Judy Rey Wasserman, UnGraven Image, Contemporary Art theory, art manifesto, limited edition prints, religious art, Word Art, science based art, Art blog, Hebrew letter art, contemporary religious art, Bible art, Jewish art, Christian art, Genesis art, Genesis paintings, Jewish giclees, Bible prints, Christian prints, Bible art, religious art, spiritual art, bible based art, new religious art movement, contemporary religious art movement, contemporary religious art, modern Christian art, modern religious art, modern Jewish art, Hebrew letter art, art of the Hebrew letters, painting Bible words, painting Bible letters, Kabbalah art, Biblical based art, UnGraven Image home, spiritual art, Wasserman art, Graven Image, Bible based art, Bible word art, blessing art, Hebrew letter art, UnGraven Image Art, religious art, new art movement, Paintings of Judy Rey Wasserman, Art of UnGraven Image, Judy Rey Wasserman, Bible Art, Religious Art, Contemporary art, new art movement, Judeo-Christian Art, Christian Art, Jewish Art, Torah art, UnGraven Image Art, Paintings of Judy Rey Wasserman, Art of Hebrew Letters, Kabbalah Art, Sunrise Sunset images, Sunset Sunrise art, Original Paintings and giclees
UnGraven Image Home Bible Art Art and Inspiration Vision, Science and the Bible Art Collecting Books Bible Coloring for Adults Tolerance, Freedom and Peace

SHOP

Archive for the 'Art Collecting' Category

28th Oct 2010

Taking a Break in Color

or the majority of the past year I have been working with black and white creating Basic Essence Portraits and money and other images. Working in black and white is new for me as an artist, and I find myself yearning dip a brush into colors, which for me seems like taking a vacation.

Just as Warhol used his black silkscreens, I am scanning my images into the computer where I manipulate them into variations. While the variations usually involve color, it is not the same as working in color with my hand, using a brush, pen or paintbrush. In time I will also be painting upon the prints, as Warhol did with his silkscreens, but, the work is not at that stage.

While the limits of the black and white images have helped me grow as an artist, I miss working in color. Color is one of my strong suits as an artist, which is something I was told by my teachers.

I never tire of seeing the paintings by Monet where he paints the same scene at different times of the day and the color changes due to the light. The Hamptons, where I live, is renowned for its light, which has drawn many famous artists to this place. A drive along a county road here on a sunny day  is a glorious experience, in any season, thanks to the splendid light

Although the majority of my work continues to be in the preparatory stage of black and white for now, I must and do return to color, as a kind of break or vacation, because on some level as an artist I need color.

Below is a new small work, Genesis Dalet, that will be used in a new Visual Awakening Exercise in the revised version of the e book, The Art of Seeing the Divine,  What Do You See?  Basically. the revised version add more Visual Awakening Experiences (brain games to gain Showmore Vision, also called “Bible Eyes”) to the 10 that are now included.

Genesis Dalet Sunset uses the Torah font letters of Genesis 1-2:7 for each and ever stroke, and therefore is a member of my Genesis: Sunset-Sunrise series. Among other things this series is about moments of inspiration and understandings — those AhHa moments, when we “see the light”.

In Genesis Dalet Sunset the moment of light depicted is so strong that it seems to create a dip in the land beneath it from its “weight”, looking like a heavy object placed on something soft like foam or a quilt. In reality, this effect is created as the bright light reflects and visually seems to overtake whatever immediately surrounds it.

Sometimes an inspirational idea we have can almost weight us down with its significance that we must somehow express the excitement, which can include jumping up and down, which visually echoes the sun in Genesis Dalet weighing upon the horizon.

While a painting can be understood to capture and reveal a moment in time, my symbol — strokes can be understood to represent the ideas,  memories, understandings and activities that led up to this moment of inspiration.  The eternal enigma of consciousness is that in order to fully be in and experience this moment of now consciously, we must perceive it through our memories.

Genesis Dalet by Judy Rey Wasserman
Acrylic, watercolor pencils and ink, 8.5 x 11 inches
Strokes: Genesis: 1-2:7

Genesis Dalet is available as an investment quality limited edition hand signed and numbered fine art archival print. See more images and discover more, including how you can get this artwork for yourself and your loved ones at:  https://artofseeingthedivine.com/product/genesis-dalet-sunset/

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art Comments No Comments »

02nd Sep 2010

Secrets to Profitably Investing in Fine Art on Any Budget in any Economy

Blue chip art is proven to be one of the best investments I both boon times and times of recession, as shown by the Mei Moses Fine Art Index. Plus, in modern history recessions and depressions have also proven to be fabulous opportunities for art investors to discover new, emerging artists who become the blue chip artists from that time period. The secret is to know what exactly to look for and buy.

While the economy and stock market continue to falter, blue chip galleries and auctions show increasing signs of revival and outright strength.

Yet, dealers continue to promote the idea that the best reason to buy art is because a person likes it (or love it). Most prominent dealers confirm that they advise their clients to only collect works that they love. While this works for other personal luxury purchases, such as watches, Jimmy Choo shoes and vehicles, after a certain price point, original art should always be understood as an investment.

The same dealers back up their artists in terms of their art education, previous shows, prominent collectors and past selling history to help a new collector feel secure. Over time, this security may prove false. There is a glut of many artists who have MFAs from excellent art schools who are failing to make a living at art or, more importantly innovate in any important way. And, there is also a glut of good, mid career artists, even artists whose works are in famous museums, whose works will never reach true blue chip status for the same reason.

During this recession collectors are showing that their best reason to buy art is because it is a good investment. Even the Nazi’s knew that art was an extremely valuable possession. This is why the stole so much art that they personally did not “love”, as it was the antithesis of their so-called ideals, as it was beloved or created by Jews, like Kandinsky.

Fine art has proven to be one of the very best investments ever, rivaling an early investment in Google – but like stocks, all fine art is not equally valuable for investors.

Essentially, there are two sure ways to invest well in art.

First Way to Invest Profitably in Art

The first is to invest in an important or significant work by a blue chip artist. A blue chip artist can be understood as an easily recognized name, a kind of brand, like Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Turner, Pissarro and Monet and Degas, van Gogh, Kandinsky, Rothko, Johns or Weiner, etc.

Generally, a blue chip artist influences other innovative artists—who in turn influence other artists. In the above simple and short list, spanning from Caravaggio to Jasper Johns and Lawrence Weiner you can see how one innovative artist’s works inspires another.

Jasper Johns and Lawrence Weiner are contemporary living artists, but my work guarantees that them as prime influencers and thus, blue chip artists who will remain such over coming centuries. I am founding Post Conceptual Art theory – painting with symbols as strokes, which is a radically new step in the history of art. I have taken the inspiration of their letters and numbers and used them as strokes in a traditional painterly manner. In no way am I copying them, but I am standing on their shoulders. If you can afford it, buy the best works of Johns and Weiner – learning this from the likes of me is as close as you can get to insider art trading.

There are other names, including contemporary ones, which are easily recognized that may not be true blue chip artists. It is questionable that their art will influence other artistic innovators. Some of these artists may be incredible artists who quickly followed innovators like Pissarro and Monet and Degas, and as such carved a kind of historic spot for themselves, like Childe Hassam. Yet Hassam was not the innovator, and somehow, as a young girl wandering the Metropolitan and Museum of Modern Art the Impressionists who inspired me were Pissarro and Monet and Degas. Even though I was uneducated, their authenticity of innovation shone through to me.

The innovators are artists who found new techniques and focuses for making art. They do more than simply have their own recognizable style—they have their own unique way.

Many other chains of artistic innovators leading to artistic innovators may be easily constructed. It is kind of like the game of six degrees of separation played out over the timeline of art history.

Second, Less Expensive Way to Invest Profitably in Art

The second way to make “a killing” by investing in art – is to buy the early works of an artistic innovator before they are really discovered and their prices zoom skyward. This is easy advise but historically difficult to do. It is much like recognizing a nascent Google investment opportunity.

Ironically, in Modern and Contemporary times — when dealers are the middlemen between artists and patrons — the work of an emerging artistic innovator is almost always immediately unnoticed, unappreciated and even shunned, especially by the establishment.

When the Impressionists banded together to show their works, they were not only rejected by the establishment, they were ridiculed. Nothing sold.

Andy Warhol’s first show of his now iconic Soup Cans and Brillo Boxes was a complete dud. Nothing sold. His dealer, Irving Blum, took pity on him and bought some of the paintings for a pittance. A few years later this made him a very rich man.

Oh, and van Gogh. His otherwise successful art dealer and brother, Theo, only managed to sell one of his then strange seeming paintings in his lifetime.

Jackson Pollock spent cold winters in Springs, on the Eastern End of Long Island as heat is expensive and his works were not selling.

Lawrence Weiner spent cold winters on his houseboat in the Netherlands as heat is expensive and his works were not selling, although by that time Pollock’s were highly valued..

Why do people fail to immediately see artistic innovators? Ironically the answer is in the question, the work of artistic innovators are actually more difficult to see and understand that the work of artists who have already been accepted and are well known.

To see anything we need similar memories. Ninety percent of vision happens in the brain as it decodes impressions of light received from the eyes. It is actually much easier – and we are more accurate at—perceiving art (or anything) that is more familiar to us. We have more memories of this being art. We have learned to see the older art as art.

Keep in mind that any art that sells well will “inspire” other artists to paint in a similar copy-cat way. Copy-cats are not innovators. There are many “Pop” artists today who have developed slightly different styles from Warhol, Lichtenstein. The puzzle is how to tell if something new that somehow does not seem like art, possible is harder to see or understand as art, is something radical, is actually art or just awful. The questions to ask are: 1.) is this artist painting in a new and unique way that can be copied by others? If the answer to that is yes, the next question that also must be affirmative is: Does this new way (or method, or focus) have the potential to inspire other future artistic innovators?

What the Successful Investor Needs (Besides Money)

Recognized Blue Chip

To discover and collect a work by a recognized blue chip artist you need a great education in art or the help of excellent art dealers and advisers, plus a great deal of money. When an artist-innovator mentions the artists who influenced them, if any are underpriced or valued contemporary artists buy the art of the influencer and the new innovator.

First Dollar I Ever Made by Judy Rey Wasserman

In God We Trust series 

All Strokes: Exodus 20 (Ten Commandments) in Torah Font

Plus numbers, artists signature, “series” and “Exodus 20-Ten Commandments in English.
Original Digital Print combining pen & ink paintings by the artist.

Emerging Investors and Innovators

Finding new innovative artists may also be accomplished through dealers and galleries, especially those that feature emerging artists. However, your fingers can also do the walking online, through sites like artnet.com, artprice.com, the sites the art auction houses, plus, for the really new, by watching and finding artists through social media sites like artists’ blogs, Twitter, Facebook and You Tube. New innovators, those who are currently innovating – rather than hoeing the innovative paths they previously created – are most likely found in places that are also innovative, which at present includes social media.

Investing profitably in art takes money, but not necessarily a great deal of money. Herbert Vogel, a postman, and his wife Dorothy, a librarian in the Brooklyn Public Library, managed to amass a Modern and Contemporary art collection worth a fortune that they donated to the National Gallery. What the Vogels really invested was their time.

The Vogels met and befriended artists and bought works early in the artists’ careers. The only real advantage the Vogels had was their location, they were in New York City before the Internet and then Social Media was invented.

Today work by truly innovative emerging artists can be found for under $5,000 USA , and easily for under $10,000 for good sized works. While New York City remains the center of the Art World, every innovative artist and gallery in NYC, plus most of the rest of the world, can be found on the Internet. Anyone with a PC is in the right place at the right time.

To make collecting this new work more enticing note that almost always the early works of an artist are considered to be the most valuable. For example, only now are Warhol’s later works, such as the large Last Supper paintings, nearing the value of his Soup Cans.

So while the stock market jitters, gold soars and real estate tanks check out investing in art. The images you see, the ideas you come in contact with, the artists you will meet will be much more inspiring and interesting than the average broker. Plus, you are now armed with the insider art knowledge that what you need to find are the innovators.

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews Comments No Comments »

13th Aug 2010

The Revolutionary New Story of 21st Century Art

The new twenty-first century art theory of Post Conceptual Art, including the branch called UnGraven Image makes a revolutionary leap in visual story telling by its use of symbols as strokes. This is the first art theory to ever actually focus upon the stroke.

From the beginning of time great art has been used to tell stories. The ability of art to tell visual stories is powerful. Usually and often found in great art, the story involves symbols, which add depths of meaning.

Great art such as works by van Gogh, Rembrandt, Poussin, Monet and Dali, etc., usually tells a visual story. Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel , Picasso’s Guernica , Da Vinci’s and Warhol’s versions of The Last Supper, all tell stories and include symbols to convey additional visual messages.

Art began as symbolic representation in order to tell the stories and myths of the tribe and its beliefs. For instance, an ancient mask or cave painting of an animal is more likely to symbolize a god or spirit represented by an animal than represent a portrait of a specific animal that was seen or hunted.

Written language developed from symbolic representations. From the earliest writings found to current Chinese, symbols are used to represent ideas, which are then combined to form complex ideas and sentences. A giant leap occurred when symbols were used to represent sounds in speech giving birth to phonetic writing. Letters and numbers are always symbols.

Recent archeological discoveries point to Hebrew as the earliest may be phonetic written languages, but it lacked the symbols for vowels that were famously added by the Phoenicians. Two Hebrew letters of Torah font (the font used for Hebrew Bibles and prayer books by Jews and Christians) can be combined and/or repeated to form any and all of this font’s letters. These basic letters are the yud, which looks much like a comma (‘); and the vav resembles a spear standing upright like a number 1 that lacks the bottom perpendicular base. Each of these letters can be painted, drawn or formed with one stroke. This means Torah font is binary.

Genesis Aleph Sunset

by Judy Rey Wasserman

Acrylic, watercolor pencils and ink, 8.5 x 11 inches
Strokes: Genesis: 1-2:7

Genesis Aleph Sunset is available as an investment quality limited edition of 125 hand signed and numbered fine art archival print. See more images and discover more, including how you can get this artwork for yourself and your loved ones at: https://artofseeingthedivine.com/product/genesis-aleph/

According to its art manifesto by founder Judy Rey Wasserman, Post Conceptual Art uses any alpha or numeric or symbol set for strokes, but the branch of UnGraven Image only uses Torah Font. This is only font or symbol set in the world that is fully binary and phonic. Thus the strokes that create the more complex letters are also symbols themselves that represent sounds and ideas.

UnGraven Image art gets is strokes from original Bible texts. These strokes are used just as traditional artists use strokes. Strokes interweave, are overlapped, and used in layers and as glazes over other strokes. It is impossible to read the tests that comprise an artwork, just as we cannot see the atoms and particles that are the basis for the physical reality that surrounds us.

In Post Conceptual Art, the conceptual understanding of the strokes provides the foundational meaning of a work. This new art is a step away from pure Conceptualism or Word Art back to more traditional art thanks to its use of imagery. Yet the symbols, the concept of the texts used are the basis of each artwork.

Due to its strokes, UnGraven Image Art can be understood as a radical new form of religious art. This upends previous methods of categorizing secular and religious art based upon the imagery of the work. Most of the paintings, drawings and original prints (and planned sculptures) offer secular narratives that are landscapes, portraits or still-life’s, not religious or mythological scenes. So, this artwork can also be classified as secular based on the imagery.

The stories that are told by Post Conceptual and UnGraven Image Art are intrinsic in their strokes. For instance, in the Genesis Sunset-Sunrise series the basic strokes used for each artwork come from Genesis 1:2-7; and, within the Essence Portrait series are portraits of USA presidents that use Exodus 20 (The Ten Commandments) for the strokes referring the executive office’s relationship to laws.

Exodus 20:
10 Commandments
(Abe Lincoln)

As twenty-first century art, Post Conceptual Art, including the branch called UnGraven Image tell stories that are ancient yet visually cutting edge. This art echoes the most famous scientific concerns of our time, such as the search for the smallest particle that is the building block of the physical universe: the Higgs boson or “God particle” at Cern; or the harnessing of energy waves, such as light and wind, for power.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory and its branch known as UnGraven Image portray a radical and innovative new intrinsic, yet hidden, story that could only be told by art of the twenty-first century.

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art Comments No Comments »

14th Jul 2010

Finding Good Art at Art Hamptons 2010

The Art Hamptons fair continues to grow and evolve. This year it showcased $300 million in art from 95 galleries from around the world, according to Rick Friedman, Founder and Executive Director of the show.

The announcement by Scope Hamptons that it would skip this year, no doubt aided Art Hamptons, which for the past two years has reigned as the tony area’s only art fair.

Visually, it is an interesting show as cutting edge emerging contemporary mixes with blue chip artists; and galleries from Asia, Latin America and Europe go toe to toe with local galleries; plus prices range from $2,000.00 to $2 million. Plus, this year’s fair is a carbon-neutral event, an achievement that deserves mention.

Friedman smartly schedules his fair to coincide with other important Hamptons art events, such as the Parrish Art Museum’s Midsummer Party, which occurs the weekend following the July 4 th weekend.

This year’s Lifetime Achievement Award went to artist Donald Sultan, a Sag Harbor resident. The Mary Ryan Gallery held an exhibit of Sultan’s work in their booth.

When I attend fairs, I know I will blog on what I appreciate because I like to share good art and news with my readers who are now often also my friends on sites such as Twitter and Facebook. There is not time or room in a blog to mention everything, but what follows is some of the best of what I found.

Early on in my trek through the fair, I was looking for Caren Golden and here gallery as I always enjoy seeing her and the Caren Golden Fine Art gallery’s artists, which I have mentioned in past blogs. I was well rewarded as I found work by Devorah Sperber , an artist whose work I first saw at the gallery’s booth at a Pulse fair. By then I had my limit of images fort hat blog, but now I have the opportunity to share one here. What you are seeing is spools of thread, used as strokes to create a portrait of Marilyn Monroe.

Devorah Sperber’s Marilyn 2, 2009

I’ve enjoyed shows and openings at Denise Bibro Fine Art in Chelsea and was happy to see this booth. I wanted to include some work by Jerry Meyer, but although Denise graciously offered to allow me to use an image here, due to my blog’s size constraints, I knew the important details would not be easily visible here. In THE HIT PARADE , Meyer presents a kind of juke box display that riffs on senior citizens. Song selections include: By the Hardening of the Arteries band- “Killing Me Softly”, by the Al Zymer and his Orchestra—“Where Did I Put the Car Keys?”, and by Lust to Dust—“I Left My Libedo in Toledo”.

It was fun to chat with local artist James Kennedy, whose was on view at the booth of the Surface Library II, in East Hampton.

As an artist, always enjoy meeting other artists. It was also good to meet Fedele Spadafora who was accompanying his art.

Gallerist Lisa Cooper of Elisa Contemporary Gallery donates a portion of every sale to philanthropic organizations that serve children and families through art. Currently the gallery supports Free Arts NYC and Creative Arts Workshops for kids. It was a pleasure meeting Lisa and seeing the art in her booth.

At Consorcio de Arte there were wonderfully lyrical new all white collage paintings by Paula Rivero, which would be included here, except the constraints of a smallish jpeg image cannot do them justice, as the texturing is what sets this work apart. Thanks to Solange Guez , Co-Director of the gallery, who took me into a separate room to see more of this exciting artist from Argentina.

A.I.R. Gallery was founded in 1972 as the first all women’s gallery in the United States. You do not need to know that to be drawn into their booth by the quality of the art they show. I enjoyed meeting gallery director Kat Griefan and Simone Meltesen, executive assistant.


Daria Dorosh’s Follow the Patter, Scene II

At last year’s fair images by and of Andy Warhol seemed to be everywhere. Although one can almost always find a reference to Warhol at any fair that includes secondary market galleries, this year the splendid glut was gone. However, a wonderful photograph that features Andy and Edie Sedgewick at Tulla Booth Gallery ‘s booth sated my Warhol hunger. Tulla is a charming lady who shows top notch fine art photography in her Sag Harbor gallery.

I enjoyed the work at Tria‘s booth where I discovered work by Casey Voyt, especially “They Came to Snuff the Rooster”. It was delightful to meet gallerists Carol Suchman and Paige Bart who are friendly and helpful. This gallery also supports various arts charities.

This year Mark Humphrey Gallery, hailing from my hometown of Southampton had a booth, which featured prints by Alex Katz, Damien Hirst and Roy Lichtenstein.

Silas Marder Gallery, a young local gallery that the Art Hampton’s fair was represented by a wall—no need for more considering the gallery is actually located next door to the site of the fair!

Moscow’s Galustyan Gallery introduces Russian artists to the world and international artists to Russia. Their booth had a mystical work by Robert Bery, who has helped in a legal fight to protect and extend the rights on NYC Street Artists.

Alexander Calder’s Fish and Faces, 1976

Mark Borghi Fine Art‘s booth is both last and first for me at this fair. Situated at the fair’s entrance i sets the bar. It is also always the last booth I visit, even though using an exit would be more convenient. I double back because I want to refresh my eyes and hold the vision of the works I see there as I leave the fair. Among the Modern Art treasures was an Alexander Calder that delights me with its playfulness and I hope it will do the same for you. In addition to gallery’s in NYC and LA, Mark Borghi maintains a year round gallery on Main Street in Bridgehampton, which has quiet little shows that can rival what is at the local museums in quality.

All images used courtesy of the galleries.

The Art Hamptons fair continues to grow and evolve. This year it showcased $300 million in art from 95 galleries from around the world, according to Rick Friedman, Founder and Executive Director of the show.

The Art Hamptons fair continues to grow and evolve. This year it showcased $300 million in art from 95 galleries from around the world, according to Rick Friedman, Founder and Executive Director of the show.

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews Comments 3 Comments »

20th Apr 2010

How Professionals and Merchants Can Easily Prosper by Bartering for Art

A recession or downturn in the art market is the ideal time for professionals, merchants and people who offer services to collect and prosper from Contemporary Art – through bartering their goods and services in exchange for art.

There are many stories of people who were not otherwise personally connected to artists or galleries who eventually became quite wealthy simply because they bartered goods or services with emerging artists who had a new way of making art. Usually, the connection was happenstance. The artist lived in their neighborhood or area and approached the new collector, who offered to swap with the struggling artist.

Jackson Pollack traded paintings with his local grocer in a small town on the East End of Long Island. People in the area would do their shopping in a small store that was actually “decorated” with original Jackson Pollack paintings. As I recall it, the grocer was not actually fond of the works, but liked Pollock and wanted to help him and his wife, Lee Krasner out. So he traded with them.

Almost every year a dentist is named Adrian Mullish in ArtReview’s Power List of Contemporary Art. Why?

Damien Hirst recalls meeting Mullish in 1990: ‘When I went to see Adrian I had to have some dental treatment which was really expensive. So he just said, “Look, I know you haven’t got any money and you’re an artist. If you give me some art… “

For instance, back in the early 1960’s Pop Artists like Andy Warhol (who did not sell a single Campbell’s Soup Can work at his first solo show) were struggling because they were so different from the then newly recognized and celebrated Abstract Expressionists. That was a great entry level time to invest in artists like Warhol, Lichtenstein, Rauschenberg or Johns. The patrons who commissioned Warhol to create portraits of themselves (at prices then far below the recognized elite portrait artists of the day) ended up owning art that both soared in value and immortalized them, even if they were not celebrities. However, an artist today who is basically creating good Pop Art, but is not one of the original Pop Artists, such as Jasper Johns or Peter Max, may be fun and worthwhile collecting esthetically, but probably is not a great investment.

For investment purposes look for new and emerging artists whose ideas about art and styles have the potential to influence other artists in the future. Look for artistic innovators who are probably doing something radically new and so are not immediately accepted by the establishment.


Exodus 20- Ten Commandments (George Washington)

Strokes are original letters of the scripture text.

Yet, any good art can be understood as a wise or good but not necessarily amazing investment for a frequented by the public where the temperature, lighting and cleanliness conditions are such that the art can be safely displayed. Lawyers, doctors, dentists, accountants and other professional offices provide a good, low humidity climate controlled environment for art.Advertisers, restaurateurs and savvy professional people know that authentic original art contributes to their product’s businesses success. Hotel owners have also noticed this and more and more small hotels display art, including from local artists who are not the groundbreaking type of artists mentioned above, as it does increase repeat business and word of mouth.

While most of the collectors who bartered with twentieth century artists when they were emerging lived in proximity to the artists, thanks to the Internet to some degree we all now live in the same web neighborhood. Twenty-first century artists who are visual trailblazers are certain to be involved in other innovative methods of communication and interaction. Find artists through social media like Twitter or Facebook, where you can find links to their websites.

Try Craig’s List or post through social media sites offering to trade your goods and services for art. Attend local gallery openings. When you meet artists, as many attend openings, hand them your card and suggest that you would be open to barter your services for art.

Today’s innovators have web sites, which usually are different from other artists’ websites, and contain writings as well as artworks. Ask yourself what Warhol, Da Vinci, Rembrandt, Picasso, etc., would have created in a website and how that site might have grown organically, especially before they were renowned and funded. An artist’s website can tell you more about an artist’s potential, because one innovative picture is worth a thousand words on a resume.

* * *

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image.

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.
Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting Comments 3 Comments »

21st Feb 2010

Judy Rey Wasserman’s Essence Self Portrait – Psalm 19

This is my first Essence Portrait of myself.

This self portrait was created as I needed it for a video on the Essence Portrait series. As I worked on the upcoming video slides and script it became apparent that a portrait of me was glaringly missing and that just using my photo or film of myself was weird within the context of the presentation.

Yet what finally motivated me to concentrate on myself, when my natural gaze is outward, way from myself, was the accidental fall I experienced a few weeks ago, which resulted in stitches on my forehead, a large bandage wrapping my head and now a scar. My face with black and blue eyes, puffy, and bandaged intrigued me as a painter. I lack vanity being a natural born clown,  so I found the look most interesting and inspirational to paint. The bandage reminded me of van Gogh’s self portrait after he lost part of his ear, only his bandage was vertical and mine horizontal.

However it seemed bizarre that my first self portrait would be of myself as the walking wounded.

The strokes are all from the words of Psalm 19, my favorite. The initial Essence Portrait was of Andy Warhol and that one is also created using Psalm 19 for the strokes. It seems appropriate for Warhol also. To date these are the only two of my Essence Portraits that use this psalm.

This is actually a double self portrait as like my other works I signed it with my self portrait signature logo. The video about my signature logo portrait is embedded below this new basic Essence Portrait below.

Psalm 19 (Judy Rey Wasserman) Essence Portrait

   *  *  *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art Comments No Comments »

17th May 2009

Interview Magazine Uses Warhol Portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman as Twitter Avatar

Tuesday, May 12, began as most days do with me still groggy, drinking my morning coffee while saying: “Good morning” on Twitter. It seemed like an ordinary day until a Direct Message (DM) from friend Brian Sherwin (@myartspace_blog ) asked if my portrait of Andy Warhol was the avatar being used by Interview Magazine @Interviewmag for Twitter.

I know Brain Sherwin through Twitter and Facebook where we have become friends. He is aware of my work and the new theory of Post Conceptual Art that I am founding. Aside from our love of art we share something else. We get and function well in the new world of Social Media. Brian’s blog is one of the highly recognized art blogs. I am the top rated fine artist plus am in the Twitter elite according to both wefollow.com twittergrader based on the number of followers I have (over 67,000) and my active participation. Brain and I each head up Facebook Groups (mine is Sharing a Transforming Vision with over 375 members), plus I have a new fan page.

Brian Sherwin deserves credit for discovering that my work was being used by Interview Magazine as their Twitter avatar. However his initial contact to me was in the form of a question as I had not been promoting Interview Magazine nor the fact my work was representing their Twitter account as I naturally would do.

Here are my initial Tweets to Interview Magazine on Twitter:

@InterviewMag Avatar you’re using is my portrait of Andy Warhol w.Psalm 19 4 strokes. If U credit me & link to my site it’s OK 2 use it.

@InterviewNews OMGosh! You’re using my Psalm 19 portrait of Andy W. for this Twitter avatar 2. My eyes actually filled w. tears of joy TY!

@InterviewMag See: Andy Warhol is a Grandfather to Post Conceptual Art http://is.gd/zaoy [Follow me- I can’t follow U /any1 til later 2day]

Clearly my initial, and to some extent continuing response is one of joy that Interview Magazine thought highly enough of my work to use it to represent them. The I tweeted the news to both @artnetdotcom and @whitehotmag,, which are well respected online art magazine Twitter members and friends who I follow and who follow me back. That I ReTweet (RT) art news from those members, Brian’s blog and other art sources but had never RT’d Interview Magazine. At that point I was unaware of Interview magazine’s Twitter presence, plus I tend to RT members who follow me back.

So I called Interview Magazine’s offices, which is Brandt’s publishing and also publishes Art in America. I was put brought to someone who supposedly dealt with their Twitter accounts. I was busy thanking him enthusiastically for using my work when we somehow—and not from my end— were disconnected.

It seemed reasonable and possibly beyond serendipity that Interview Magazine would want to use my portrait of Warhol. According to their posts on their Facebook fan page to promote Interview magazine’s Twitter account on April 24. This seems to naturally follow my blog post from April 17 that Andy Warhol is a Grandfather to Post Conceptual Art. That blog had used my Warhol portrait as an illustration.

Hoping for the best, and still bubbling with joy over the serendipity of having my portrait of Andy Warhol used to represent the magazine that he founded to be the hippest and most avant garde promoter of art, fashion and people I called back This time the phone receptionist sent me to some male who was higher up. I explained how happy I am to have my portrait of Andy Warhol used as Interview Magazine’s Twitter avatar but needed the work attributed to me somewhere. And, again we were disconnected.

I had not asked for anything but credit for my portrait indicating that I was—and still would be—happy for Interview magazine to use the work as long as I receive credit. Perhaps I am naïve, but when someone is happy with me and friendly I am polite and friendly back.

Still, I remained positive and hopeful determined to create good buzz about the fact that my work was selected by Interview Magazine to represent them on Twitter while the conversation with Brian continued in the stream and with other Twitter members who follow either of us.

New media, especially social media person that I am, I kept watching my Twitter stream and Facebook Fan Page wall for a message from Interview Magazine. I was still thinking that the true spirit of Andy Warhol – who was as cutting edge as they come while retaining both cultural and spiritual historical sensibilities—was guiding Interview Magazine. He would have thrived in this new Social Media.

@ myartspace_blog Warhol who also painted religious art is looking down on this & smiling. His portrait’s cre9ted w. my fav Psalm 19.

Then Brian discovered that Interview Magazine was using my Portrait of Andy Warhol for their avatar on their Interview News account.

In the meantime, Brian and I are carrying out a conversation in the Twitter stream and in direct messages (DMs). Although I had recently Tweeted that Twitter is where I get my breaking news, I never expected to be a part of it, even in my small way via my Tweets.

Several weeks previous to this, when the Shepard Fairy trial was making news, Brian Sherwin and I had a long and detailed series of emails regarding Artist’s Rights. Brian is a champion of our rights and although I do not always agree with his tactics we are in full agreement that more needs to be done to protect and inform artist’s rights. I am for educating artists, legislators, enforcement officials, educators, etc., plus opening dialogues as there is a lot of new technology and media that needs to be addressed. Brian’s focus includes mine but he also focuses on specific perceived or adjudicated wrongs and copyright infringements.

I am aware that founding a Post Conceptual Art theory, including the called UnGraven Image puts me in a kind of leadership position. That UnGraven Image is the first theory of religious art (fully inclusive for all) founded in the USA means that need to always take the high road to the best of my ability, especially I the art world. I don’t have the luxury of not standing up for artist’s rights. Brian knows this. Certainly neither of us expected that I would be facing an infringement of my copyright only a few weeks later.

As we continued to message in the stream, I remained very happy about the situation and eager to have my work represent Interview magazine as long as it was attributed to me. Frankly, at that point the idea of receiving monetary compensation did not enter my mind as the recognition and public relations that comes my way from this is a kind of compensation that money cannot buy. Especially as I continue to assert my strong Post Conceptual hereditary art link to Andy Warhol. It seemed fitting that the magazine on the cutting edge in the last century would position itself with Twenty-first century Post Conceptual Art.

In a DM Brian Sherwin informed me that he had a contact at Art in America, which is also owned by Peter Brant, about the avatar situation.

Later that afternoon Kelly Brant called me from the Art in America offices. Kelly is Peter Brant’s daughter and responsible for the online presence of their three magazines.

Excited and happy to finally hear back from someone, this time I managed to hit the button weirdly located on the back of my land-line receiver so we were disconnected. I guess it was fair, except I called back immediately and apologized for the hang up. It surprised me that Kelly was not by now familiar with my web site, that she had not discovered I was founding a new theory of art as mentioned above, have a free PDF manifesto booklet to download, new videos, including on You Tube that have over 1,500 views, etc. What she did know am one of the most followed people on Twitter and an artist.

Kelly was surprised when I explained that the portrait was created by hand with pen and ink symbol-strokes that are the Torah letters of Psalm 19. It is not a manipulated photograph. She asked what my reference was and I answered that I had used several different images that are online.

Kelly Brant had a three o’clock appointment so she called me back about 15 minutes later and we resumed our friendly conversation.

This did concern Kelly as she mentioned the recent Shepard Fairey case regarding the Hope portrait of Barack Obama. However, I had used several reference images, plus there were no multiples being sold, so there was and is no possibility of copyright infringement on my part. Recent court cases ruled in favor of Richard Prince and Jeff Koons as their work is original, not simply digital manipulation, although they referenced other works.

The idea of the Essence Portraits comes from the understandings that our bodies are essentially created of the energy/pre-matter of elementary physics’ strings, which my symbols always refer to, plus we have within us the essence of The Divine. From this first portrait and continuing, I want to show what lies beneath, the essence of a person through these portraits. As with any of my works, while our minds perceive narrative imagery all that is really on the canvas or paper are letters form a text. When we look at my portrait of Andy Warhol, what we really see is Psalm 19 in the original Torah font, which Warhol’s Eastern Orthodox Church reveres.

This Warhol portrait focuses on the expression, the vulnerable punk angry brood that Andy Warhol revealed in his iconic self portrait, Twice Denied. That portrait is full face. I found a photograph that I could use for basic features that is ¾ face while changing the expression to that in Twice Denied. I also referenced many pictures and portraits of Warhol’s wild hair and wig. Clearly he used that feature to sort of hide behind, so in life people would be drawn to the hair that seemed to distract from his face. So my work uses the whole of the white space as the hair and only suggests it. Thus in my portrait the white becomes the hair and a sort of support for the portrait. Plus, of course, I did this in a very minimal way to pay homage to Warhol’s own work.

By the end of the conversation Kelly and I were looking on our computers for place where the mention could reside. She offered a mention on their Twitter profiles, but I declined that as it is such a limited space for them to use to better define the magazine. We thought the bottom right hand column of the online magazine would do but I remained open as long as I was credited somewhere. She then said she would have to ask legal and we agreed to speak the next day.

I was prepared and quite happy to make an announcement that there was just a misunderstanding and that I and Brandt communications have a good relationship and there is no problem. I still hope to make that statement. It is difficult for me to see that this publicity, which I am sure will linger can do anything but help found my career and Post Conceptual Art. If Andy Warhol is looking down on this I bet he is enjoying my current 15 minutes of fame.

I was eager to announce that my work is being used with my permission once I was receiving credit for it from Interview Magazine.

I went off to run some errands land when I returned my portrait of Warhol had been replaced by a photograph on both Interview Twitter accounts.

Brian and I emailed back and forth about that and more. Brian raises many good points and questions. However, I preferred to wait to hear again from Kelly. I hoped that my image would be used and I would receive public credit or at least acknowledgment of my work. I remained enthusiastic that my work had been viewed as important enough to represent Interview Magazine on Twitter. Whether Interview Magazine or anyone at Brandt publishing ever credits me the witnesses and screen shots prove that fact.

I asked Brian to hold off writing his article for just one more day. This was quite a request considering Brian had made the discovery, it was a breaking art news story and controversy, plus it deals with the topic of artist’s rights, which he champions.

The next morning my ongoing Google search greeted me with Brian’s just published controversial article. My first reaction was that I really need to stay off the Internet until I’ve had my first cup of coffee.

Brian Sherwin’s article on article myartspace>blog is a must read. Interview Magazine Copyright Infringement Controversy on Twitter and Facebook . There are many comments to his article and I urge you to leave yours.

All of facts that involve me personally are correct and Brian Sherwin uses my image with permission, plus he credits me. The points he make deserve consideration at least. Brian’s article placed me in the controversy where I would have to respond in some way.

I look forward to a second chapter and blog about my relationship with Interview Magazine and Peter Brandt’s communications media. I suspect some surprising twists and turns as I strive to take the high road. You can scroll down past the previous post to see a larger image Psalm 19 (Andy Warhol) and also read Andy Warhol is a Grandfather to Post Conceptual Art . You are encouraged to leave comments on any of my blogs and please include your Twitter ID and other social media info so others can easily find you!  All Avatars shown in this post are used courtesy of the Twitter members or they are blurred.

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art Comments 4 Comments »

20th Mar 2009

Is the Way Contemporary Art is Marketed Going to Crash with the Market?

In these tough economic times the market for Contemporary art is suffering. Galleries are closing or letting go of staff, auctions are seeing prices drop and lots remain unsold. But is it the art that is taking a hit or the way it is marketed?

Historically art dealers and galleries are relatively new. Artists had patrons and commissions from the wealthy and institutions that were both religious, governmental or the wealthy.

While the road ahead many be bumpy for some artists, it is always difficult for artists who have a new or truly unique (vs. touted as such) to offer. Just about every great artist has been derided and had difficulties not because of any current economic situation, but due to the establishment.

As an artist who is founding a theory of Post Conceptual Art the establishment concerns me more than the economy. The economy was not a problem for the Impressionists, Post Impressionists, Dadaists, Abstract Expressionists and Pop Artists as they emerged– but the establishment was.

Will new and actually pioneering artists forge new ways of emerging that will further impact the way art is traded, bought and sold? Will artists find new ways to emerge and make their work known via the Internet, through Social Media sites like Twitter and Facebook?

If galleries are not managing to sell work to support their artists, will artists band together more to stage their own exhibits as the Impressionists and the YBAs did at first?

While Contemporary Art may not be a sure investment bet, certainly the work of great respected artists, the van Goghs, Monets, Picasso, etc. will continue to be a better investment than almost anything. Historically great fine art (especially two dimensional works), gold, precious gems & jewelry retain more of their value in difficult times and may gain more in boon times.

The aesthetic converges with the market worth when artists who inspire other artists, and especially inspire newer theories and movements are understood as being the greatest artists. Thus, a contemporary artist can be best judged in the future by those new artists who are inspired by him or her.

However, savvy investors and dealers will discover the new artists who have real and even radical theory. They will have to as so much of the look-a-like popular (but snazzy) Contemporary work that has been shown in the past few years is being devalued. When an artist’s work is reduced they become more difficult to sell and it can take years to regain the past level. When this occurs the artist is like someone who is unemployed – and it is far easier to find a job (or a sale or commission) when one is employed (hot).

When the news media proclaims that the art market is also suffering in these tough economic times, it needs to make the connection that what is taking a hit is the way that art is marketed is suffering. Dealers, auction houses, advisers, etc. are suffering from reductions in sales and prices. Galleries are closing or letting staff go.

The last recession demonstrated that new and emerging artists whose works were too new to be devalued were the one’s to find and collect. These artists are often easy to find as an artist who is radically creating a new kind of art sticks out like a sore thumb, especially today as searches for “contemporary art theory”, contemporary art manifesto”, “contemporary radical art”, “Post Conceptual Art”, and similar will turn up a slew of leads and pages to follow. Clearly one should follow for many pages as a new artists are not paying for ad words or dealing with SEO marketing. But, any cutting edge artist will be on the Internet, probably active in social media and have a web site and probably a blog.

The current question for the art market is will the dealers and investors find the artists before new ways of marketing art are developed by these artists? In Thomas Friedman’s “Flat World” a modern Da Vinci, Rembrandt, van Gogh, Pollack, Vermeer, and all of the original Impressionists, plus many others would have reached out beyond their cities, patrons and dealers to reach more people and make more contacts. Would they have developed followers on Twitter? Fan pages and groups on Facebook? Possibly, considering they were excellent communicators who had ties to other artists and people in their communities who were not part of the artistic establishment of their day. For the above mentioned great artists and for many others, the first purpose of being an artist is not to make money but to communicate to people—to reach and inspire art. Thanks to the Internet, whatever the current economy, we artists can continue to do that.

Artists will continue to make art. It is what we do, whatever the economy or market. New art theories will develop and new artists will emerge. It is up to today’s dealers, gallerists and art experts to discover these new artists before they are replaced by paradigms of art marketing the way that the City-States, Church-State patronage, and other art societies, marketing and commissioning establishments of the past were replaced.

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews Comments 2 Comments »

12th Mar 2009

Collecting Fine Art Prints Tips for 2009 — Part 2

During an economic downturn fine art, especially easily transported two dimensional art, such as paintings and prints remain a solid investment value Investing in prints by known and emerging, but soon to be significantly recognized artists are generally a low cost entry into art collecting. Although there are no guarantees when investing in a work of art that the art will increase in value over time, there are ways for a collector to invest wisely.

Print collectors need to know and understand specific concepts of collecting art and prints.

The Importance of Provenance

There are two art markets, primary and secondary. The primary market sells works that are brand new, while the secondary market deals with works that have been owned.

Van Gogh never made money as an artist, but his paintings were documented, both in his letters to his brother and others and also by his brother. Modern and contemporary artists who believe in themselves and their work begin to keep records of their work fairly quickly, or they find someone to do this for them, such as a gallery owner or dealer. Aside from problems caused by wars, looting, natural disasters and theft, the whereabouts of most valuable fine art is known. There are companies and web sites that keep records of fine art provenance that most dealers and galleries have access to for a fee. This includes prints. Following the trail of a work of fine art’s ownership is termed provenance. Keeping records of the trail prevents forgery and also helps museums and curators know who to ask for a loan of art for a special exhibit as well as informing dealers and buyers as to whom to approach to buy particular works.

For artists whose work will appreciate over time, keeping records of provenance is very important. Good artists do care about their works, reputation and their collectors and agents. If a gallery, dealer or web site happily takes a buyer’s credit card or cash and does not note down the buyer’s information, print name and number (at least on a formal bill of sale), plus inform the buyer of the need to contact someone upon the work’s changing hands, well, that says a whole lot about the seller’s belief in the value of this art. This goes even triple for original paintings!

Artists and publishers know about the importance of this and keep records about their works when editions are created with respect for the real fine art market.

Types of Prints

There are many types of prints including lithographs, etchings, silk screens and the newer Giclees. All photographs are prints. Large scale fine art photography is often printed on the same presses as are Giclees, the difference being the the colors of the black pigments used and the paper type.

Another term for Giclee is digital print. This type of print is quickly becoming more accepted and valuable. However, the collector needs to take serious precautions to discover the inks and media used to create a print, especially a Giclee or photograph. Since these are easy to produce some artists are knocking out copies — and seeing them– on regular printers. Personally, I know one who uses a color copy machine and signs and frames the works. While these prints appear fresh, they are not worth owning as within 10 years they will fade badly even in the best conditions.

However, a true Giclee created with pigment inks will last for generations to come. If the Giclee is a limited edition signed print from an artist whose value rises the work will rise in value along with the artist’s paintings.

In the world of Modern Art, Andy Warhol’s silk screen prints demonstrate the investment value a print can have. Although in the recent boom times dealers drove the prices for these up, even inflated them, anyone who bought one of Warhol’s prints early on made one of the better investments available in the Twentieth Century that has held it’s value today better that almost every other investment.

The trick is to find an emerging Warhol — someone with a new way of creating art, a real theory and unique style.

Prints as an Investment

Many people have bought fine art as an investment and made money. Some people managed to get on the cutting edge, in at the very beginning with a new artist or a new movement and they made a lot of money. A dentist was recently listed in Art Review‘s 2005 list of the most prominent people in the art world. Why? Because two artists who traded their work when they were emerging artists for his dental care have become highly successful!

There are some other artists who many have paintings that are worth a lot of money, but really their print editions are so large that investing in them is plain silly. People who own those prints have no market for them and I have seen then sold for less than half of the original price on Ebay. Do not buy a fine art edition that has more than 700 prints in it, whether it is a reproduction print or an original print. Some artists and publishers try to get around that by calling editions of the same image by different edition names, such as Centennial Edition or Anniversary Edition. It should really be named the “Taking Advantage of Our Previous Collectors” edition.

Changing sizes is another way to hedge on the real number of prints. That one is tricky and something the buyer and the artist, even good, honest artists have to take care to research and properly represent. A good question to ask when considering purchasing any print is, “How many signed and numbered prints of this image are there in total?”

Genesis Aleph

by Judy Rey Wasserman

Edition of 125

Limited  Edition signed and numbered print Available at Art of Seeing The Divine

The general rule of thumb is all signed prints for any image should not exceed 750. Warhol got around this by using his black photographic silk screened image over different colored backgrounds. The smaller the print’s edition the more valuable it is within that artist’s same sized works. For instance Artist XYZ’s a single print from an edition of 125 signed 11 x 14 inch prints is generally worth more than a single print from the same time period from an signed edition of 500.

Sometimes posters for a specific event are also sold as fine art prints. Often some are signed by the artist. This is different from the print edition and does not count against the rarity of the original prints. Usually the posters either commemorate an art show or are used to raise money for a charity or non-profit even. A true fine art poster should be published with archival media. Sometimes posters are just posters, and as such, cannot be relied on to last for generations, even with proper care. As with all editions, a limited edition is worth more for the collector than a similar quality work in an unlimited or larger edition.

Often fine art editions have a separate category called, “Artist’s Proofs”. These groups of prints, which are always in relation to a print edition, never a stand alone edition are a remnant of the old tradition of the print publisher giving artists a small number of prints of any edition. Artists proofs were then sold by the artists themselves. They were thought to be more valuable since they were almost always signed and had been in he artist’s very own hands. Also, they were usually amongst the earlier prints (thus they were proofs) so the image might be clearer and the lines or images finer. There was a time this term made sense.

In today’s world of contemporary prints, the term “Artist Proof” is a marketing ploy to entice a buyer to pay more for the same item based on an often fictitious or at least scurrilous title. If a publisher offers “Artist’s Proofs” for sale, then probably the item is not fine art in the first place. By definition the artist is the person selling the proofs, not the publisher! If the artist is the publisher, or hires the publisher then by definition, all of the prints are really Artist Proofs.

Prints or posters based on fine art images, which are not signed by the artist and/or are issued in large numbers or unlimited editions may be great decorations but are not fine art that anyone should collect and hope for an increase in value. For instance, currently there are lovely Giclee on canvas prints of Renoir’s work. There are also posters of his work, some are even certified and in “fine art” editions by museums. The Boston Museum is selling beautiful archival prints. They are a great decoration, but they are not a great fine art investment.

Summary

Fine art prints can provide an introduction to art collecting as well as a lower cost way to collect the work of an artist. A print collector needs to carefully research the value of collecting an artist just as a painting collector would. In the secondary market provenance is always important. In the primary market finding an artist whose work will appreciate is always key to a good art investment.  Generally, finding the work of an emerging artist whose work will become renowned is the best investment one can make. Next, in a down market, find a private seller who needs to sell a work by a well renowned artist, but get that work professionally appraised and authenticated before buying it!

For the first article in this two part series see: Collecting Fine Art Prints Tips for 2009 — Part 1

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Bible Art Comments 3 Comments »

20th Feb 2009

Collecting Fine Art Prints Tips — Part 1

Collecting fine art, including fine art prints can be a fun and rewarding experience. Savvy investors know that along with gold, fine art can make the best investment in any economy, and this is especially true in a bad one.

Fine art prints allow investors the luxury of collecting works that are less expensive. However, a real fine art print (kept in good condition) holds its worth relative to the work of a particular artist.  Thus collecting the prints of an emerging art leader or star or a real blue chip artist can be an excellent investment in a recession when money is tight but needs to be kept secure.

What’s a Fine Art Print?

There is a difference between a fine art print and a print for decoration. A hand signed Warhol of a limited edition print of Marilyn Monroe, Poppies or a Campbell’s Soup Can is worth a lot more than a poster or even the best possible archival Giclee or reproduction, even if it is officially created by the Warhol foundation. That’s because the artist himself should be involved in the issuance of the print since the artist is the only person who has the right to say the print matches their unique artistic vision for it. It’s like the difference between making the recipe of a famous chef vs. having the chef prepare the recipe for you.

There are many factors to consider when collecting fine art prints, and some of them are also important when collecting any fine art. To be truly classified as a fine art print the image or artwork itself has to have a certain quality, usually the artist has a style all of his or her own, plus the work has to be a fairly limited edition, and should be numbered and signed or at the very least initialed by the artist. Very recently, due to wonderful technical advances, archival prints that are reproductions of an original painting or drawing are now being considered as true fine art when they meet the above criteria. Partially, artists have fine art photographers and the acceptance of these prints by their market to thank for this development. Fine art digital prints are currently so accepted by the art market that at a recent PMA attendees were informed of a 26 x 90 inch Epson print, which sold for sold for $1.2 million.

Consider the Quality of the Artist

Whatever the medium of the print, the first consideration is the quality of the artist’s work. The best archival print in the world by a lousy artist won’t grow as an investment. It’s a nice thing to have if that print is an archival reproduction of a painting by one’s child created in kindergarten. The original that was made with poster paint on newsprint will fade and deteriorate over time. Still, although have such a print may well be a great investment of time and money for its sentimental worth, is not going to increase in market value outside of the original family.

Watermill Sunset

Judy Rey Wasserman’s Genesis Series 

First and foremost  the buyer should like the art that is collected. If the art doe not communicate and even move or inspire, do not buy it. The art world is full of Emperors who are not wearing any clothes but are highly touted by galleries and critics. The more a collector learns, the more savvy the collector, but one should always trust one’s own gut feeling.

The best artist to collect is an one who is emerging with a look that’s all their own or even one who is on the begging curve of a new movement. For instance, find and collect the next Andy Warhol (Pop), Donald Judd (Minimalism), Dali (Surrealist) or Jenny Holtzer (Word/Text) and watch the value of your collection grow astronomically! The chances of achieving this are better than winning the lottery. Damien Hirst’s dentist showed up on the list of Art Review’s 2005’s most important people in the contemporary art world. Why? Because he traded his dental services for art work when Hirst was just starting out.

Another way to create a collection is to buy the best work that can be afforded by a living established and respected artist. The value of an artist’s work usually (but not always) increases posthumously. That’s because from the supply of art from that artist is complete and thus limited.

Always keep in mind that Unique styles are what differentiate good or competent artists from great ones.

The Print’s Quality

A fine art print should be highly archival to be worth anything, even if it shows the work of a budding new Rembrandt or Monet. If the print is not created with highly archival inks and media (paper, canvas or other material) then very shortly work by even the best artist will be worth zilch. This information applies to any kind of print, including but not limited to etchings, silk screens, digital giclees, etc. Collectors should always inquire as to the archival properties of any print before making a purchase.

There are artists who do competent jobs out at fairs and shows selling works made on non-archival media with standard ink jets. Artists even sell color photocopies of their works, already framed to unsuspecting collectors at fairs. I’ve seen it done! At first, that photocopy looks sharp. The photocopy will fade within a year, even if kept in the most archival quality conditions. It is perfectly legal for an artist to sell such work as a print, because a photocopy is a print. It’s not an archival fine art print, but it is a print. Let the buyer beware.

Authenticity

Every buyer of a limited edition fine art print deserves a Certificate of Authenticity. Certificate of Authenticity should have the name of the artist, print, issue number of this specific print (and that should match the hand numbering on the print itself), date of issue, total number in the edition, physical dimensions of the print and it should be signed by the artist (hopefully) or the fine art printer, especially if the print is new. Older prints should have a COA issued by an appraiser who is an authority on that artist or by the artist’s foundation (such as the Warhol foundation), which includes all known provenance information for that print.

This certificate helps establish that the owner has an original print. Unfortunately, forgery and theft in the art world are not all that rare. Whoever holds the certificate holds strong proof of ownership of the original work. When one buys a car one gets title of ownership and when one buys fine art the buyer receives a certificate or some sort of legal and approved authentication. For a new work, the buyer should demand a COA, or walk away from the purchase. In today’s digital age of computers and copy machines, a COA should look professional and even artistic.

If the buyer is not dealing directly with one of the artist’s dealers, galleries or the artist herself, it is wise to do some research through the artist’s real representatives or the artist herself or through a reputable dealer or gallery to ensure that he print is authentic. The buyer would be wise to save the receipt along with the COA. It is further a proof of ownership and documents the price of the work at the time of sale. Keep these documents stored where other important documents are kept.

UnGraven Image Fine Art Publishing issues a Certificate of Authenticity that even has a special code known only to the publisher, seller and buyer. A different code is issued for every single print. A record is kept every print’s owner, their current address, the code, etc. This record is updated regularly, placed on a duplicate disk and stored in a bank safe deposit box. The code and record keeping for provenance further protects the owner against any forgery or theft since one must know the code to prove ownership.

Although pices for art, including prints, have fallen due to the recession, they have not fallen nearly as much as those for most other investments. The fine art print market is a strong market currently according to statistics collected by Informart magazine, Artexpeditor and sales information from the auction houses including Sotheby’s and Christie’s. Although there are no guarantees when investing in a work of art that the art will increase in value over time, there continue to be methods to use that allow an investor to collect wisely.

Next Week- Part 2

* * *

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art Collecting Comments 2 Comments »