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Archive for the 'Art Theory & Show Reviews' Category

01st Oct 2021

How to See an Image of the Song of Songs

Solomon’s Song of Songs is known as the love song of the Bible. Like the psalms, it was chanted in biblical times and continues to be chanted and sung in synagogues today. It symbolizes our love story with G-D, both personally and as a people. Thus, the title, “Song of Songs.”

How to Turn the Song of Songs into an Image?

In Genesis chapter 1, the Creator speaks the physical universe into being. According to basic theology held by all branches and denominations of Jews and Christians, the letters of those Hebrew words are the basis – the smallest initial components of the physical universe.

Twenty first century elementary physicists discovered that most basic and tiniest building blocks –the basis of the physical universe present as either pre-mass units or energy units.  They call these “strings”. There are amazing parallels between only one font in the world, the Hebrew Torah font of the Bible, and the strings of elementary physics. These correlations can be seen in a short video, Painting with the Big Bang of Genesis, available on ungravenimage.com, the sidebar of this blog, and You Tube, plus it’s completely explained in The Manifesto of Post Conceptual UnGraven Image ArtA Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Strokes.

So, how to turn the Song of Songs into an image? By using the original Torah font Hebrew letters of Song of Songs as each stroke to create the image of the Swan Lovers artwork. This visually represents the biblical theology, plus the concept of strings as the basis of physical reality.

The strokes are used in the ways traditional artists use strokes, they are overlapped, interwoven, and used as glazes. Here and there a letter “peeks” out, but even people who can easily read the Hebrew cannot read the scripture texts. The strokes also mimic the invisible-to-us strings that are smaller than atoms, which link together to form atoms and then compounds, overlapping, interweaving, and layering together to form our dimension of the physical universe.

Why use Swans to Portray Song of Songs?

Close up of multi colored version of Swan Lovers (Song of Songs) by Judy Rey Wasserman. The strokes are all the original Torah font letters from Song of Songs.

Swans can mate for life – usually. A small percentage of the time they break up, or stray. The numbers for this behavior are at around 3% for swans that have successfully bred and around 9% for those birds yet to breed or have had a failed breeding season. They can reunite and resume their relationship that then lasts a lifetime.

“I am my beloved’s, and my beloved is mine…”  — Song of Songs 6:3

Swan Lovers Song of Songs by Judy Rey Wasserman. The strokes in this black and white version are all the original Torah font letters from Song of Songs.

How is Swan Lovers Created with Scripture?

In its essential form, in black and white, this artwork shows a loving and romantic pure white swan couple. The entire image was created using only strokes that are the original Torah font letters from the complete Song of Songs, chapters 1-8.

The multi-colored version of Swan Lovers is additionally painted with watercolor pencils. Using watercolor pencils allows me to write the Torah font letters from the scriptures. Then I go over them with a wet paint brush, also using brushes loaded with water to “write” more scripture verses on the waters. Writing with the wet brush allows the pigments from the colored pencils to flow out.

Close up of multi colored version of Swan Lovers (Song of Songs) by Judy Rey Wasserman. The strokes are all the original Torah font letters from Song of Songs.

The water’s colors are created with scripture letter-strokes of blues and greens. The birds’ beaks use letter-strokes of orange with shading of reds and pinks. The feathers are shaded with cool violet hues.  

“Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth: for thy love is better than wine.” – Song of Songs 1:2

Do you believe in the Power – Transforming – Power of Scripture?

Swan Lovers Song of Songs by Judy Rey Wasserman. The strokes in this multi-colored version are all the original Torah font letters from Song of Songs.

The romantic artwork of Swan Lovers (Song of Songs) romantic artwork is more than inspirational art. Since it is created only of the Song of Song scripture it is a way to bless a couple’s relationship. Hang it in the bedroom or the hallway leading to the bedroom. It can bless your home, or it can be an appreciated gift for the home blessing an engaged or newly married couple. It also makes a loving anniversary gift, or romantic gift for your sweetheart.

“He brought me to the banqueting house, and his banner over me was love. Song of Songs 2:4

Bring home this scripture wall art home today via the shop at https://artofseeingthedivine.com/product/swan-lovers-song-of-songs-written-on-the-wind-series/

See more now. Live inspired.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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10th Sep 2021

How to Transform the Way You See Divine

Change your vision to change your life series

By Judy Rey Wasserman

We maneuver through our days based upon how we perceive the physical reality around us. The sense of vision is the basic go-to form of perception for the majority of people. A quick search on Google shows that 65% of people are primarily visual learners – a “percentage fact” that is disputed, but it could be an even larger percentage.

Sighted people rely on their visual perception to recognize or affirm:

  • Who and/or what is in their immediate vicinity
  • What is happening around them
  • Where they are
  • What time of day it is
  • How they of those around them are feeling, how they are accomplishing tacks, and even how to proceed with further action

If you noticed that the above bullet point list is formed using the who, what, where, when and how of journalism (news casting), you are correct.  Much of our information, even when spoken through radio, podcast or talking head newscast show, has it basis in how people visually perceive.  Even so, the oft repeated “one picture is worth a thousand words” results in illustrations or videos of events – or products – preferred by viewers and buyers.

Our eyes are only capable of seeing impressions of light. Our brains decode the impressions received from the eyes by comparing it to other previous impressions of light. We see through our memories. The more similar memories we have the easier it is to “see” (recognize) who or what is before us.

Along with our visual memories come remembrances that seemed significant, or at lease somehow useful information pertaining to those memories. These “attached” memories can include perceptions by other senses, plus value-based ideas and decisions. For instance, looking at a photo of a favorite food can evoke memories of smell, taste and even ouch, including the food’s temperature. A simple photograph can also bring memories of previous ideas and decisions about that food, such as it is a favorite, it is good, a heathy food, a fattening food, and even decisions by the viewer about the happiness consuming the food will generate.

You probably have a favorite food. Perhaps, you call it a comfort food.

Pause for a moment a picture one of your favorite foods in your mind. Image its taste, its scent and feel. Is it salty or sweet? Crisp, chewy, or soft – or a combination? Served hot, warm, room temperature or cold? Imagine that you are tasting this food right now. Give yourself enough time enjoying your food imagining, and then continue reading.

To create the previous food imagining you used your perceptual memories of experiences involving that food.

Conceptual artists aim to provoke thoughts and memories, by using the viewer’s visual perception. Word Art is a form of Conceptual Art. Word Art is a form of Conceptual Art that uses words to provoke images and ideas.

Let’s do a visual memory changing art exercise using a Word art experience to inspire change in how you see the divine.

The word “divine”, D-i-V-i-N-E contains two i letters, which was specifically emphasized in the way it was just written. See them?

There is a kind of homonym type sound-alike between the name of the letter i and the word eye. When spoken their names match.

The play of sounds in English — eye and aye are pronounced the same — adds another level of positive or affirmative information.

Between those two ieyes is a letter V.  Thus: i V i

If we slightly raise the i letters to towards the top-of-the-line height and turn the i letters 45 degrees counterclockwise, we get:

We maneuver through our days based upon how we perceive the physical reality around us. The sense of vision is the basic go-to form of perception for the majority of people. A quick search on Google shows that 65% of people are primarily visual learners – a “percentage fact” that is disputed, but it could be an even larger percentage.

Sighted people rely on their visual perception to recognize or affirm:

  • Who and/or what is in their immediate vicinity
  • What is happening around them
  • Where they are
  • What time of day it is
  • How they of those around them are feeling, how they are accomplishing tacks, and even how to proceed with further action

If you noticed that the above bullet point list is formed using the who, what, where, when an how of journalism (news casting), you are correct.  Much of our information, even when spoken through radio, podcast or talking head newscast show, has it basis in how people visually perceive.  Even so, the oft repeated “one picture is worth a thousand words” results in illustrations or videos of events – or products –preferred by viewers and buyers.

Our eyes are only capable of seeing impressions of light. Our brains decode the impressions received from the eyes by comparing it to other previous impressions of light. We see through our memories. The more similar memories we have the easier it is to “see” (recognize) who or what is before us.

Along with our visual memories come remembrances that seemed significant, or at lease somehow useful information pertaining to those memories. These “attached” memories can include perceptions by other senses, plus value-based ideas and decisions. For instance, looking at a photo of a favorite food can evoke memories od smell, taste and even ouch, including the food’s temperature. A simple photograph can also bring memories of previous ideas and decisions about that food, such as it is a favorite, it is good, a heathy food, a fattening food, and even decisions by the viewer about the happiness consuming the food will generate.

You probably have a favorite food. Perhaps, you call it a comfort food.

Pause for a moment a picture one of your favorite foods in your mind. Image its taste, its scent and feel. Is it salty or sweet? Crisp, chewy, or soft – or a combination? Served hot, warm, room temperature or cold? Imagine that you are tasting this food right now. Give yourself enough time enjoying your food imagining, and then continue reading.

To create the previous food imagining you used your perceptual memories of experiences involving that food.

Conceptual artists aim to provoke thoughts and memories, by using the viewer’s visual perception. Word Art is a form of Conceptual Art. Word art is a form of Conceptual Art that uses words to provoke images and ideas.

Let’s do a visual memory changing art exercise using a Word art experience to inspire change in how you see the divine.

The word “divine”, D-i-V-i-N-E contains two i letters, which was specifically emphasized in the way it was just written. See them?

There is a kind of homonym type sound-alike between the name of the letter i and the word eye. When spoken their names match.

The play of sounds in English — eye and aye are pronounced the same — adds another level of positive or affirmative information.

Between those two ieyes is a letter V.  Thus: i V i

If we slightly raise the i letters to towards the top-of-the-line height and turn the i letters 45 degrees counterclockwise, we get:

Step 1

The letter V kind of looks like a cartoony, doodle, or emoji type nose.

 It looks even more like a simple depiction of a now if we move the dots of the turned 45 degrees i-eyes to below the center of them.  

The letter V kind of looks like a cartoony, doodle, or emoji type nose.

 It looks even more like a simple depiction of a now if we move the dots of the turned 45 degrees i-eyes to below the center of them.  

Step 2

When this new look becomes a Word Art image it looks like this:

DIVINE i’s by Judy Rey Wssserman

The Word Art that is shown about can be understood as portraying the Divine looking back at the viewer, at you.  The process of creating this Word Art is depicted on this blog so it is obvious that the Word “Devine” is shown. However, if the final artwork were appeared framed on a gallery wall, most viewers would readily recognize it as a unique portrayal of the word “Divine”.

In the process, or even merely by seeing the completed Word Art you have new and different experiences and visual memories of the word: Divine. A new layer of meaning has been added to the visual written word itself. You can see the word in a new, and hopefully for me, the artist, a inspiring way. Your perception of the reality of the word Divine has a new additional memory level of meaning. Visually perceiving in a new way is always life transforming.

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image.

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at Click: ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish.Click: https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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17th May 2016

Contrasts in Art and the Bible

Painting and drawing theory has much to do with contrasting darks and lights, shapes, etc. The Bible, which is an enduring delight of visual descriptions, begins by contrasting the new light to what was the deep but now with the creation of light is understood as darkness.

“There is no blue without yellow and without orange.” — Vincent Van Gogh

Vivid contrasts are revealed throughout the Bible. I begins with darkness on the face of the deep and proceeds to:

3 “And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness.”

The ideas of light and darkness continue throughout the Christian Testament too. In Luke 6:20, the poor receive the kingdom of heaven because in their need (for provision, health, comfort, etc.) their last hope rests on the Divine Love and creative power.  Stark contrast exists between extreme deep lack of the poor and the abundances of the Creator, the kingdom of all that is or ever will be. And yet, to begin to appreciate and experience that abundance, one must recognize one’s own lack.

“I form the light, and create darkness: I make peace, and create evil: I the LORD do all these things,” —Isaiah 45:7

Great artists reveal contrasts of light and darkness in their works, even in the most abstract art works. They have to do this as all that our eyes see are impressions of light. 

Rembrandt van Rijn is a master of especially bringing his subjects, especially in portraits out of the shadows. 

There are other thematic contrasts throughout scripture that artists portray, especially emotional ones. There is a profound tension that may be in-your-face as found in works by Vincent van Gogh, Rembrandt or Salvador Dali and celebrity portraits by Andy Warhol; or contrasting emotional tensions may be quietly alluded to, as found in works by Vermeer, Georgia O’Keeffe, Monet and Mark Rothko.  Leonardo Da Vinci splendidly shows so many contrasts, including that of emotional expression, in his Mona Lisa that it has become the most famous portrait in the world.

A great painter’s communication of emotional contrast/conflict the Divine is revealed and we also see or recognize truths about ourselves and our own lives. Although this reveal can pertain to the subject matter, for a great artist the contrast/conflict IS the subject matter.

Psalm 113 Essence Portrait by Vincent van Gogh by Judy Rey Wasserman

Psalm 113 (Vincent van Gogh) by Judy Rey Wasserman

I know this because powerful, brooding yet joyous works by Mark Rothko have brought me to to actual tears, as my emotional response was too great to contain when I felt confronted by own emotional conflicts and contrasts. Similarly, Vincent van Gogh’s The Cypresses in the Metropolitan Museum of art basically rescued me when I was a teen struggling with the emotional conflict warring inside me that swung from my youthful exuberant happiness, increasing autonomy and hope for the future, which radically conflicted with the sadness, fear and anger I felt in my home life. I recognized the same emotional strengths of conflict in van Gogh’s work, and across the centuries felt that someone else had felt as I did, somehow, I was not alone. Van Gogh found a way to show me a balance, even a harmony that could exist, and even exist for me.

For me, evil denotes the absence of G-D, whereas good shines with the Presence. Again, the contrast, and again, one that is a visual reference.

This post was inspired by the cited quote, which was posted by Peter Boaz Jones on his Facebook wall. The initial paragraph here was part of my comment and our discussion there. Peter also contributed the Isaiah 45:7 quote to an earlier draft of this post.  Follow Peter on Twitter where he is: @KlausClodt Thanks Peter!

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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08th Feb 2016

Polar Bear — an Essence Portrait

The new Polar Bear artwork, a basic Essence Portrait, is the first of a mini-series of bear portraits, which are created from strokes that are the letters from specific, and prophetic Bible texts.

This series was inspired by Daniel 7, where in chapter 5, we read in the King James Version : “And behold another beast, a second, like to a bear, and it raised up itself on one side, and it had three ribs in the mouth of it between the teeth of it: and they said thus unto it, Arise, devour much flesh.”

I intend to artistically, visually, explore what kind of a bear Daniel might have seen in his vision, as well as the symbolism of the bear in End Times, or pre-Messiah or Second Coming prophecy.

The symbol of the bear is used in other prophetic texts, including:

Isaiah 11:7’s “Also the cow and the bear will graze, Their young will lie down together, And the lion will eat straw like the ox.”

Isaiah 59:11’s “All of us growl like bears, And moan sadly like doves; We hope for justice, but there is none, For salvation, but it is far from us.”

And often overlooked in prophecy, but relevant and prophetic, from Proverbs 28:15 –
“Like a roaring lion and a rushing bear Is a wicked ruler over a poor people.”

In 1 Samuel 17:32-37, David as shepherd boy explains his potential ability to defeat the giant Goliath stems from learning to defeat both lions and bears, when he was protecting his flock. Thus the bear, symbolizes what is large, even immense, a giant like Goliath.

Future blogs on upcoming bear Essence Portraits will continue the exploration of the bear prophecies begun here.

polar bear by Judy Rey Wasserman

The strokes that create the Polar Bear Essence Portrait are the original Torah font letters from the words of these texts: Daniel 7:5, 2 Kings 2:24, Proverbs 28:15, Isaiah 11:7, 2 Samuel 17:8, Proverbs 17:12, and 1 Samuel 17:32-37.  [Note: Since I only use original Torah font letters as my strokes, no texts from the Christian Testament are used here. Although Revelations was written by a Jew who was an early follower of Yeshua (Jesus), earliest versions found to date of Revelations are in Greek; thus I do not have an original Hebrew text to use for my strokes.]

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Judy Rey’s adult coloring book featuring psalms will be published in 2021.

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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31st Oct 2014

How are Bitcoin, the Bible & Art Related?

Any image of a crypto currency coin is a fantasy, even if it is a logo, since crypto currencies do not exist in real coin form. That is intrinsic to crypto currencies. Basically they can be understood as digital mathematical equations that have been solved and exist on a blockchain, which is also found only via the Internet.  Bitcoins and other crypto currencies are conceptual money.

The artwork shown here (below) is my Essence Portrait (basic image) of a Bitcoin.  It is a part of my In God We Trust art series, and its new Money Project.

Fiat currencies, those issued by a government have always had a physical form. Usually the artwork shown on a coin or bill has political relevance and reinforced the ideas of the country’s culture.  Fiat currencies that you may know or use are called:  dollars, Euros, British sterling, yen, pesos, marks and shekels, etc.  These forms of currency used to be backed by gold or silver, but none are backed by anything other than their governments strength and credit today.

Since neither fiat currencies nor crypto currencies are backed by any precious metal or other commodity, it is very simple to transfer their value between companies and individuals electronically and digitally. For example when you use a debit card to make a purchase the numerical value of that purchase is subtracted from your account and added to the accounts of the merchant and processing company. Actual paper or coin money is not actually physically transferred from your bank to the bank and merchant’s account.

 History and movies are filled with true and fictional accounts of train and armored car robberies that occurred as money or the precious gold or silver that backed it were moved in and out of banks.  Today’s bank robbers are hackers who rob digital databases for account information that they use to transfer funds to their own accounts. Both fiat and crypto currencies have endured these attacks.

In a way crypto currencies are safer than fiat currencies as a robber cannot rob digital wallets at gunpoint because physically there is no way to collect their loot. Armed robbers can and still do rob stores and banks and get away with currency bills and coins. Art robberies are also continue, but frankly, I cannot recall any art armed robberies.

Ironically, as art my image of a Bitcoin has value when it becomes a limited edition signed print or painting, which could be paid for online through my shopping card with a debit card,or handed to me in cash or sent  inbitcoin (or fractional amount). This image will be used in artwork that is available as perks and bonuses to reward levels in my upcoming Indiegogo campaign.

In addition to its value as art, this artwork is created following the tenets of Post Conceptual art’s UnGraven Image theory. Each and every stroke that makes up this image is a letter, a Torah font letter taken from specific Bible texts that relate to the image.

Bitcoin (Essence Portrait) by Judy Rey Wasserman

These letters also are symbols that also elegantly reference strings of elementary physics, which are the basis of the physical universe. Thus the strokes present an extra level of information that is additional to the image, adding additional and intrinsic informational value.

Bitcoin as a currency that is based on information called bits. These bits of information are binary. Likewise Torah font Hebrew is a binary font – the only alpha numeric binary font in any language. Thus each letter can be written using combinations of two letters, a yud and a vav, and also it is binary as each letter can be written by simply making one or two strokes. Thus, as strokes for any crypto currency, using the Torah font closely relates to digitized information.

Bitcoin as the most popular and prominent crypto currency is making strides forward, and then backwards, and then forward again to find acceptance and legitimacy with federal, state and foreign governments. Its proponents say that it will help the unbanked, which means poor people, both in industrialized and emerging nations. Of course helping the poor, fair weights and measures and equal opportunities are all found in the Bible, in the Torah(Pentateuch) and those ideas as principles and laws originated there, out in the Sinai desert as the Israelites fled Egypt, and have been carried forward by Jews and then Christians ever since.  Fiat currencies also have an inherent equality without regard to persons insofar as a dollar held by a poor person is worth as much as one held by someone wealth, but this is generally true for most valuable items and commodities, as well as all crypto currencies.

I have also noted that Bitcoin is making its best strides forward primarily in countries where the Bible is welcomed or at least legal to own and discuss openly.  This toleration includes countries that are not thought of as having either many Jews or
Christians, like Japan. It may just be a coincidence, but it is interesting to note.

However, as fine art my images of bitcoins (much more to be revealed over time and in the Indiegogo campaign) can legally physically go and be sold in countries that do not accept Bitcoin as of this writing such as Russia, or are difficult places to own a Bible because art easily crosses borders and barriers.

Close up of strokes of Judy Rey Wasserman's Bitcoin Essence Portrait\

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. ungravenimage.com.
Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

 

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11th Sep 2014

Predicting the Future of Fine Art

The future of fine art is easy to predict in broad terms.

Art’s future is predictable because it continues to repeat its history – only in new configurations that use and stimulate the science, technology, and social insights of its current times.

Yet the artists who are creating the future of art can be difficult to recognize and invest in collecting their works. It is scientifically difficult to literally see, and then recognize what is truly revolutionary and new in its own time.

Few people have the ability (brains) that allow them to be early adopters in any field. This is because we perceive (including see) see through our memories. Our brains are wired to perceive what is familiar – not new and unfamiliar. That needs to be learned.

When something radically new is presented to us it is difficult and uncomfortable for us to perceive it. Early adopters seem to enjoy this level of discomfort, their experiences with perceiving what is new have been positive (perhaps and especially as young children), so they naturally reach out for the unknown idea or item.

This kind of adoption is different from that of the majority who are eager to own the latest tech gadget that is really at best an improvement of previous gadgets that were generally accepted. Such a gadget is not actually radically new. Therefore tablets, which are just a new form of PC, caught on quickly. They are basically smaller laptops or bigger PC-based phones. The original technology that was radically new and climbed the mountain to gain acceptance was the idea of PCs and then that they could be linked through the something we now call the Internet.

In fine art this tends to make artists, even contemporary artists who are making works much like the artists of a previous generation acceptable. Contemporary artists whose works resemble Picasso type abstractions, Abstract Expressionism, and Pop Art are acceptable but appear to be new because they use new materials or have some twist. These works are not revolutionary, just new twists on what was previously revolutionary. These artists and their works are discovered by the art world “cognoscenti” and accepted into a blue-chip gallery fold. It is as if the fact that a work has sold for a high price somehow makes it radical, even revolutionary. Yet, art history shows that many works by now almost forgotten establishment artists sold for high prices in their day.

Currently once actually radical Conceptual art and artists like Lawrence Weiner are now also accepted. Now that these works are accepted, they are not actually currently radically new, but they were radical and pioneering until enough (a tipping point) of had enough encounters with them so they could readily be seen and understood.

Ironically, this ready acceptance of artists who are new with a slight twist but not really revolutionary is also predictable and a part of art’s history.

In fine art the past exists to give us shoulders to stand on so we can see and direct a path to the future. Art (I mean great art) is ALWAYS revolutionary, which implies a lack of nostalgia — just ask Gauguin and probably the other artists who overturned the established norm of their time.

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. ungravenimage.com.
Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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11th Jul 2014

How Did I Miss Pissarro’s Birthday?!

Happy Belated Birthday to Camille Pissarro!

Since Pissarro is one of the most influential artists in my life, and also since his birthday falls only two days prior to my own, I am woefully embarrassed to admit that yesterday I forgot to make his yearly birthday tweet. In my meager defense I can only point out that yesterday I was woefully sleep deprived (you should only see the remains of the poor candle I burned at both ends!). I nodded off early (calling it a nap) and awoke surprised to see that the sun had risen. So, for the first time since a few years ago when I ended up spending the night in an emergency ward room due to an accident, I even failed to tweet out my daily sign-off message (blessing).

Camille Pissarro was born on July 10, 1830, in what is now the US Virgin Islands, which were then in the Dutch West Indies.

Almost every Modern and Contemporary artist owes him a great debt of thanks, from the Impressionists right up to my theory of Post Contemporary art.

Pissarro helped create and keep together the group of artists that became known as the Impressionists and personally also influenced the Post Impressionists, the Neo-Impressionists and the Pointillists. The artists who turned to him for his artistic advice (wisdom!), encouragement and friendship included, but are not limited to: Claude Monet, Édouard Manet , Armand Guillaumin, EdgarDegas, Mary Cassatt, Vincent van Gogh, Paul Cezanne, Georges Seurat, and Paul Gauguin.

Influenced by both science and religious concepts the Impressionists sought to portray the light. Pissarro was also a revolutionary in that he portrayed the common man (a theme later taken up by van Gogh) more that the then also revolutionary focus on the emerging middle class (favored by Manet, Monet, Degas and Renoir), instead of the wealthy and renowned.

As a founder and leader of Impressionism, Pissarro, as a founder of Impressionism could have continued down that path once his work was esteemed, which is what artists normally do once their work becomes accepted. Instead, Pissarro courageously veered off to focus on new, more radical ideas, joining with the Neo-Impressionists. Thus, Pissarro is the only artist to have shown his work at all eight Paris Impressionist exhibitions, and also in all four of the major Post-Impressionists exhibits, alongside the works of Georges Seurat, Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh and Paul Gauguin.

The ideas and movements of Modern and now Contemporary art all stem from and build upon the ideas of Pissarro and the Post Impressionists he mentored and influenced.

When I began my experiment by painting the first work of what was to become Post Conceptual Art theory, I was actually thinking about Pissarro. I knew that what I was doing was revolutionary, as revolutionary as focusing upon the light and not the flora, fauna, architecture or person(s) that the light was falling upon to reveal. In my the e book, In the Beginning, I tell the story of that first experiment and even include my Post Conceptual and UnGraven Image art portrait of Camille Pissarro, which points to and even cements his influence on art even to our day.

Camille Pissarro by Judy Rey Wasserman Strokes: Psalm 27, Psalm 119:105, Ecclesiastes 2:13, Psalm36:10, Isaiah 60:1

Camille Pissarro by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes: Psalm 27, Psalm 119:105, Ecclesiastes 2:13, Psalm36:10, Isaiah 60:1.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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10th Jul 2014

Is Art for Everyone Now?

In a way, art has always been for everyone, from the cave paintings until today. It is often shown in public spaces so that everyone in the community can view it.

Yet there continues to be a sense that art is not really for everyone as only wealthy and powerful individuals or companies, or government or religious institutions can afford to collect the best known and revered art. There is a question and ongoing debate that asks: If art is for everyone, shouldn’t everyone be able to own art?

People from all classes feel that they own music, literature and films. Certainly the music and film and video industries have and are experiencing upheaval in how they are distributed so that more people can see and “own” digital reproductions of works. The publishing industry is currently also experiencing an upheaval as e books and readers grow in popularity, and authors self-publish, by-passing the publishing paradigm of the past century.

Fine art, especially two dimensional original works on paper or canvas and three dimensional sculpture is experiencing some change of method (like 3-D printing) and materials (like original digital prints). Art fairs may be somewhat changing sales and distribution, but generally the same galleries represent the artists only they set up small temporary galleries at the fairs. The paradigm for collecting art has not radically changed the way it has for buying books and obtaining soundtracks or videos.

That people other than a religious institution, the very wealthy or the government can own art is a modern idea. The idea is spreading thanks to the events of the Twentieth Century that show middle class people finding and buying art from artists who later become blue chip artists, making these early collectors wealthy.

In reality, keeping an artwork, like a painting in a good environment for its preservation, insuring it, correct framing, etc., is costly, but not out of reach for the solidly middle class. One well known middle class collector couple was Herb and Dorothy Vogel. The Vogels had little space in their one bedroom apartment as so much was relegated to the storage of their art collection. The Vogels had no children and lived frugally on only one of their salaries so that they could afford to collect art. Yet, they were not serious investors. They were serious art collectors who collected only works that they appreciated. They enjoyed meeting artists, going to their studios and discovering emerging art. Plus, at the time that they were collecting, prior to the Internet, they had an advantage: the Vogels lived in NYC. Eventually they gave their collection away, primarily to the National Gallery of Art, in Washington, D.C.

As collectors the Vogels were an exception. Although the Impressionists turned their attention to the middle classes, and even the peasants, original art was and is predominantly collected by people who are very wealthy and at a lower price point, such as for limited edition prints, by the upper middle class.

Until very recently having great (blue chip) art in one’s home meant buying so-so art reproductive prints or beautiful and expensive coffee table art books. Now anyone in the world with an Internet connection can easily access much of the greatest art in the world as most major museums and many galleries show their art on their websites and apps. Yet the art itself remains where it is and owned by others.

Digital print technology continues to improve, and is so good that original prints are referred to and sold as paintings by fine art galleries for thousands and tens of thousands of dollars. This same technology is applied to reproductions of works by well-known artists whose museum shows are blockbusters, such as Van Gogh, Picasso and Warhol. While the original is always best, new quality digital reproductions on paper or canvas have been mistaken for an original at first glance.

Historically, the community has always owned its art to a great extent, from the cave paintings to the street art of Banksy. The “true” owners were often the religious establishments, the rulers and the very wealthy, but showing off the art has always been popular.

Our communities are expanding thanks to the Internet, which is shifting our experience of distance and time as we quickly connect with those on other continents. A growing and interconnected community of artists, curators, collectors, art writers and historians, museum directors, dealers and enthusiasts (in no special order here) are connecting through social media. The walls where we display art are no longer just in our studios, homes, offices, galleries or museums, but also on out Facebook walls, in our Twitter streams, pinned on Pinterest, shared on Instagram and on blogs like this one.

This means that someone who lives far from the cities that attract artists, especially emerging artists, can discover the potentially next blue chip artists through social media, by reading posts, tweets and blogs and looking at the jpgs of their art that they post. A visit to an artist’s Facebook wall can be a bit like visiting with an artist in her studio and often there is a link to the artist’s blog where more images and ideas are posted.

If the Internet and social media had existed for Vincent van Gogh or Monet, given his literary letter writing skills he probably would have had a blog, definitely joined the art discussions on Facebook, and images of his work would have reached a wide audience in his lifetime. Would an Internet version of the Vogels who were looking to collect emerging artists have discovered him? So far this kind of discovery of a new artist who becomes recognized as a blue chip artist has not occurred, but it will happen.

vanGoghPsalm113BW

Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) by Judy Rey Wasserman, Strokes: Original letters of the words of Psalm 113

The future looks exciting as technologies continue to develop that will inevitably disrupt the making and distribution of art in ways that before the Internet we never could have imagined.

This article began as a comment to a Facebook wall post: “Carter Cleveland Says Art in the Future Will Be for Everyone -The Artsy Founder Writes That the Internet Holds the Promise of a World Where Art Is as Ubiquitous as Music Is Today” (WSJ) http://online.wsj.com/articles/carter-cleveland-says-art-in-the-future-will-be-for-everyone-1404762157

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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19th May 2014

Art for Successful Brand Promotion

Visual art sells.

It not only sells itself, it sells and promotes what it is associated with – including governments, products and individual identity.

Brand recognition not only associated thorough the through visual recognition of the product(s), logo and packaging. Marketing professionals know the benefit of endorsements and advertising that associate the product with celebrities, authorities. Testimonials and word of mouth recommendations from people we at least assume to be like ourselves continues to sell products.

Successful job applicants and romantic suitors, business marketers and governments all know the value of artistic presentation of their products. Every one is promoting him or herself in some way to others most of the time.

According to ScienceDaily.com, a study by the University of Georgia found that when a product is visually aligned with art, even if the exposure is momentary, consumers are more receptive to the product itself. Common items, such as cutlery and a soap dispenser were displayed along with fine art that ranged from van Gogh’s Café Terrace at Night to other work by a relatively unknown artist.

According to one of the study’s two authors, Henrik Hagtvedt assistant professor at the UGA Terry College of Business, “Visual art has historically been used as a tool for persuasion. It has been used to sell everything from religion to politics to spaghetti sauce to the artist’s image. It’s about time we develop a scientific basis to understand how it actually works.

Once the new nation and government of the 23 United States of America had its founding written mission statement documents it went immediately into the art business. How? It issued money. Most of the world’s money is a form of art. Take a coin or bill and look at it. See all the decorations – portraits, symbols, decorations?

Governments have been issuing art as or on (depends on one’s view) money since ancient times. Usually the art depicted has meaning for the government that can increase its power or prestige. Alexander the Great put his own image on coins to promote himself and his empire. Every time money changes hands it promotes, via its images, the ideas of its country of origin.

Plus of course, governments, religious organizations and corporations commission impressive architecture (as opposed to purely utilitarian), portraits of their leaders and encourage artists to paint or sculpt images of
their triumphs, landmarks and products.

Wealth can easily be transferred and issued without art on it. Legal contracts, bank checks, stock certificates, and even plain security personal or business checks can do the job. There was a time when coins
were pure metals, especially gold and silver and were actually worth the weight of the metal – yet governments applied artistic images as a form of powerful advertisement.

In a way we are all in the art business since we are all creating a visual identity that we “sell” to others. That visual identity includes our personal appearance, as well as that of our homes and places of work. The art we display on our walls or surfaces (sculpture) is a key promoter of our values and purposes to family, friends and clients.

Corporations successfully use art to create their image and promote their mission. Of course, they have logos, well designed packaging, advertisements, etc., but most of the top corporations display good to excellent art in their corporate offices and even lend art to museums (and at the very least next to that loan there will be a small wall tag citing the generosity of the corporation). Most corporations choose the works they show and collect carefully, not only because fine art is an investment, but because they understand that the art depicts their taste and hence, corporate culture.

ArtReview  magazine has a yearly list of the 100 most important people in the contemporary art world. In the past a dentist in Great Britain has made the list as a collector. He began his collection by trading services for fine art of up and coming artists. Not only did his known net worth rise considerably when several of these artists became such as Damien Hirst, prominent,. The dentist’s patients see him as a man who is up to date, if not ahead of his time. Good branding for a man in a medical field!

In a similar way, two of my three recent dentists involved with a root canal have unsigned mass produced prints of pretty landscape scenes, usually involving a body or water or flowers or both, but all clearly at best
décor store quality. These prints are supposed to inspire a kind of cozy comfort, however what they say about these professionals is that they have not put thought and any real expense into their businesses, but are, at best simply run of the mill. The third dentist was an oral surgeon who was necessary due to a mistake or accident by one of the other two. I have recommended his work to others as his work was better and less painful and his care and staff were excellent. This oral surgeon actually had some interesting original, signed and numbered prints in his reception area, hall and offices. One of the crowns from the third dentist broke while the other is too tight. As I seek a new regular dentist I will be visiting their offices, without any appointment to check out the art they have on their walls!

The original, signed and numbered prints on the walls of the oral surgeon were not expensive works, but they were quality contemporary works, not trite and simplistic created for mass production. They promoted his brand. He was up to date and quality.

Growing up in Manhattan, there were two Chinese restaurants that were across the street from each other, and they served our whole non-Chinese neighborhood. They both had just about the same menu and pricing
including cocktails and liquor, crisp white table cloths, good service, wallpaper and tropical fish swimming in large tanks, plus they were open the same hours. The smaller one had slightly better food and service, so they did a better take-out business. The larger one had an exciting museum quality huge painting of junks on the sea in old Hong Kong by a respected Chinese artist. People would stop into the restaurant just to see this painting.

The larger restaurant was always crowded on weekends and evenings. Business people would fill it during lunch hours, coming from all parts of the city to dine near the painting. When another Chinese restaurant opened a few blocks away with different dishes the smaller one succumbed to the competition, while the one that had the painting remained just as popular. Their art differentiated them and pulled them ahead of their
competitors.

However stylish a home or place of business may be, it promotes its mission and values through the art it displays. Art is not a decoration. It inspires, it promotes, it challenges and it intimately shares a vision. Wise and successful people use the art they display to promote their values and missions, which is what a brand is.

”Art has connotations of excellence, luxury and sophistication that spill over onto products with which the art is associated,” said Vanessa M. Patrick, an artist who is the other author of the study at UGA. “We
call this the ‘art infusion effect.’ It does not stem from the content of the artwork, that is, what is depicted in the artwork, but from general connotations of art itself …and it [art] stands out, even with all the stimuli competing for attention in contemporary society.”

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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28th Mar 2014

What Makes Art Great?

Great Art is about showing what we cannot see, or did not see — and as such it is inspirational.

Great Art is also one of the most intimate forms of communication possible between two human beings, the artist and the viewer, as the viewer is able to see through the artist’s eyes.

As such, great art sells tickets – it is good box office. People want to see what the have not seen before or expand their vision of the world, plus we all crave honest intimacy.

Van Gogh showed human emotion where it usually does not seem to exist: in landscapes. We can see the world as van Gogh saw it and his work is personal, intimate and honest.

The ability to connect and share a personal vision that encompasses more that what we can normally see seems to be a hallmark or constant for great artists and art.

For instance, Cubism showed the other, unseen sides of a person or thing all at once. Only Superman, a fictional non-human has X-ray vision – the power to see beyond the front to the back. Yet Picasso, not only showed how to see in the-all-at-once way, he created intimate portraits of the women he loved and we can see them all-at-once thorough his works.

Physically, we can never fully see reality only with our eyes, even when corrected through scientific intervention, such as laser surgery, eyeglasses, telescopes or microscopes. For example, we can see the photographic pattern X-rays make, but our eyes cannot see x-rays, although they are there and therefore possible to physically perceive by a life form.

The range of colors that we see is really very limited. We know that other color vibrations, such as infrared, exist that we cannot see.

We cannot see atoms, and although experiments seem to prove their existence science continues to search for ways to more accurately show or prove their existence and that of particles.

However, what cannot be seen can be shown. It can be shown by illustrators and artists. Both create a physical visual representation of something. The difference is that the work of the artist is inspirational and intimate.

We cannot see the unconscious, but various Abstract Expressionists and Surrealists gave us impressions of it.

The shaman artists who painted in the caves, showed the visions that they saw in trances through their art. People were able to see other realities as if they saw through the eyes of their shaman.

Artists today are exploring ways of showing the scientific and spiritual unseen in nanoart, fractal art, UnGraven Image as well as continuing to evoke ideas with Conceptual and Word Art. The artists who will continue to be considered great will not only show these new realities, but do so in a way that is inspiring and intimate.

Great art inspires new ways of seeing ourselves and our world. It reaches beyond its historical context to communicate in the present. Hence, we are moved by Rembrandt, Da Vinci, Monet and other artists from different times than our own.

Marcel Duchamp put a urinal on display, entitled it “Fountain” and signed his work, R. Mutt he was fulfilling the role of the shaman-artist in a new way. Duchamp was daring us to see reality and art in a new way, making the heretofore profane holy as what is more profane than a urinal or more holy than art? The word “fountain” evokes metaphorical and mythological connotations of life and youth giving waters, plus references again religion as the work was first shown in France, a Catholic country where the churches all had fonts of holy water.

Since great art is personal and intimate it has to be honest and express the truth of the artist. Remember seeing a painting that was all blue of various shades. The artist had written that on the day when the painting was made he felt sad, blue, so to express himself he made this painting. It did express the artist’s feelings but it did not have a vision to communicate to the viewer. It was as intimate and honest as a child crying who wants her way, but it was not inspiring, only sad and common.

So a hallmark of great art is that it inspires the viewer to see the world in a new, unique way. The artist has something to communicate and manages to communicate it intimately.

A few years ago there was a show of van Gogh’s work at the Metropolitan Museum of art and I went on a cold and story winter day. The museum was packed it people and there was a waiting time of at least 45 minutes, with a line that snakes through floors and galleries on two levels. So, I decided to see some other work first. I found an interesting and free docent lecture about the Hudson River School with fewer than thirty other participants. I meandered through many uncrowded galleries and shows. As usual people were crowed in around the Met’s Monets and the Rembrandts, Cezanne, etc. There was no waiting at all at the galleries for the other special shows, all for renowned and critically acclaimed artists. Those shows were fairly empty and people moved along. When it became obvious the line was only growing longer, I joined it. There I overheard and chatted with strangers, many of whom had traveled into the city just to view this show, including teenagers on their own without an assignment, while others were returning for another viewing. The line was noisy but once we were allowed into full packed of rooms people spoke to each other in hushed voices if at all, except for the museum staff who occasionally shouted a plea with the viewers to move along, because many people, including me, would just stand before a work and just look and look.

It is almost kind of kinky to realize that there were whole roomfuls of people simultaneously having a personal, intimate experience with Vincent van Gogh, through his art.

Great art sells tickets, lots of tickets to blockbuster museum and even gallery shows – because people not only come, but then come again and again to be inspired and experience the intimacy of visual communication.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

<p>Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s <a href=”https://artofseeingthedivine.com”>Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. </a> You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. <a href=”https://artofseeingthedivine.com”>https://artofseeingthedivine.com</a></p>.

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