently sell for the highest prices. That means that buying works of those artists may be the safest or least safe and dreadful investment. Prices for art that are skyrocketing up, can also tumble down as tastes change with new generations.

Most every gallerist or art advisor will tell you to buy what you like – what you want to see daily on your walls. Well, probably waking up to see art like one of Goya’s monsters on your walls will not be pleasant, but only buying what you like gives you dull art that is only coddling. Art that evokes a happy memory at the seashore may or may not be great art. Does the artist give you new visual understandings, or inspire you like a Monet, or Dufy did in their day? Find such an artist if you want the best possible investment. Only then select the artwork(s) for your walls.

Look for these criteria before investing in fine art for financial gain:

  1. Does the artist have something strikingly brand new to visually communicate to you, and possibly to others in our time? Does the work communicate something new and meaningful to you? Do you feel connected to the artist somehow (assuming you have not met)? Do you feel closer to truth? To the Divine? To somehow better understanding of who you are? Of some kind of truth about life?
  2. Do not buy immediately, upon first seeing any contemporary artwork! Even my artworks! Go home from the brick-and-mortar gallery or internet gallery. Live a few days of your life – or even weeks. Do you find yourself thinking about the artwork itself? Remembering it. Are you in a good way being moved by it (and not moved only by the possible deal or money you could make)? Are you moved in some way by other works by this artist? [Note: If you saw only one artwork by the artist make sure you investigate and see other works by the artist, online or in person.]
  3. Would you recommend seeing that artwork, or artist’s works to a friend the way you would recommend a good book, show, song, or other type of creative expression that moved you?
  4. Does the art seem important enough to you that you want to support the artist, by giving that artist money, as this is basically what you are doing when collecting contemporary art.
  5. Would you happily purchase an expensive ($50.00+) full color coffee table sized art book of the artist’s work because you know you would enjoy just looking at the excellent photos of the work in private moments?
  6. Given a choice, do you want that piece of art to live in your brain or would you feel diminished if you forgot it?

My favorite artist has been Vincent van Gogh since the time I was a tot being pushed along in a stroller at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. It was the first time I stood up in my stroller to better see the painting before me. I fussed when my Dad tried to move along to see other works. Although van Gogh was greatly renowned, his art was a discovery for me. This was the moment I learned to love what art was and could do for my life. Van Gogh’s work continues to strongly communicate to me, and apparently many other people to this day. As a tot, my parents couldn’t give a painting by van Gogh, so as soon as I discovered there were art books with good images of his works, that became my ongoing gift request. I introduced my younger cousins, my son, and my granddaughter to van Gogh. So, my answers to the above questions in relation to Vincent van Gogh is a resounding: Yes!

In his lifetime Vincent van Gogh sold only one painting. The critics were unkind or ignored him. If you ancestor had gone to the gallerists or shows of the day no art advisor or fellow patron would have advised collecting van Gogh, except for van Gogh’s brother Theo, who failed to sell his works, but did sell the works of other artists who were considered less strange. Strange can be revolutionary, which means new – or just simply strange because it’s dreadful. Van Gogh’s art was waiting to be discovered by collectors who began to collect the prior and previously revolutionary and strange works of the Impressionists. Van Gogh is considered a Post-Impressionist.

My answers are the same for other artists, including da Vinci. I have personally stood in front of the Mona Lisa and remain inspired by that memory. Yes, I also have art books about Leonardo da Vinci. I would hate to lose my memories of his works.

Review the above list considering your answers to the questions in relation to one of your favorites all time artists. Your emotional responses to the questions regarding your favorite artist(s) can help lead you to discover potential contemporary artists that may be worth your investment.

Again, investing in anything financially or with your time and attention, including art, always involves commitment and risk. What you look at becomes memory and we see through our memories.

Psalm 113 Vincent van Gogh portrait
Psalm 113 Vincent van Gogh’s Essence Portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

See more about the Vincent van Gogh Psalm 113 portrait above at (Click –>): https://ungravenimage.com/blog/?s=Vincent+van+Gogh

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Change the way you see the world through art mage of the Word. Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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01st Oct 2021

How to See an Image of the Song of Songs

Solomon’s Song of Songs is known as the love song of the Bible. Like the psalms, it was chanted in biblical times and continues to be chanted and sung in synagogues today. It symbolizes our love story with G-D, both personally and as a people. Thus, the title, “Song of Songs.”

How to Turn the Song of Songs into an Image?

In Genesis chapter 1, the Creator speaks the physical universe into being. According to basic theology held by all branches and denominations of Jews and Christians, the letters of those Hebrew words are the basis – the smallest initial components of the physical universe.

Twenty first century elementary physicists discovered that most basic and tiniest building blocks –the basis of the physical universe present as either pre-mass units or energy units.  They call these “strings”. There are amazing parallels between only one font in the world, the Hebrew Torah font of the Bible, and the strings of elementary physics. These correlations can be seen in a short video, Painting with the Big Bang of Genesis, available on ungravenimage.com, the sidebar of this blog, and You Tube, plus it’s completely explained in The Manifesto of Post Conceptual UnGraven Image ArtA Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Strokes.

So, how to turn the Song of Songs into an image? By using the original Torah font Hebrew letters of Song of Songs as each stroke to create the image of the Swan Lovers artwork. This visually represents the biblical theology, plus the concept of strings as the basis of physical reality.

The strokes are used in the ways traditional artists use strokes, they are overlapped, interwoven, and used as glazes. Here and there a letter “peeks” out, but even people who can easily read the Hebrew cannot read the scripture texts. The strokes also mimic the invisible-to-us strings that are smaller than atoms, which link together to form atoms and then compounds, overlapping, interweaving, and layering together to form our dimension of the physical universe.

Why use Swans to Portray Song of Songs?

Close up of multi colored version of Swan Lovers (Song of Songs) by Judy Rey Wasserman. The strokes are all the original Torah font letters from Song of Songs.

Swans can mate for life – usually. A small percentage of the time they break up, or stray. The numbers for this behavior are at around 3% for swans that have successfully bred and around 9% for those birds yet to breed or have had a failed breeding season. They can reunite and resume their relationship that then lasts a lifetime.

“I am my beloved’s, and my beloved is mine…”  — Song of Songs 6:3

Swan Lovers Song of Songs by Judy Rey Wasserman. The strokes in this black and white version are all the original Torah font letters from Song of Songs.

How is Swan Lovers Created with Scripture?

In its essential form, in black and white, this artwork shows a loving and romantic pure white swan couple. The entire image was created using only strokes that are the original Torah font letters from the complete Song of Songs, chapters 1-8.

The multi-colored version of Swan Lovers is additionally painted with watercolor pencils. Using watercolor pencils allows me to write the Torah font letters from the scriptures. Then I go over them with a wet paint brush, also using brushes loaded with water to “write” more scripture verses on the waters. Writing with the wet brush allows the pigments from the colored pencils to flow out.

Close up of multi colored version of Swan Lovers (Song of Songs) by Judy Rey Wasserman. The strokes are all the original Torah font letters from Song of Songs.

The water’s colors are created with scripture letter-strokes of blues and greens. The birds’ beaks use letter-strokes of orange with shading of reds and pinks. The feathers are shaded with cool violet hues.  

“Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth: for thy love is better than wine.” – Song of Songs 1:2

Do you believe in the Power – Transforming – Power of Scripture?

Swan Lovers Song of Songs by Judy Rey Wasserman. The strokes in this multi-colored version are all the original Torah font letters from Song of Songs.

The romantic artwork of Swan Lovers (Song of Songs) romantic artwork is more than inspirational art. Since it is created only of the Song of Song scripture it is a way to bless a couple’s relationship. Hang it in the bedroom or the hallway leading to the bedroom. It can bless your home, or it can be an appreciated gift for the home blessing an engaged or newly married couple. It also makes a loving anniversary gift, or romantic gift for your sweetheart.

“He brought me to the banqueting house, and his banner over me was love. Song of Songs 2:4

Bring home this scripture wall art home today via the shop at https://artofseeingthedivine.com/product/swan-lovers-song-of-songs-written-on-the-wind-series/

See more now. Live inspired.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Sign up for the newsletter & mailing list below!

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31st Oct 2014

How are Bitcoin, the Bible & Art Related?

Any image of a crypto currency coin is a fantasy, even if it is a logo, since crypto currencies do not exist in real coin form. That is intrinsic to crypto currencies. Basically they can be understood as digital mathematical equations that have been solved and exist on a blockchain, which is also found only via the Internet.  Bitcoins and other crypto currencies are conceptual money.

The artwork shown here (below) is my Essence Portrait (basic image) of a Bitcoin.  It is a part of my In God We Trust art series, and its new Money Project.

Fiat currencies, those issued by a government have always had a physical form. Usually the artwork shown on a coin or bill has political relevance and reinforced the ideas of the country’s culture.  Fiat currencies that you may know or use are called:  dollars, Euros, British sterling, yen, pesos, marks and shekels, etc.  These forms of currency used to be backed by gold or silver, but none are backed by anything other than their governments strength and credit today.

Since neither fiat currencies nor crypto currencies are backed by any precious metal or other commodity, it is very simple to transfer their value between companies and individuals electronically and digitally. For example when you use a debit card to make a purchase the numerical value of that purchase is subtracted from your account and added to the accounts of the merchant and processing company. Actual paper or coin money is not actually physically transferred from your bank to the bank and merchant’s account.

 History and movies are filled with true and fictional accounts of train and armored car robberies that occurred as money or the precious gold or silver that backed it were moved in and out of banks.  Today’s bank robbers are hackers who rob digital databases for account information that they use to transfer funds to their own accounts. Both fiat and crypto currencies have endured these attacks.

In a way crypto currencies are safer than fiat currencies as a robber cannot rob digital wallets at gunpoint because physically there is no way to collect their loot. Armed robbers can and still do rob stores and banks and get away with currency bills and coins. Art robberies are also continue, but frankly, I cannot recall any art armed robberies.

Ironically, as art my image of a Bitcoin has value when it becomes a limited edition signed print or painting, which could be paid for online through my shopping card with a debit card,or handed to me in cash or sent  inbitcoin (or fractional amount). This image will be used in artwork that is available as perks and bonuses to reward levels in my upcoming Indiegogo campaign.

In addition to its value as art, this artwork is created following the tenets of Post Conceptual art’s UnGraven Image theory. Each and every stroke that makes up this image is a letter, a Torah font letter taken from specific Bible texts that relate to the image.

Bitcoin (Essence Portrait) by Judy Rey Wasserman

These letters also are symbols that also elegantly reference strings of elementary physics, which are the basis of the physical universe. Thus the strokes present an extra level of information that is additional to the image, adding additional and intrinsic informational value.

Bitcoin as a currency that is based on information called bits. These bits of information are binary. Likewise Torah font Hebrew is a binary font – the only alpha numeric binary font in any language. Thus each letter can be written using combinations of two letters, a yud and a vav, and also it is binary as each letter can be written by simply making one or two strokes. Thus, as strokes for any crypto currency, using the Torah font closely relates to digitized information.

Bitcoin as the most popular and prominent crypto currency is making strides forward, and then backwards, and then forward again to find acceptance and legitimacy with federal, state and foreign governments. Its proponents say that it will help the unbanked, which means poor people, both in industrialized and emerging nations. Of course helping the poor, fair weights and measures and equal opportunities are all found in the Bible, in the Torah(Pentateuch) and those ideas as principles and laws originated there, out in the Sinai desert as the Israelites fled Egypt, and have been carried forward by Jews and then Christians ever since.  Fiat currencies also have an inherent equality without regard to persons insofar as a dollar held by a poor person is worth as much as one held by someone wealth, but this is generally true for most valuable items and commodities, as well as all crypto currencies.

I have also noted that Bitcoin is making its best strides forward primarily in countries where the Bible is welcomed or at least legal to own and discuss openly.  This toleration includes countries that are not thought of as having either many Jews or
Christians, like Japan. It may just be a coincidence, but it is interesting to note.

However, as fine art my images of bitcoins (much more to be revealed over time and in the Indiegogo campaign) can legally physically go and be sold in countries that do not accept Bitcoin as of this writing such as Russia, or are difficult places to own a Bible because art easily crosses borders and barriers.

Close up of strokes of Judy Rey Wasserman's Bitcoin Essence Portrait\

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. ungravenimage.com.
Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

 

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15th Oct 2014

Money Project $10 Bill as Crowdfunding Perk

Here is a newly completed finished $10 USA bill (#Bible ‘s Exodus 20 – the Ten Commandment’s original letters are the basic strokes and Leviticus 19 are the portrait’s strokes) for my Art as Money project, which is a part of my In God We Trust series. It is an original digital print, or tradigital print as various hand-drawn parts are combined to make the image, plus, some work was completed only on line, using mouse or keyboard. & also perk in an upcoming crowdfunding Indiegogo campaign. I want to show money as currency in a new, less profane way. Hopefully as an inspiration for how we use it. Money can be a blessing or a curse. Which is it for you? What do you think?
USA &10 bill created with strokes from Bible's Exodus 20 (Ten Commandments) and Leviticus 19 by Judy Rey Wasserman

USA $10  Bill Series CF 2014 by Judy Rey Wasserman

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. ungravenimage.com.
Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

 

 

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Tolerance, Freedom & Peace Comments 1 Comment »

08th Oct 2014

Art as Value, Wealth and Money Project

A new soon to launch art project will explore the creation, understanding and use of wealth through rendering money and objects that are exchanged as wealth, but have no intrinsic value themselves. For instance,  a bag of rice can be exchanged for an amount of wealth, it has an intrinsic value, but the currency paper bills issued by governments, even if they were backed by gold or silver, have no intrinsic worth, they are only small printed pieces of paper that are issued in high amounts.

The art project will include unique fine art images that comprise a subset of my series entitles, In God We Trust. Like all of my UnGraven Image artworks, the images are created using strokes that are the original letters (Torah font) from specifically selected Bible texts. The texts are selected to have relevance to or for the final image.

The project explores what we value, specifically, what the viewer may value, and how we recognize and revere value.

Value and worth in art, life, and world currencies is ever changing. Like the weather, value moves like autumn leaves blown up, down and away by the wind. And, like leaves on deciduous trees, value moves through
seasons that are both intrinsic (personal) and extrinsic (societal).  An example of an intrinsic value change can be seen in the relationship a tot has to a treasured toy or object, like a stuffed animal or toy. The item is often carried everywhere and it must be in the child’s bed at night. Yet by the time the child becomes a teenager that previously treasured item has been discarded. Some items almost always have universal intrinsic value, like water and food protein sources.

We are all aware of occurrences of extrinsic value shifts. For instance, when the cost for consumer goods like food or heating oil rise, or when we approach a seasonal communal holiday when we purchase special foods,
decorations and, perhaps even gifts.

Most people, worldwide, think about their wealth (money, or valuables that can be exchanged for goods and services) frequently, more than on a once a day basis. All kinds of thinking and emotions may be involved in relation to money, from excitement and happiness to worry, fear and even grief at loss. We even fuss over money that we do not have, meaning our lack of funding and perceived ability to purchase a desired outcome.

Yet, how aware are we of the actual money we have or seek to own and use? Do you recognize the image below? If so can you specifically indicate exactly where you have seen it? Where is it located? Do you own a similar image yourself?

Federal ReserveSymbol

Look at the image below. Do you see the previous Federal Reserve image above within it?

Cleveland$100billCF2014

USD $100 Bill (Exodus 20) by Judy Rey Wasserman

This art image above of a USA $100 Federal Reserve Note was created with strokes of the original letters of Exodus 20 (Ten Commandments) plus the English letters and numerals, including Judy Rey Wasserman’s signature, which on most other works is in Hebrew in her signature-logo, but here used to emulate the placement of an government official’s signature normally placed on an USA government issued bill. The use of Exodus 20, is to inspire the viewer to use their money lawfully and according to eternal principles and truths.

This original digital image will be one of the prints used in Judy Rey Wasserman’s Upcoming Crowd Funding campaign as a perk for supporters. The campaign will actually be giving art money away to each and every
contributor!

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. ungravenimage.com.
Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

 

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11th Sep 2014

Predicting the Future of Fine Art

The future of fine art is easy to predict in broad terms.

Art’s future is predictable because it continues to repeat its history – only in new configurations that use and stimulate the science, technology, and social insights of its current times.

Yet the artists who are creating the future of art can be difficult to recognize and invest in collecting their works. It is scientifically difficult to literally see, and then recognize what is truly revolutionary and new in its own time.

Few people have the ability (brains) that allow them to be early adopters in any field. This is because we perceive (including see) see through our memories. Our brains are wired to perceive what is familiar – not new and unfamiliar. That needs to be learned.

When something radically new is presented to us it is difficult and uncomfortable for us to perceive it. Early adopters seem to enjoy this level of discomfort, their experiences with perceiving what is new have been positive (perhaps and especially as young children), so they naturally reach out for the unknown idea or item.

This kind of adoption is different from that of the majority who are eager to own the latest tech gadget that is really at best an improvement of previous gadgets that were generally accepted. Such a gadget is not actually radically new. Therefore tablets, which are just a new form of PC, caught on quickly. They are basically smaller laptops or bigger PC-based phones. The original technology that was radically new and climbed the mountain to gain acceptance was the idea of PCs and then that they could be linked through the something we now call the Internet.

In fine art this tends to make artists, even contemporary artists who are making works much like the artists of a previous generation acceptable. Contemporary artists whose works resemble Picasso type abstractions, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop Art are acceptable but appear to be new because they use new materials or have some twist. These works are not revolutionary, just new twists on what was previously revolutionary. These artists and their works are discovered by the art world “cognoscenti” and accepted into a blue-chip gallery fold. It is as if the fact that a work has sold for a high price somehow makes it radical, even revolutionary. Yet, art history shows that many works by now almost forgotten establishment artists sold for high prices in their day.

Currently once actually radical Conceptual art and artists like Lawrence Weiner are now also accepted. Now that these works are accepted, they are not actually currently radically new, but they were radical and pioneering until enough (a tipping point) of had enough encounters with them so they could readily be seen and understood.

Ironically, this ready acceptance of artists who are new with a slight twist but not really revolutionary is also predictable and a part of art’s history.

In fine art the past exists to give us shoulders to stand on so we can see and direct a path to the future. Art (I mean great art) is ALWAYS revolutionary, which implies a lack of nostalgia — just ask Gauguin and probably the other artists who overturned the established norm of their time.

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. ungravenimage.com.
Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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10th Jul 2014

Is Art for Everyone Now?

In a way, art has always been for everyone, from the cave paintings until today. It is often shown in public spaces so that everyone in the community can view it.

Yet there continues to be a sense that art is not really for everyone as only wealthy and powerful individuals or companies, or government or religious institutions can afford to collect the best known and revered art. There is a question and ongoing debate that asks: If art is for everyone, shouldn’t everyone be able to own art?

People from all classes feel that they own music, literature and films. Certainly the music and film and video industries have and are experiencing upheaval in how they are distributed so that more people can see and “own” digital reproductions of works. The publishing industry is currently also experiencing an upheaval as e books and readers grow in popularity, and authors self-publish, by-passing the publishing paradigm of the past century.

Fine art, especially two dimensional original works on paper or canvas and three dimensional sculpture is experiencing some change of method (like 3-D printing) and materials (like original digital prints). Art fairs may be somewhat changing sales and distribution, but generally the same galleries represent the artists only they set up small temporary galleries at the fairs. The paradigm for collecting art has not radically changed the way it has for buying books and obtaining soundtracks or videos.

That people other than a religious institution, the very wealthy or the government can own art is a modern idea. The idea is spreading thanks to the events of the Twentieth Century that show middle class people finding and buying art from artists who later become blue chip artists, making these early collectors wealthy.

In reality, keeping an artwork, like a painting in a good environment for its preservation, insuring it, correct framing, etc., is costly, but not out of reach for the solidly middle class. One well known middle class collector couple was Herb and Dorothy Vogel. The Vogels had little space in their one bedroom apartment as so much was relegated to the storage of their art collection. The Vogels had no children and lived frugally on only one of their salaries so that they could afford to collect art. Yet, they were not serious investors. They were serious art collectors who collected only works that they appreciated. They enjoyed meeting artists, going to their studios and discovering emerging art. Plus, at the time that they were collecting, prior to the Internet, they had an advantage: the Vogels lived in NYC. Eventually they gave their collection away, primarily to the National Gallery of Art, in Washington, D.C.

As collectors the Vogels were an exception. Although the Impressionists turned their attention to the middle classes, and even the peasants, original art was and is predominantly collected by people who are very wealthy and at a lower price point, such as for limited edition prints, by the upper middle class.

Until very recently having great (blue chip) art in one’s home meant buying so-so art reproductive prints or beautiful and expensive coffee table art books. Now anyone in the world with an Internet connection can easily access much of the greatest art in the world as most major museums and many galleries show their art on their websites and apps. Yet the art itself remains where it is and owned by others.

Digital print technology continues to improve, and is so good that original prints are referred to and sold as paintings by fine art galleries for thousands and tens of thousands of dollars. This same technology is applied to reproductions of works by well-known artists whose museum shows are blockbusters, such as Van Gogh, Picasso and Warhol. While the original is always best, new quality digital reproductions on paper or canvas have been mistaken for an original at first glance.

Historically, the community has always owned its art to a great extent, from the cave paintings to the street art of Banksy. The “true” owners were often the religious establishments, the rulers and the very wealthy, but showing off the art has always been popular.

Our communities are expanding thanks to the Internet, which is shifting our experience of distance and time as we quickly connect with those on other continents. A growing and interconnected community of artists, curators, collectors, art writers and historians, museum directors, dealers and enthusiasts (in no special order here) are connecting through social media. The walls where we display art are no longer just in our studios, homes, offices, galleries or museums, but also on out Facebook walls, in our Twitter streams, pinned on Pinterest, shared on Instagram and on blogs like this one.

This means that someone who lives far from the cities that attract artists, especially emerging artists, can discover the potentially next blue chip artists through social media, by reading posts, tweets and blogs and looking at the jpgs of their art that they post. A visit to an artist’s Facebook wall can be a bit like visiting with an artist in her studio and often there is a link to the artist’s blog where more images and ideas are posted.

If the Internet and social media had existed for Vincent van Gogh or Monet, given his literary letter writing skills he probably would have had a blog, definitely joined the art discussions on Facebook, and images of his work would have reached a wide audience in his lifetime. Would an Internet version of the Vogels who were looking to collect emerging artists have discovered him? So far this kind of discovery of a new artist who becomes recognized as a blue chip artist has not occurred, but it will happen.

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Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) by Judy Rey Wasserman, Strokes: Original letters of the words of Psalm 113

The future looks exciting as technologies continue to develop that will inevitably disrupt the making and distribution of art in ways that before the Internet we never could have imagined.

This article began as a comment to a Facebook wall post: “Carter Cleveland Says Art in the Future Will Be for Everyone -The Artsy Founder Writes That the Internet Holds the Promise of a World Where Art Is as Ubiquitous as Music Is Today” (WSJ) http://online.wsj.com/articles/carter-cleveland-says-art-in-the-future-will-be-for-everyone-1404762157

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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13th Jun 2014

What is an Original Art Print in the Digital Age?

In today’s world of reproductions and digital works the difference between an original print and a reproductive fine art print can be difficult to differentiate. An original art print is a unique print that does not exist separately as another piece of art. Generally any artwork that is a print is a one of a multiple of the same artwork that is published as an edition.

Prior to photography and then fine art digital printing original prints by master artists were easy to distinguish.  The only possible confusion for an untrained eye could be difficult to differentiate a drawing made with ink from a black and white traditional print. However, if one looks closely, comparing an ink drawing to a traditional print by the same artist, the difference can be seen due to the variety and fluidity of line that an artist’s ink pen allows.

Photographs are all originals. Even a photograph of the ceiling taken by a child is an original. That something is an original and does not exist elsewhere does not make it art worth collecting, except possibly to the friends and relatives of the artist or child. Paradoxically, the rule of thumb is that an original artwork by an artist is more valuable than a reproductive print of the same size by the same artist.

Photographs are also considered to be prints as previously to the digital camera they were created from negatives. Creating a photograph from a negative is a printmaking process, just as creating an image from a plate, woodcut, or stone is a printmaking process.

Exodus 20 (Ten Commandments) George Washington by Judy Rey Wasserman

Ten Commandments – George Washington by Judy Rey Wasserman is a contemporary example of a black and white hand drawn work that when digitally printed on paper can be difficult to distinguish from the original work with the naked eye.

In the digital age photographs are often uploaded directly from digital cameras to computers. The physical negative disappears from the process. The file can be directly printed by special printers that use fine art pigment inks.

Then the uploaded photographic image may be manipulated by the artist in graphics software such as Photoshop, and even drawn upon by the artist using a mouse or computer stylus. When this is done we can understand that the computer becomes like a glove on the artist’s hand, which holds the “paintbrushes” that apply the ink through the printed onto a support such as paper or canvas.

Is such a printed original work of art considered to be a print or a “painting”?

Currently, in the art world the answer is that such a work can be considered either a print or a painting. However, if there is more than one of these works printed and distributed, then it is a print as it is part of an edition, even if that edition only has two copies.

Artists today are creating works directly on computers. Hand held pens and brushes have been replaced by their counterparts that make all kinds of strokes in graphics software.

In addition paintings and drawings can be scanned into an artist’s computer to become a part of a new work that only exists in digital format until printed. An artwork that includes an image initially hand drawn or painted and then altered significantly or combined with other images via a graphics software program is sometimes called a tradigital print.  These works are original prints as the drawing(s) or painting(s) that were initially created off the computer have been significantly altered or added to, thus creating a significantly different image than the original(s).

Such prints are not reproductive prints, as these are made to as closely as possible replicate a specific painting or drawing that was created and exits on its own outside of any computing device.

Dollar Bill, 2012, Series J by Judy Rey Wasserman (Ten Commandments)

The artwork image above is of an original print. Here you can see that the portrait of George Washington above has been digitally inserted into another work also created by the artist’s hand. Actually, in the In God We Trust Money series often other pieces of the bills are also created much larger and then scanned in to be used and digitally altered via graphics software. Since Wasserman uses original Torah font letters for each and every troke, crating a work as small as a life-size front of a USD bill would be difficult. However, by using 21st century technology her creative idea is accomplished. Even though individual pieces of this work were created outside of the print, the image as a whole does not exist except as a print. Thus this is an example of an original print and a tradigital print.

Prints can cross over to become paintings when the artist applies a significant amount of paint to them after they are printed. Andy Warhol turned many of his prints into paintings by painting under or over the silk-screened image.  This made them significantly different from each other and individually unique, even though the silk-screened image was the same on the canvases. Artists today are also painting on their digitally produced and printed works to create individual paintings.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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27th May 2014

Why Collect Fine Art Prints?

Fine art prints offer an entry point into real art collecting.

Art collecting can be rewarding financially, esthetically, socially and even spiritually.

If the work of an artist appreciates, art can be a good financial investment. Since fine art is now an international commodity, it is not at the whim of one country’s stock market or economic conditions

Collectable fine art prints should be signed, numbered and issued in specified limited edition, which can range from one to maybe over 750, but never
more than that number for any specific image. Prints can be original prints such as a  silk-screen, etching and photograph, or digital on paper or canvas.

Spring Shema Tree by Judy Rey Wasserman

Spring Shema Tree by Judy Rey Wasserman

An artist’s fine art prints should always be less expensive that their paintings of similar size, with the possible exception of monographs as they are also one-of-a-kind. This means one can afford a print of an artist’s work when the painting is out of reach. This works for both the artist and the collector. However, as the artist’s career continues to reach new heights the value of all the artist’s work increases. Andy Warhol’s prints have rewarded their collector’s with the same kinds of percentage returns on investment as his paintings.

Every artist’s paintings and prints can vary in worth over time. An image that becomes iconic, whether a painting or a print will become worth more over time than a more obscure work. For example, using Warhol’s market, his portraits of well know celebrities today, such as Liz Taylor, Marilyn Monroe or Warhol himself tend to be worth more than same sized and condition works from a similar date of someone hardly well known today.

Socially, collecting fine art can open doors to meeting new people, including artists, collectors and people interested in art. Most galleries hold openings that are good places to meet artists (artists attend each others openings frequently) and other collectors. Also, having real fine art prints on one’s wall is a good step away from mere decorations including the kinds of soulless paintings turned out by mills and sold in decorative and frame shops in malls.

Displaying a fine art print (meaning one by a good artist made with quality materials) is similar to having fine furniture, rather than the stuff that contains formaldehyde and is covered with plastic veneer. Collectors who display original art, including original prints in their homes or places of business shows financial prosperity and culture.

Finally, in the process of discovering artists and new trends one will be learning more about art and art history. Creating art, something that is useless except as itself is something uniquely human. There is something special about real artistic communication as we have the chance to see the world in a new way through another person’s eyes.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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11th Apr 2014

Spring Festivals Blessings

Happy Spring Festivals!

This is a season of miracles – a time of birth, beginnings, overcoming and freedom.

For me this year this season is also about my new e book, which is also the story of miracles, especially new visual “miracles” that come from art, the birth of a new art theory, overcoming adversity and the freedom of seeing more and drawing closer to The Divine.

This year, after Passover and Easter, I am “birthing” a new e book entitled, In the Beginning.  This special pre-Crowd Funding Beta version will be given away for FREE shortly after Easter and then throughout the duration of the campaign.  It is part of the SHMR – Bible Eyes series of books from Art of Seeing The Divine.

Right now the new book is with some readers who are proofing it and giving me feedback about the texts.  In the meantime, I am adding in more artwork and creating a cover.

In the Beginning is over 80 pages at the moment, and will top 90 when it is released. Although it can stand alone, the new e book is also a hefty taste-test, like a larger sumptuous version of Amazon’s “Look Inside” of what will be another book entitled Genesis.  The crowd funding campaign is to provide professional editing, printing, distribution and more for Genesis. Of course, in addition to books the campaign includes rewards of art, especially prints, but even including some original art, which is a first for me via the Internet.

The new e book, In the Beginning, includes the story of the creation and discovery of UnGraven Image Art theory and then SHMR-Bible Eyes vision, art, SHMR Activities (brain games for your eyes, inspiration and a chapter on Bible prophesy of the latter days that points to fulfilling events in the news, and also how this new SHMR-Bible Eyes vision seems to fulfill Bible prophesies that have gone unrecognized regarding a new vision in the end times.

During the winter holiday season my gift to you was a bookmark in anticipation of the crowd funding campaign for Genesis and the publication of In the Beginning.  [ SEE:  https://ungravenimage.com/blog/2013/12/holiday-20014-bookmark/ ] In that blog and as part of an email to the UnGraven Image newsletter subscribers, I wrote about the tetrads, which are the four blood moons that fall on the upcoming Passover on April 14, 2014, then on Sukkot 2014, and then again on the same holidays in 2015. These are very rare.  There seem to be some kind of connection to tetrads and momentous occasions around the same time periods for Jews, but also for true Christians.

The image of Lamb of Joy below is a kind of one-size-fits-all for the story of Passover and Easter. But when I see it, I think of King David, when he was just a shepherd boy stuck out on the backside of the desert. Maybe that is due to my personal feeling of being stuck out in a “desert” as I wrestled to turn inspiration, information, revelation and art  into a cohesive, entertaining (and at times funny), inspirational and informative book. Of course, this winter’s abundance of snow, cold and generally horrible weather meant that like many other people, I was basically not going anywhere much and this helped keep me focused on my writing task. But now that it is spring, it is time to overcome giants, march out of enslavement, overcome what seems impossible, and move into the birth of a new vision of blessing. I invite you to join me on this blessed adventure.

Lamb by Judy Rey Wasserman using letters from Bible texts for strokes

Lamb of Joy (Jeremiah 13:1-8, Isaiah 53:6-7) by Judy Rey Wasserman

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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