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15th Mar 2013

Peggy Guggenheim — Woman of Valor Portrait

As an heiress and member of the Guggenheim family, Peggy Guggenheim ((August 26, 1898 – December 23, 1979 ) was a socialite with many also famous friends, many of whom were artists and writers.

Selecting the text(s) that I will use to create a portrait can take as long, or almost as long as creating the basic black and white Essence Portrait. I do a lot of research on every subject, including interviews when possible. Then, based on that information, based on those understandings,  I do more research using a Concordance, looking up keywords and researching texts. Every now and then I just “know” what text to use, because I am somewhat familiar with the Bible and it seems obvious.

The choice of text for my new Essence Portrait of  Peggy Guggenheim was immediately clear and obvious to me: Proverbs 31, also known as Woman of Valor.

Peggy Guggenheim is known for being a great art collector and generous public benefactor. However, as an artist, I appreciate her as having been more than a great collector, she was a woman who discovered and championed great artists. I has been said that we might not have had Abstract Expressionism without her support for the artists. This makes her more than a collector, she was an important patron and benefactor of artists.

Peggy Guggenheim by Judy Rey Wasserman - strokes are Proverbs 31

Peggy Guggenheim – Proverbs 31 by Judy Rey Wasserman

A great deal has been written about Peggy Guggenheim, and even by her in her autobiography, about her life, her adventures as an art collector and gallery owner, her relationships with artists and writers, and her many marriages and loves.

As a young woman, on a self-selected art tour to see more art, she journeyed from her native New York City Western Europe, where she met just about every influential artist at that time, including Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Mondrian, Leger, Henry Moore, Hans Arp, Brancusi, Alexander Calder and Anton Pevsner, Jean Cocteau, and Max Ernst, who she was married to for a couple of years.

Her interest in collecting art and friendships led her to open a gallery in London where she could show the works of her friends. She gave Wassily Kandinsky his first-ever London show, and followed that with  an exhibition of contemporary sculpture featuring works of Henry Moore, Hans Arp, Brancusi, Alexander Calder and Anton Pevsner.

After Hitler invaded Paris, she abandoned her idea of opening a museum in London dedicated to a collection of works by Modern Art, and returned to New York City.

In October 1942, her museum-gallery, Art of This Century, opened in Manhattan, exhibiting all her Cubist, Abstract and Surrealist acquisitions. She showed the works of leading European artists (many mentioned above) in her gallery, but also met and showed the works of the new, and unknown, American Abstract Expressionists, including Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko, Janet Sobel, and Clyford. Most importantly she is credited with discovering (she had a good eye!), arranging for the first show (s) and also championing the work of Jackson Pollack.

Peggy Guggenheim by Judy Rey Wasserman - strokes are Proverbs 31

Close up of portion of Peggy Guggenheim – Proverbs 31 by Judy Rey Wasserman

(Can you spot some of the Torah font Hebrew letters used? Apart from the clear and obvious ones, you can spot some of the letters that are used as strokes, especially heys, vavs and yuds, which are often used near eyes of my subjects.)

Despite Peggy Guggenheim’s two brief, but very influential stints as an art dealer, her galleries really existed to showcase the art she loved, and had purchased, rather than as business venture aimed at making money. After the war, she returned to Europe in 1948 when her collection was exhibited at the Venice Biennale, introducing Pollock, Rothko and Arshile Gorky to Europe, alongside her works of previous Modern movements and artists, such as the Cubists and Surrealists.

Her collection continued to grow. It toured  across Europe, and was shown in Florence, Milan, Amsterdam, Brussels and Zurich.

By 1951 she had purchased and resided in the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni on the Grand Canal., where he collection then resided. She began a tradition of opening her collection and home to the general public every summer.  She left her collection and the palace to the Solomon Guggenheim Foundation. It is one of the must go-to art destinations in Venice, and the world.

A great deal has been written about Peggy Guggenheim, and even by her in her autobiography, about her life, her adventures as an art collector and gallery owner, her relationships with artists and writers, and her many marriages and loves. Reading about her life is an interesting way to discover more about the history of Modern Art.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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08th Mar 2013

Theo van Gogh – Essence Portrait

Dealers become famous and then remembered in art history primarily for the artists that they discovered and represented long before they became well known or recognized as important artists. Discovering or strongly championing an unknown but one day destined to become and remain a blue-chip artist is a dealer’s ticket, basically the only ticket, to art history immortality.

That kind of truly risky and often somewhat expensive championing of an artist is and was rare. Of course, artists that offer a new way of painting or producing art who will change art history, are also rare. It takes a dealer with vision and courage to support the work of such an artist\; to buy their works (when they are not selling), advance money to an unrecognized artist, and continue to both cheer the artist on while promoting works while the establishment continues to ignore them as they are ahead of their time. It can be quite a gamble.

The majority of these far-sighted and intrepid dealers went out to the studios, cafes and bars where they met or learned about the artists they are known for discovering. Except for one of the most famous of all dealers.

Art dealer Theo van Gogh is not famous for the many artists whose works he successfully sold, most of whom were well known and collected. He discovered his one day to be a blue chip artist and one of the greatest artists of all time, artist while he was still in his crib, because Theo is the younger brother of Vincent van Gogh, and artist he championed but whose works he failed to sell in either of their lifetimes.
Theo van Gogh by Judy Rey Wasserman uses tests of Psalms 101, 123 and 133 for the strokes

Theo van Gogh (Psalms 101, 123, and 133) by Judy Rey Wasserman

Both Vincent and Theo worked for their uncle in a family owned business of art selling that had offices in both The Netherlands and Great Briton. This is how Vincent came to be in London, where he was also exposed to the great works of the English artists (obviously he was previously familiar with Ditch art, and their influence is clearly seen in the colors of his earliest works). Vincent moved on to seemingly fail at other things until he decided to be an artist.

Theo moved to Paris, where he continued to work as an art dealer and met many of the artists we now know as the Impressionists, plus, those that became the Pointillists and Gauguin. By this time Vincent had begun to take up art, and Theo invited his to Paris, to meet the artists there. Thus begins the time when more and more Theo helps to unfailingly
support Vincent’s art goals, both emotionally and financially.

It is said that Vincent van Gogh never sold a painting, but in actuality, his dealer and brother Theo bought his works in order to support him. However, Theo, who was successfully selling the works of far less avant garde artists, could not sell Vincents works.

Theo died of illness about six moths after Vincent succumbed to a gunshot wound, that new evidence indicates may not have been self inflicted. They are buried side-by-side in Auvers-sur-Oise, France.

Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, Theo’s widow, continued Theo’s efforts. She edited and produced volumes of the brothers’ letters, and also promoted Vincent’s work and reputation through her donations of his work to various early retrospective exhibitions.and worked with artist friends of Vincent van Gogh’s to ultimately gain recognition for his art.

The strokes used to create this new Essence portrait of Theo van Gogh are the original letters from Psalms 101, 123, and 133. Psalm 133, also known as Hiney ma tov, was used about twice as much as the other two. Psalm 133is the psalm of friendship and brotherhood and references the relationship of Moses and Aaron. Since their father was a reverend it had to be well known to both Vincent and Theo. It says, “Behold, how good it is for brethren to dwell together in unity”

Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) by Judy Rey Wasserman

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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09th Jan 2013

Does the Art Market Have More Than One Bubble?

The “art market” is like champagne; it is exciting, has bubbles and can make some people a bit giddy. Some of these champagne art bubbles can, and will, burst. That is the history of the art market, and as its history repeats itself, its future. We saw this happen when the French Academy favored the art stars of its day, refusing to allow in the group dubbed: Impressionists.  The ascending bubbles of many of the established Academy artists burst over time and their works sell today for far less than those of the then new and radical Impressionists who struggled to earn a living.

Currently in print and online an ever growing swarm of articles posit that the works the Modern and Contemporary artists whose works have reached the highest auction prices point the likelihood that the Art Market is a bubble that is about to burst.  Seems to me that the lessons of Western Art history are being avoided as carefully as the obvious pun on the reality that bubbles also “pop”, since the artists most maligned are actually Pop artists or related to Pop Art.  The artists most mentioned and in the cross-hairs of the controversy stirring art business writers are: Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst.

Andy Warhol Double Denied by Judy Rey Wasserman

Psalm 19 (Andy Warhol) Double Un-Denied by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Psalm 19

The history of the art market is damp with the many burst bubbles of various individual artists, as their contributions to the ongoing thrust of art history were reevaluated.  However, the entirety of the Art Market never burst, just the market for specific individual artists. The opposite is also true as the works of other, previously less well known artist became more revered and their prices increased. A good example of this would be the Barbizon artists who are credited with influencing the Impressionists and Post Impressionists.

Since the Renaissance successfully investing in art has always been elegantly simple and often quite financially accessible for the middle class as well as the very wealthy. All one needs to do is discover the next artist who will change the history of art and invest in him (or her) before they are finally discovered by the very rich, so their prices went up.

The history of Modern Art is full of true stories of now iconic ultra blue-chip artists were at first rejected because their work was too radical and different from what was popular until they came along.  Sensational or weird is often mistaken for radical — which means a new way of making or conceiving art – a different focus.

Monet, van Gogh, Kandinsky, Picasso, Pollack and Warhol are all artists who pioneered new and radical art, and ways of making art, in their own times.  Look back through the history of art and it can easily be seen that great artists are trailblazers, a risk takers, who contributed more than just a unique style that could later be built upon by another radical, trailblazing, risk taking artist.

There are many artists who are painting Impressionist works today. Some are fantastic – but they are not radical, not reformers, they are only elegantly plowing a previously well plowed field and the best make a good living. So, we do not revere their work. No risk.

Etched into art history are names of art dealers, such as Paul Durand-Ruel Ambroise Vollard, Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, Peggy Guggenheim, Irving Blum, and Leo Castelli, because they originally championed the works of artists mentioned previously – they risked.

Leo Castelli Deuteronomy 6 portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

Deuteronomy 6 (Leo Castelli) by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Deuteronomy 6

In a recent letter to the editor of the New York Times, entitled “Invitation to a Dialogue: An Art Market Bubble?” William Cole juxtaposed the 1971 the Metropolitan Museum of Art acquisition of Velázquez’s “Portrait of Juan de Pareja” for $5.5 million ($31.4 million in 2012 dollars), then the highest price ever paid for a work of art with the considerably higher prices (even when adjusted for inflation) reached at auction for the top selling Modern and Contemporary artists.

Museum curators know that some works are difficult to hang as they will “steal” the scene from the other works in the room.  Yet, as an artist, I can easily mention or imagine hanging an equally good work by Monet, van Gogh, Cezanne, Kandinsky, Picasso, Pollack and Warhol near Velázquez’s “Portrait of Juan de Pareja”, without anyone outrageously stealing the show.

 van Gogh Psalm 113 portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

Psalm 113 (Vincent van Gogh)  by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Psalm 113

Further, the behavior of collectors in 1971 in relation to a pre-modern masterwork does not reflect what such a work could sell for at auction today. There are exceedingly few masterworks by great artists that predate modern art that are available at auction. What might be relevant to the discussion is the recently rediscovered and authenticated Da Vinci “Salvator Mundi,” a 2-foot-high (0.6 meter) panel painting Christ, once owned by King Charles I, valued by dealers at a record $200 million.

Da Vinci, and almost all once radical, blue-chip scene stealing artists have one other thing in common. They have all inspired other later artists who in turn were radical, scene stealing and became or will become blue-chip artists. Both Koons and Hirst are influenced by Warhol. The question remains: what new, truly radical artist will be influenced by their works, if any? It is perhaps a bit soon to answer such a question.

The exhibit at the Metropolitan shows some of the many artists who have been influenced by Andy Warhol, and more artists, such as myself (armed with a manifesto) are now waiting in the wings.  As Eric Shiner, Director of The Andy Warhol Museum, noted in his letter-reply to the editor of the New York Times, “Warhol changed the visual vocabulary of the United States, and by extension the world, through his radical departure from preconceived notions of what art is, how it functions, and, yes, ultimately how it is sold, traded and collected.”

Recessions, depressions, inflations, or boon times can change the monetary worth of an individual masterpiece, since the value of the currency itself changes. Does the essential value of the Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Michelangelo’s David or Rembrandt’s The Night Watch really change based on the economy or currency valuation? Of course not.

While investors at auctions can make straws out of paper money to inflate or prop up the failing market for an artist who is clever but never truly art-radical, eventually whatever is only given shape by air (or gas) will burst or dissipate. Secondary galleries are littered with the works of artists from the nineteenth and early twentieth century who were well known in their time, but were not at the forefront of the movement they followed and never inspired the work of an artist that became blue chip. Quietly, one by one, those little bubbles burst as the prices for those artworks, when inflation is factored in, devalue in price.

The whole of the art market will not suffer, or decrease in value, because historically that is not what occurs. The market for individual artists burst. Sometimes, seemingly all at once due to financial conditions in the society, or because the new radical artists come along, the artists who only have style begin to seem less important or valuable.

Art history continues to be written by artists with radical new ideas, but the art market continues to be a version of history repeating itself.

Your comments are welcomed below.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art Comments No Comments »

03rd Jul 2012

Two Dollars Sky Sunset Aleph

In the new painting, Two Dollars Sky Sunset Aleph, the viewer is challenged and inspired to see money in a new way. How we see and use our resources — money, reveals our values and beliefs, including those we hold unconsciously. Seeing fine art and recognizing our responses to it, plus the new visual information we partake can enrich our lives.

In my studio I use hand created (painted or drawn images, which are then scanned into the computer and altered and combined with other images and then printed out on fine art paper of canvas and painted on to create a work

For instance, the dollar bill is created by combining two separate images, the Exodus 20 (Ten Commandments) basic Essence Portrait of George Washington with the “frame” of a USA dollar bill, which is also created with Exodus 20.

Ten Commandments – George Washington by Judy Rey Wasserman

I use a professional flatbed scanner to capture the original images, which at present limits them to no more than legal size per image. Scanning is preferable to photographing as it offers greater dpi and accuracy.

The first artist I saw take his original printed image and them paint on it to create new, unique works was Andy Warhol. Although his works of this type were silkscreens, he did explore video and computer art; which were cutting edge new at the end of his life. A major difference is that Warhol’s screen-printed images come from altered photographs and my prints are totally drawn or painted.

Clearly there is an artistic link in that Warhol created works featuring dollar bills. Personally I love the irony in that his 200 One Dollar Bills Sold at Sotheby’s for $385,000 in 1986 and was again sold by them 23 years later for $23,000,000, which is quite a profit on an image of $200.

However, it was a 2007 show at 1018 Art of “Preis Bilder” series works by Martin Kippenberger that eventually inspired my new and ongoing exploration of money art and worth in a series entitles, In God We Trust. According to Roberta Smith’s New York Times review of this show,: “Preis Bilder”… title exploits the double German meaning of “preis”: “price paintings” or “prize paintings.”

In the brand new tradigital painting, Two Dollars Sky Sunset Aleph the digital black and white digital images of two of my dollar bill artworks are painted over with a sunset created with watercolor pencils and inks. Thus the image featured on this blog is not a digital painting, but a photo of a real new of a kind painting. It began as two black and white images that were hand drawn and painted, the portrait and the one dollar bill without the portrait, both images created with strokes that are the letters of Exodus 20. Then that digital image was added to a copy of itself, one on top and one on the bottom, and printed out with only black ink on an professional digital art printer on archival white art paper. Then on that original digital print, painted a sunset with strokes from Genesis 1-2:7, using watercolor pencils and archival art colored inks.

Two Dollars Sky Sunset Aleph by Judy Rey Wasserman

It combines two series, the above mentioned In God We Trust, with my first and ever on-going Genesis Sunset series.

In the Bible, a sunset is always abeginning, a moment of inspiration, harkening a new day or experience.

Thus, Two Dollars Sky Sunset Aleph is painting about how two dollars can be used to inspire or set life off in a new direction.  Two dollars can buy many things.  It can but a new high quality watercolor pencil for an artist.  Two dollars can buy a couple of candy bars, or the more healthful choice of an apple, orange, or grapes in most markets. It can also provide food for a child for a day, maybe even more than a day, thanks to charities helping people struggling with droughts, wars and political oppression in third world countries.

That this work is painted with the strokes from Bible texts, especially the Ten Commandments, also indicates that it deals with value, worth and honesty. Even a couple of bucks can be significant depending on how they are used. How can you use two dollars to inspire and benefit yourself and others?

In Hebrew, the word “aleph” is the name of the fist letter of the alphabet. Alpeh can also be used as the number “one”, as Hebrew is an alpha-numeric language. Aleph is used in the title of this painting as I intend to create additional original Genesis Sunset works based on the two dollar theme.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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23rd May 2012

Beth Rudin DeWoody’s Art of 1945-1980 Los Angeles in 2012 Southampton

Thanks to Southampton ‘s Parrish Art Museum and the generosity of collector Beth Rudin DeWoody, Hamptonites and vacationers can go back in time to see the 1945-1980 Los Angeles artists, via the EST-3 exhibition, which is a part of DeWoody’s private collection. The exhibit runs through June 17, 2012 .

It is a knock-out of a show, that includes good works, and some not- to-be-missed works by Eleanor Antin, John Baldessari, Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Vija Celmins, Guy de Cointet, Robert Colescott, Bruce Conner, Jack Goldstein, Robert Graham, David Hockney, Dennis Hopper, Douglas Huebler, Mike Kelley, Ed Kienholz, John McCracken. John MacLaughlin, Matt Mullican, Ken Price, and Ed Ruscha.

The show is divided by curator David Pagel into three sections: People, Places and Things, which provide a framework for the diversity of work.

Frederick Hammersley’s Same difference, 1959

A few of the treasures of the show that I now hold in my memory and hope you will see for yourself are from People: a Dennis Hopper gelatin silver print of Andy Warhol, Henry Gelzahler, David Hockney and Jeff Goodman; and a wall of portrait drawings by Don Bachardy; from Places: Several Hockneys, including Bank, Palm Springs 1968 (colored pencil on paper), Mike Kelly’s hanging silk-screened banners on silk, and Eleanor Antin’s photo, and Ed Ruscha’s serigraphs from the Insects Portfolio; from Things: Vija Celmins’ Plastic Puzzle Piece 1966, which is a fur lined box containing 9 puzzle shaped Plexiglas pieces.

Beth Rudin DeWoody’s interest in California artists was spurred by the collection of her mother and step-father, plus her own visits to the area, beginning as a college student. She is now noted as one of the world’s foremost collectors of Modern and Contemporary art, plus she has also curated well reviewed gallery shows

.

Billy Al Bengston’s Untitled (dento)

“I believe in collecting both historical and contemporary art, “DeWoody has said. “It is really important to collect younger artists to keep them going, but I have also collected artists who were undervalued or underrated during their time, who were fabulous artists but may not have gotten the recognition they deserved.”

Matt Mullican’s Untitled (Mullican Poster)

At the Parrish Art Museum ‘s web site ( http://parrishart.org/ ) you will find further information plus a video interview by Parrish Art Museum ‘s Director Terri Sultan with Beth Rudin DeWoody in her New York City apartment ( http://parrishart.org/current.asp?id=430 ).

To see a previous blog review about exhibits curated by Beth Rudin DeWoody Click: The Collector as Curator

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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09th Sep 2011

Basic Sunflower Portrait

Basic Sunflower Portrait is another artwork in my continuing investigation of black )on white background) vs. color  strokes to create portraits of people, places, flora, fauna and things (like USA currency bills).

I have been told since I first entered the High School of Music and Art that color is one of my strong suits. Making images without color is like being on a severe diet or fast, it almost physically hurt when I began with the first Essence Portrait, which was of Andy Warhol several years ago.

Even when I have studied art or made sketches I always envision the color I will be adding eventually. Now with the Basic Essence Portraits and images (you can see this as a portrait of a sunflower, I am concentrating of creating works in black and white that can stand on their own, without color, but to which color can be added.

As a school girl, before I began any formal art education, I hung out a lot in the great museums and galleries of NYC, where I “discovered” van Gogh and Rouault, both who often outline their forms in a dark color. Later Warhol’s silk-screens, with their strong black images and colored paints added their influence.

My Essence Portrait works take a next step as while my black strokes are also used to physically define the form(s) of the image they are the very importance of it due to their symbols, which are always the original Torah font letters of a Bible text. For me, the strokes are always paramount. Strokes are the intrinsic and essential reality of any painting, and that emulates the reality that pre-particles or energy is the intrinsic and essential reality of our physical universe.

Watch for a new version — in color — of this image coming soon to this blog.

Basic Sunflower Portrait (Proverbs 31:10-31 – A Woman of Valor)

By Judy Rey Wasserman

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Bible Art, Bible Coloring for Adults Comments No Comments »

09th Feb 2011

VIP Art Fair – Changing the Future of Art Collecting

The 2011 VIP Art Fair was the first major art fair to be held on the web. It will be remembered in the history of art as the first time that highly valued primary market Contemporary Art was openly sold via the Internet by internationally renowned art galleries.

Art Sales via the Internet

Of course, artists are selling art via their websites and community sites like Etsy and 20 x 200.  Secondary dealers have used eBay for many years, and then other auction sites, like artnet.com, plus their own gallery web sites to successfully sell art.

Major primary galleries, including probably all that participated in the VIP Art Fair, have used the Internet to show art and attract collectors via their individual websites.  Most galleries also send JPEGs via emails to prospective collectors; but this takes place in private, whereas the sales from the fair were generally reported in the press.

Breaking Barriers

The VIP Art Fair also broke barriers of time and distance opening the visual information of viewing a major Contemporary Art Fair to anyone, in any country who had access to the Internet. The real and best success of this fair may be truly known ten or twenty years from now when young people who attended the fair, which was free, who would normally not be able to attend such a fair otherwise, become artists, collectors, curators, enthusiasts, etc., thanks to this strong encounter with the Contemporary Art world.

Viewing the VIP Art Fair’s booths and art, plus readily available information (sometimes better in relation to an artist than what the gallery normally includes on its website) was also a boon for current collectors, artists, curators, critics, educators and students, etc.  Plus, again the fair was free and could be viewed by anyone with an internet connection, even while in the warm cozy comfort of home.

According to Jane Cohan, who along with her husband James is the founder of the VIP Art fair, “The galleries showed leadership and courage in joining VIP Art Fair to launch a new global paradigm for art conversation, exposure and commerce.”

Art Viewing

VIP stands for Viewing in Private, a concept that grew out of the James Cohan Gallery ‘s “private viewing gallery”, where the gallery shows specific work to specific clients, streams video and even curates small online shows to clients who are sent a special access code.

While nothing is better that seeing an artwork up close and personal, the VIP fair allowed galleries to show different views of a work. This is especially helpful for sculptures and for 2 D works that include fine details like strokes or collaged items. In addition, the fair featured pan-gallery capability, Artist Pages with biographies, pictures and videos. This is more information than can easily be found about an artist and their work at a gallery show, and is certainly more conveniently perused from one’s own Internet connection than from printouts read sitting on a gallery’s bench.

Participation & Sales

Predominantly the fair was populated by booths of distinguished galleries, many of whom will also be showing at Art Basel 2001,  such as: Ruth Benzacar Galería de Arte, Cheim & Read, Gagosian, Hauser & Wirth, Xavier Hufkens, Luhring Augustine, Timothy Taylor, Marlborough, Pace, White Cube, and David Zwirner.  The presence of such galleries drew collectors and future collectors who were directed to contact the galleries via phones manned for the occasion

Several media sources have reported on the special attendance garnered by the booths selling works by emerging artists. Savvy collectors are always looking to discover the next art stars before they make big, which can be as lucrative as having a super winning lottery ticket. I hope this aspect of the fair continues and becomes widely recognized as it will help lure more collectors, galleries and emerging artists who otherwise have to schlep over to satellite fairs away from major brick and mortar fairs in Basel, Miami, NYC, London, etc.

Top tier galleries such as: James Cohan Gallery sold a Beatriz Milhazes for more than $200,000, Sadie Coles HQ sold an Angus Fairhurst bronze sculpture for between $241,000 and $321,000, David Zwirner Gallery sold Chris Ofili’s “Mary Magdalene (Infinity)” for $375,000. Rudolf Stingel’s 2002 work, “Die Birne,” priced between $500,000 and $1 million by the London dealer Sadie Coles HQ, was the most expensive of the confirmed sales

Impact

This helps every artist who sells their work, both original and reproductive, or takes commissions over their websites or through art websites that features fine art. When a collector hesitates to buy art over the Internet rather than from a studio visit (usually not practical due to distance) or through a brick and mortar gallery, the strength of the online VIP sales mentioned above can be pointed out.

Despite early technical glitches, which did and can befall interactive sites like Facebook, Twitter and even Amazon in its beginning, the VIP Art Fair attendance was strong. It was common for dealers to see over a thousand hits per image. When art or an artist is well viewed it usually results in future sales, as there is a clear correlation between the amount of recognition (fame) an Contemporary artist enjoys and sales, including price. This is why some artists who are never well reviewed (if ever reviewed by major critics) make fortunes and are even included in ArtReview’s 100. Once again this is good for all the artists represented at the fair, plus artists who have websites and exposure as collecting online becomes accepted by collectors.

So, was the VIP Art Fair a success?

Ed Winkleman, who is the owner of the fair participant Winkleman Gallery, blogged “I took a straw poll among other dealers who participated this year, and the vast majority I spoke to agree with me that it’s definitely worth doing again next year….that it seems destined to become a strong supplemental part of our overall outreach efforts. No one expects it to replace real-world art fairs, but in January, when most of the Northern hemisphere is risking serious travel delays due to weather, it brought us a very nice influx of new business and potential for more.

Julia Joern, of the David Zwirner Gallery, which is also one of the founding galleries told me, “We believe in the platform and hope they work out the kinks for next year because we definitely want to continue to be a part of it.”

Jane Cohan said, “Despite some painful technical setbacks that impinged on our vision for the fair, we all have much to be proud of in having attracted 41,000 registrants from over 190 countries who collectively viewed over 7.65 million artworks over nine days. On these measures alone, our inaugural effort confirmed the value and potential of the VIP Art Fair.   Reports from our galleries of sales and new contacts prove that the fair was a catalyst for collectors and curators to engage with galleries and therefore can be considered a success by the standards of a traditional fair. We look forward to working with our galleries to expand the platform for VIP Art Fair 2.0.”

Very few, if any, ground-breakers in the history of Modern and Contemporary art were received with immediate success. Wealthy collectors tend to be conservative, not early adopters who are more likely to be risk takers, entrepreneurs and artistically avant-garde. That the VIP Art fair enjoyed the level of sales it did, is surprising, something to cheer and a harbinger of what will eventually broaden and change the way that Contemporary Art, and fine art is collected. Everyone who participated and attended the inaugural VIP Art Fair helped create a new step in both art and web history.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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03rd Dec 2010

New Open Edition Art Prints by Judy Rey Wasserman

[et_pb_section fb_built=”1″ _builder_version=”3.22″][et_pb_row _builder_version=”3.25″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″ _builder_version=”3.25″ custom_padding=”|||” custom_padding__hover=”|||”][et_pb_post_title _builder_version=”4.9.10″ _module_preset=”default”][/et_pb_post_title][et_pb_text _builder_version=”3.27.4″ background_size=”initial” background_position=”top_left” background_repeat=”repeat”]We now offer the first authorized Open Edition Prints of Judy Rey Wasserman’s Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art.

These initial Open Edition Prints were selected for their broad appeal.

Over the years, fans and collectors had requested Open Edition Prints of Judy Rey Wasserman’s Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art.

Exodus 20- The Ten Commandments (George Washington) by Judy Rey Wasserman, Essence Portrait series

To see this print enlarged, plus a close up of the strokes, and discover more click: HERE

Genesis Dalet -by Judy Rey Wasserman ,Genesis: Sunset-Sunrise series

To see this print enlarged and discover more click: HERE

Mourner’s Prayer by Judy Rey Wasserman

To see this print enlarged and discover more click: HERE

Open Edition Prints are always less expensive than an artist’s Limited Edition Prints, assuming those are limited to no more than 700 in quantity per image.

Open Edition Prints are usually not created with the same quality of inks and media and attention to detail as Limited Edition Prints — but ours are!

However, since Judy Rey Wasserman’s Post Conceptual Art, including UnGraven Image Art focuses on the stroke(s), which are the original Torah font letters of Bible texts, attention to detail is vital.

All of the artist’s Limited Edition Prints are created in the artist’s own studio, using the best and most archival inks and media available and the highest dpi (dots per inch) to ensure quality and clarity of detail. The meaning of the works is inherent in the strokes which can be seen here and there in the works in the prints produced by the artist’s UnGraven Image Publishing.

Many printers were contacted or researched, both online and via the Internet in an effort to produce open edition unsigned prints that would also have high resolution and attention to detail outside of the artist’s studio. However, to date not one was found who uses or will use the high resolution dpi as such minute focus on detail; especially during the set up process is not cost effective generally, plus the printing takes longer. Plus, in the end these prints would have been as costly or more costly to consumers, deprived Wasserman’s affiliates of commissions, and quality could not be guaranteed.

So the decision was made to offer Open Edition Prints directly through the artist’s studio to provide the same quality, attention to detail and care to all collectors and customers. These prints will be signed to show that they are from the artist’s studio and Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Publishing.

Our Open Edition Prints include the same quality of detail as the Limited Edition Prints. The current prints are also archival, using the best available inks and media. The only significant differences are that the Open Edition Prints are unlimited, and thus not considered to be a viable investment opportunity, plus a Certificate of Authenticity is not included, as the receipt and artist’s signature serve to show authenticity. Provenance is only kept on Limited Edition Prints as prints that have 700 or less are understood as investments in an artist’s work. [Note: When investing in any limited edition print the value of the print and its value as an investment depends upon who the artist is and the condition of the print itself.]

We print using the highest dpi ratio available, which means our prints have the best and finest detail reproduction. This is important because Post Conceptual and UnGraven

All of the prints issued from Judy Rey Wasserman’s Post Conceptual UnGraven Image studio include the same full money back guarantee.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Bible Art Comments No Comments »

28th Oct 2010

Taking a Break in Color

or the majority of the past year I have been working with black and white creating Basic Essence Portraits and money and other images. Working in black and white is new for me as an artist, and I find myself yearning dip a brush into colors, which for me seems like taking a vacation.

Just as Warhol used his black silkscreens, I am scanning my images into the computer where I manipulate them into variations. While the variations usually involve color, it is not the same as working in color with my hand, using a brush, pen or paintbrush. In time I will also be painting upon the prints, as Warhol did with his silkscreens, but, the work is not at that stage.

While the limits of the black and white images have helped me grow as an artist, I miss working in color. Color is one of my strong suits as an artist, which is something I was told by my teachers.

I never tire of seeing the paintings by Monet where he paints the same scene at different times of the day and the color changes due to the light. The Hamptons, where I live, is renowned for its light, which has drawn many famous artists to this place. A drive along a county road here on a sunny day  is a glorious experience, in any season, thanks to the splendid light

Although the majority of my work continues to be in the preparatory stage of black and white for now, I must and do return to color, as a kind of break or vacation, because on some level as an artist I need color.

Below is a new small work, Genesis Dalet, that will be used in a new Visual Awakening Exercise in the revised version of the e book, The Art of Seeing the Divine,  What Do You See?  Basically. the revised version add more Visual Awakening Experiences (brain games to gain Showmore Vision, also called “Bible Eyes”) to the 10 that are now included.

Genesis Dalet Sunset uses the Torah font letters of Genesis 1-2:7 for each and ever stroke, and therefore is a member of my Genesis: Sunset-Sunrise series. Among other things this series is about moments of inspiration and understandings — those AhHa moments, when we “see the light”.

In Genesis Dalet Sunset the moment of light depicted is so strong that it seems to create a dip in the land beneath it from its “weight”, looking like a heavy object placed on something soft like foam or a quilt. In reality, this effect is created as the bright light reflects and visually seems to overtake whatever immediately surrounds it.

Sometimes an inspirational idea we have can almost weight us down with its significance that we must somehow express the excitement, which can include jumping up and down, which visually echoes the sun in Genesis Dalet weighing upon the horizon.

While a painting can be understood to capture and reveal a moment in time, my symbol — strokes can be understood to represent the ideas,  memories, understandings and activities that led up to this moment of inspiration.  The eternal enigma of consciousness is that in order to fully be in and experience this moment of now consciously, we must perceive it through our memories.

Genesis Dalet by Judy Rey Wasserman
Acrylic, watercolor pencils and ink, 8.5 x 11 inches
Strokes: Genesis: 1-2:7

Genesis Dalet is available as an investment quality limited edition hand signed and numbered fine art archival print. See more images and discover more, including how you can get this artwork for yourself and your loved ones at:  https://artofseeingthedivine.com/product/genesis-dalet-sunset/

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art Comments No Comments »

02nd Sep 2010

Secrets to Profitably Investing in Fine Art on Any Budget in any Economy

Blue chip art is proven to be one of the best investments I both boon times and times of recession, as shown by the Mei Moses Fine Art Index. Plus, in modern history recessions and depressions have also proven to be fabulous opportunities for art investors to discover new, emerging artists who become the blue chip artists from that time period. The secret is to know what exactly to look for and buy.

While the economy and stock market continue to falter, blue chip galleries and auctions show increasing signs of revival and outright strength.

Yet, dealers continue to promote the idea that the best reason to buy art is because a person likes it (or love it). Most prominent dealers confirm that they advise their clients to only collect works that they love. While this works for other personal luxury purchases, such as watches, Jimmy Choo shoes and vehicles, after a certain price point, original art should always be understood as an investment.

The same dealers back up their artists in terms of their art education, previous shows, prominent collectors and past selling history to help a new collector feel secure. Over time, this security may prove false. There is a glut of many artists who have MFAs from excellent art schools who are failing to make a living at art or, more importantly innovate in any important way. And, there is also a glut of good, mid career artists, even artists whose works are in famous museums, whose works will never reach true blue chip status for the same reason.

During this recession collectors are showing that their best reason to buy art is because it is a good investment. Even the Nazi’s knew that art was an extremely valuable possession. This is why the stole so much art that they personally did not “love”, as it was the antithesis of their so-called ideals, as it was beloved or created by Jews, like Kandinsky.

Fine art has proven to be one of the very best investments ever, rivaling an early investment in Google – but like stocks, all fine art is not equally valuable for investors.

Essentially, there are two sure ways to invest well in art.

First Way to Invest Profitably in Art

The first is to invest in an important or significant work by a blue chip artist. A blue chip artist can be understood as an easily recognized name, a kind of brand, like Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Turner, Pissarro and Monet and Degas, van Gogh, Kandinsky, Rothko, Johns or Weiner, etc.

Generally, a blue chip artist influences other innovative artists—who in turn influence other artists. In the above simple and short list, spanning from Caravaggio to Jasper Johns and Lawrence Weiner you can see how one innovative artist’s works inspires another.

Jasper Johns and Lawrence Weiner are contemporary living artists, but my work guarantees that them as prime influencers and thus, blue chip artists who will remain such over coming centuries. I am founding Post Conceptual Art theory – painting with symbols as strokes, which is a radically new step in the history of art. I have taken the inspiration of their letters and numbers and used them as strokes in a traditional painterly manner. In no way am I copying them, but I am standing on their shoulders. If you can afford it, buy the best works of Johns and Weiner – learning this from the likes of me is as close as you can get to insider art trading.

There are other names, including contemporary ones, which are easily recognized that may not be true blue chip artists. It is questionable that their art will influence other artistic innovators. Some of these artists may be incredible artists who quickly followed innovators like Pissarro and Monet and Degas, and as such carved a kind of historic spot for themselves, like Childe Hassam. Yet Hassam was not the innovator, and somehow, as a young girl wandering the Metropolitan and Museum of Modern Art the Impressionists who inspired me were Pissarro and Monet and Degas. Even though I was uneducated, their authenticity of innovation shone through to me.

The innovators are artists who found new techniques and focuses for making art. They do more than simply have their own recognizable style—they have their own unique way.

Many other chains of artistic innovators leading to artistic innovators may be easily constructed. It is kind of like the game of six degrees of separation played out over the timeline of art history.

Second, Less Expensive Way to Invest Profitably in Art

The second way to make “a killing” by investing in art – is to buy the early works of an artistic innovator before they are really discovered and their prices zoom skyward. This is easy advise but historically difficult to do. It is much like recognizing a nascent Google investment opportunity.

Ironically, in Modern and Contemporary times — when dealers are the middlemen between artists and patrons — the work of an emerging artistic innovator is almost always immediately unnoticed, unappreciated and even shunned, especially by the establishment.

When the Impressionists banded together to show their works, they were not only rejected by the establishment, they were ridiculed. Nothing sold.

Andy Warhol’s first show of his now iconic Soup Cans and Brillo Boxes was a complete dud. Nothing sold. His dealer, Irving Blum, took pity on him and bought some of the paintings for a pittance. A few years later this made him a very rich man.

Oh, and van Gogh. His otherwise successful art dealer and brother, Theo, only managed to sell one of his then strange seeming paintings in his lifetime.

Jackson Pollock spent cold winters in Springs, on the Eastern End of Long Island as heat is expensive and his works were not selling.

Lawrence Weiner spent cold winters on his houseboat in the Netherlands as heat is expensive and his works were not selling, although by that time Pollock’s were highly valued..

Why do people fail to immediately see artistic innovators? Ironically the answer is in the question, the work of artistic innovators are actually more difficult to see and understand that the work of artists who have already been accepted and are well known.

To see anything we need similar memories. Ninety percent of vision happens in the brain as it decodes impressions of light received from the eyes. It is actually much easier – and we are more accurate at—perceiving art (or anything) that is more familiar to us. We have more memories of this being art. We have learned to see the older art as art.

Keep in mind that any art that sells well will “inspire” other artists to paint in a similar copy-cat way. Copy-cats are not innovators. There are many “Pop” artists today who have developed slightly different styles from Warhol, Lichtenstein. The puzzle is how to tell if something new that somehow does not seem like art, possible is harder to see or understand as art, is something radical, is actually art or just awful. The questions to ask are: 1.) is this artist painting in a new and unique way that can be copied by others? If the answer to that is yes, the next question that also must be affirmative is: Does this new way (or method, or focus) have the potential to inspire other future artistic innovators?

What the Successful Investor Needs (Besides Money)

Recognized Blue Chip

To discover and collect a work by a recognized blue chip artist you need a great education in art or the help of excellent art dealers and advisers, plus a great deal of money. When an artist-innovator mentions the artists who influenced them, if any are underpriced or valued contemporary artists buy the art of the influencer and the new innovator.

First Dollar I Ever Made by Judy Rey Wasserman

In God We Trust series 

All Strokes: Exodus 20 (Ten Commandments) in Torah Font

Plus numbers, artists signature, “series” and “Exodus 20-Ten Commandments in English.
Original Digital Print combining pen & ink paintings by the artist.

Emerging Investors and Innovators

Finding new innovative artists may also be accomplished through dealers and galleries, especially those that feature emerging artists. However, your fingers can also do the walking online, through sites like artnet.com, artprice.com, the sites the art auction houses, plus, for the really new, by watching and finding artists through social media sites like artists’ blogs, Twitter, Facebook and You Tube. New innovators, those who are currently innovating – rather than hoeing the innovative paths they previously created – are most likely found in places that are also innovative, which at present includes social media.

Investing profitably in art takes money, but not necessarily a great deal of money. Herbert Vogel, a postman, and his wife Dorothy, a librarian in the Brooklyn Public Library, managed to amass a Modern and Contemporary art collection worth a fortune that they donated to the National Gallery. What the Vogels really invested was their time.

The Vogels met and befriended artists and bought works early in the artists’ careers. The only real advantage the Vogels had was their location, they were in New York City before the Internet and then Social Media was invented.

Today work by truly innovative emerging artists can be found for under $5,000 USA , and easily for under $10,000 for good sized works. While New York City remains the center of the Art World, every innovative artist and gallery in NYC, plus most of the rest of the world, can be found on the Internet. Anyone with a PC is in the right place at the right time.

To make collecting this new work more enticing note that almost always the early works of an artist are considered to be the most valuable. For example, only now are Warhol’s later works, such as the large Last Supper paintings, nearing the value of his Soup Cans.

So while the stock market jitters, gold soars and real estate tanks check out investing in art. The images you see, the ideas you come in contact with, the artists you will meet will be much more inspiring and interesting than the average broker. Plus, you are now armed with the insider art knowledge that what you need to find are the innovators.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews Comments No Comments »