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Archive for the 'Art Theory & Show Reviews' Category

15th Jan 2014

Name the Painting

What if an artist would name a painting after you?  As the art lived on. passing from one generation to another, or to other collectors, you would be remembered.

Or what if you wanted to give someone special a unique gift of a painting named after them?

For instance, the postcard sized study for a Genesis Sunset could be entitled, Genesis Sunset Study for (Insert your name)___________.  Further, if a large painting results from this study then that painting would also be entitled Genesis Sunset for (Insert your name)___________.

While this kind of naming is common for paintings of things that are commissioned. For instance, John Doe commissions an artist to create a portrait of his house (or mansion), then the painting might be entitled, John Doe’s House.

However for artworks that are not portraits or commissions, it is rare for the title to include a name of anyone, except perhaps a family member or friend of the artist.

In preparing to blog for the postcard sized Genesis Sunset show here, I needed a name. Since it is a new year, I thought I would once again entitle a sunset using the year and a letter from the Hebrew alphabet.  However, there are only twenty two Hebrew letters, and this year because I am preparing many small works as rewards for my Crowd Funding campaign that begins after Passover and Easter to fund a full sized book, and also because the images used for the book are page5 sized, also small, because the strokes in my regular sized and large paintings when reduced to a book page sized photographic image.  So, for the smaller free e book that will be given away prior and possibly during the campaign to introduce a book that is very different from any book about art, or inspiration, plus, for rewards for the crowd funding campaign, I am going to need to name many new images, especially of sunsets and these first books start with Genesis 1 and the theology that UnGraven Image Art theory depicts via symbol-strokes.

So it dawned on me that an interesting solution would be to use option to have a painting, especially a sunset, named for one’s self or a loved one, especially as rewards for the Crowd Funding campaign.

This especially works for me, as I enjoy finding ways for others to participate or interact in my art, especially for shows. This naming idea includes the collector’s participation in the naming process itself.

Instead of the usual “(Untitled)’ one sees in captions for artist’s works, I am calling these Crowd Funding Rewards “Genesis Sunset to be Titled by Collector”.  Since this is the first, to distinguish, it is #1.

Genesis Sunset postcard 2014 by Judy Rey Wasserman

(Genesis Sunset) to be Titled by Collector #1 2014) by Judy Rey Wasserman

Strokes: Genesis 1-2:7 (in Torah font Hebrew)

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Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting -edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true?  See more in these blogs and at our websites and blogs at ungravenimage.com & ungravenimage.com/blog & artofseeingthedivine.com . See more. Live inspired.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

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08th Nov 2013

Monarch Butterfly Essence Portrait (Psalm 145- Hallel)

The Monarch Butterfly Essence Portrait below will shortly be printed out own my Giclee printer and then painted upon, creating a new painting. Depending on the result, I may then scan that painting and create a new reproductive print to sell in my online store and shopping cart artofseeingthedivine.com .

An Essence Portrait is a basic black and white image representing a person, flora or fauna member(s), or a thing, like a lit candle.

My Essence portraits always begin and exist as images that use ink and/or acrylic paint on paper or canvas. The originals are always small enough so that they can be scanned on my professional art scanner.

My Essence Portraits are used by me to make reproductive Giclee prints, tradigital prints and original digital prints and original paintings.

The Monarch Butterfly Essence Portrait below will shortly be printed out own my Giclee printer and then painted upon, creating a new painting. Depending on the result, I may then scan that painting and create a new reproductive print to sell in my online store and shopping cart at events or use as a limited reward on my Crowd Funding campaign for a full sized new book that is scheduled to launch this spring, right after the Passover 2014 blood moon and Easter, and then continue until Shavout/Pentecost.

Previously I posted a colorful small postcard study Psalm 145 (Monarch Butterfly Study) that used the same Monarch Butterfly model, but did not use this Essence Portrait, although, of course, like the real butterflies, had a kind of black outline and body. If you compare the black areas you will see differences.

One of the things I especially appreciate about many butterfly species is how they kind of look like little flying pieces of amazingly fragile stained glass. Like stained glass art, their features are all outlined, usually in a dark color.

The Monarch Buitterfly below is created using strokes that are the original Hebrew letters (Torah font) or Psalm 145, also known as Hallel, a song and prayer of praise.

Keep watching this blog and following my links to my blogs posted on Facebook and Twitter for more updates on upcoming butterfly images, including new butterflies and variations on this one.

 Monarch Butterfly Essence Portrait (Psalm 145 - Hallel)

Monarch Butterfly Essence Portrait (Psalm 145- Hallel) by Judy Rey
Wasserman

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more.

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29th Oct 2013

Banksy’s Place in NYC October 2013

Banksy is on the verge of completing a self-proclaimed artist residency in New York City, in which, every day he has added (donated) a work of art to the city and its people in some way, during October, 2013. Banksy has placed himself and his art in the city at the anniversary of Super Storm Sandy. Many of the works that he had presented during his residency have appeared in areas hit hardest by the storm, although this is neither stated by Banksy or commented upon in the press.

For his residency, Banksy has received almost no direct monetary gain. However he (I have the info that Banksy is a man from a good source) has received what seems to me to be more press than and other Contemporary artist has ever gained for one show – and “normal” gallery shows last for a month.

However, what inspired me to write this blog is not directly Banksy, but an article published yesterday, along with auxiliary articles and posts, including on Jerry Saltz’s Facebook page, which has become The social media meeting place for artists, and those who care about Contemporary art.

Yesterday, Bloomberg News (founded and mainly owned by Mayor Bloomberg) posted an article If Wall Street Worked Like the Art Market, It Would Be a Crime by Mark Gimein , a piece aimed at examining the art world’s gallery system. The article goes into how the bigger galleries both protect and control the careers of their artists, the collectors who can collect the artists, and control the price of the art. This is especially seen to benefit younger artists via buy-back dealers’ contracts that help prevent the works from an undesirable auction sale and price. However, the young Chinese artists, whose works go directly to auction, which is the custom in China, seem to fare well. Gimein asks for an artist, or artists who will forge a path outside of the gallery system.

Back to Banksy, who is not represented by a primary gallery. Banksy successfully (and successfully monetarily) forges his own path. Banksy decides where and even how his works will be shown. So before anyone much knew who he was he had his works hanging in museums, such as NYC’s Metropolitan and Museum of Modern Art. Why? Because Banksy pranked them and hung his own works there, promoting himself and the museums, with his prank (while forfeiting his art).

Banksy’s art is not just about what is depicted or performed. It is about where it is viewed. In his ongoing use of site (pun intended) he joins with other Street Artists, such as the “grandfather “of Street Art, Blek le Rat (Xavier Prou), but no one has used place as well as Banksy since the Impressionists moved to painting outdoors. For me, to discuss or comment on a Banksy without mentioning place, whether a specific geographic spot where a work is first seen to the original support of the paint (such as a living, unharmed elephant), would be to miss part of the point of the work.

To date, I can find no article blog or even lengthy comment that points to and explores the ongoing and incredible use of sites and neighborhoods where the works of BanksyNY have appeared. Re-examine each of the images within the context of the places where they have appeared. For instance, The forlorn suitor left waiting outside Larry Flint’s strip club; the pile of rubble statue of the one of the world’s oldest and enduring artworks, the Sphinx, which was found in a seemingly deserted Queens lot, and then sold and dismantled within the day; and the images and word art found in neighborhoods that are—putting it in politically correct terns – not posh. [ Please feel free to leave a comment and link to any blog or article to prove thus statement as incorrect, as my life’s work and passion deals with making art and sharing inspiration, not in proving that I am some kind of sharp investigative journalist.]

When I began this piece I commented that Banksy has received almost no remuneration from his October 2-12 show in NYC. The remuneration officially received came from a stand selling “spray art” at Central Park . The total take for the day was $420.00 according to BanksyNY’s In Better Out than In website (where you can see all the works of the show). Today, a street vendor was spotted and originally tweeted by @pagesixemily, from the New York Post’s Page Six at noontime. Her tweet:”Latest Banksy rip off. Chap in Soho selling “I am Banksy” t-shirts. Says he’s made $500.00 so far today pic.twitter.com/xxPwSp8nHt. “This means that a tee-shirt that sells for $20.00 can make more money that real art by a known artist when the artist’s name is mentioned on the shirt, but not on the street stand selling the art. That is both poignant and witty — two hallmarks I usually find in Banksy’s works. Could this tee-shirt seller actually be today’s Banksy performance art? As I write this it seems to me to be a possibility as when I look closely at the photo on a large monitor it seems to me that the black letters are sprayed on, not screen-printed. This, plus the fact that there still is no comment from Banlsy regarding his above mentioned website re today’s work. We shall discover the truth of this after this blog is posted, yet either way a point about selling art, or how we see what we think we see more that what actually is, has been made.

Mayor Bloomberg (who I basically like as he has done some good things for the city I was born in, raised in and love,such as basically freeing it from second hand smoke in public places) proclaimed vehemently that he and the NYPD have no tolerance for vandalism, and that includes Banksy’s current residency. According to the press, and as headlined in the NY Daily News (posted on the BanksyNY website), the hunt is on for Banksy. How sad for the city that is benefitting with added tourism, spending, and a sense of adventure, fun and well, fine art and discussions about art, including the gallery role in promoting art, all thanks to Banksy’s residency.

“First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win.” -Mahatma Gandhi

Finally, let’s move back to the concept of place. Fine art almost always involves some kind of property rights, because whether painted in a canvas or wall or placed on a private lawn or in a public place, it takes up space. Place leads to questions of ownership and rights –ideas that can often lead to usurpation of others’ rights, and wars or real criminality by those who appear to be in power, including crimes against humanity. And we come full circle back to one on Banksy’s most enduring themes: peace – and peace through non-violent artistic protest, and peace always involves place, or places.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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19th Jul 2013

DETROIT FILES FOR THE LARGEST MUNICIPAL INSOLVENCY EVER

Todd Levin, an estemed art advisor and curator,posted the article below on his Facebook wall, but since the majority of the text was contained in his comment that followed, simply sharing it on Facebook would fail to share most of his post. Although I, Judy Rey Wasserman, hail from Manhattan, I am an American, and Detroit is a special American city, with problems that I believe we, as a country need to face and find solutions for, including preserving the city’s great art museum.  The blog post below is shared here with courtesy of Todd Levin.

DETROIT FILES FOR THE LARGEST MUNICIPAL INSOLVENCY IN THE HISTORY OF HISTORY

The city’s flag acknowledges as much – SPERAMUS  MELIORA; RESURGET  CINERIBUS: “We hope for better things; it shall rise from the ashes.”

City of Detroit, Michigan Flag

No one cared much about Detroit until the Dow collapsed in 2008. But now, Detroit can no longer simply be ignored. Detroit has become epic, symbolic, historic – hip, even. Detroit is the birthplace of mass production, the automobile, the cement road, and credit on a mass scale. America’s way of life was built here. Detroit was called the “Arsenal of Democracy” in the 1940’s. And now, it is the unemployment capital,
where half the population does not work a consistent job. For those lucky enough
to get a job, a newly hired auto worker earns $14 an hour. This, adjusted for
inflation, is thee cents less than what Henry Ford was paying in 1914 when he
announced the $5 day. Detroit, which once led the nation in home ownership, is now a foreclosure capital. Once the nation’s richest large city, Detroit is now its
poorest.

Detroit was born in July 1701. In the 19th Century the city was the center of the nation’s carriage and wheel and stove industries. Henry Ford, a farmer, built his first automobile plant in Highland Park in 1899. General Motors was founded in 1909. In 1919, the young and hungry men of GM devised an ingenious scheme to supplant Ford as the number one car producer in the world – credit. A century after its founding, in 2009 GM had more than $1 trillion loaned to car buyers and had expanded in to other businesses like home mortgages. On July 1, 2009, General Motors declared bankruptcy, following Chrysler, which had done so a month earlier. On July 18, 2013, Detroit filed for the largest municipal bankruptcy in the history of history. The car made Detroit and the car unmade Detroit.

Since its founding, Detroit has been a place of perpetual flames. Three times the city has suffered race riots and three times the city has burned to the ground. The city’s flag acknowledges as much – “Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus”: We hope for better things; it shall rise from the ashes.

Detroit was first burned in 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, when a ten year old white girl accused a swarthy-skinned tavern owner named William Faulkner of rape. That was enough for the white mob that went berserk after his conviction, putting an axe in one man’s skull and burning down 35 buildings. Federal troops had to be called in.

Detroit burned again in the race riots of 1943, during World War II, after a group of white teenagers got into a brawl with a group of black teens. A rumor of a white girl being raped by a gang of blacks fueled a mob. People were pulled from cars and beaten; the black part of town was set on fire. After three days rioting, 34 people were dead. Federal troops had to be called in.

 Detroit burned again in 1967, when police stormed a speakeasy frequented by black men. A party was in full swing for soldiers returning from Vietnam. Cops turned billy clubs on patrons and onlookers alike. Five days later 43 were dead, more than 7,000 arrested, and 2,000 buildings were burned. The National Guard and the 82nd Airborne had to be called in.

I was there.

And so Detroit has the distinction of being the only American city to have been occupied by the United States Army three times.

The way a society dies is a measure of the way that society lived.

Pass it on.

[Note — If you are a Facebook friend of Todd Levin’s please leave your comments on his page, rather than below. Thanks]

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true?  See for yourself. See more. 

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com,

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Tolerance, Freedom & Peace Comments No Comments »

19th Apr 2013

Names as Art and Pre-Matter in Post Conceptual Art

“A good name is rather to be chosen than great riches, [and] loving favour rather than silver and gold.”-Proverbs 22:1

Your first name, and (probably your full name) in Hebrew is always hidden in my regular paintings, and also in one of the works below in this post.

This is true because Hebrew letters are phonetic and I use them for each and every stroke, as I copy out scriptural texts that I specifically select for each artwork.  Torah font Hebrew letters are the best set of symbols to represent the strings of elementary physics, which are the building block of the universe. Since I use many tests or repeat texts to gain as many strokes as a work takes, all of my regular works have enough strokes to not only easily create anyone’s name, usually there are enough of the letters needed to also create the names of an average person’s relatives also, and for the larger works, friends and even actual face-to-face acquaintances. [

Most Jews have a Hebrew name; others have names that are from Hebrew, such as Mary, James, Joseph and Anna. However everyone’s name can be transliterated into Hebrew easily because Hebrew is phonic; for example, in two different images below the names  “Leigh” and “Larry” are transliterated into Hebrew.

The images below are shown in the order that I created them.

I created a small card for a childhood friend Sharon and then one for her adult daughter Leigh, who have been very kind and helpful to me.

Although they are Christians, I wanted to make the cards more personal, so I used their names in Hebrew (Sharon is a name from the Bible), plus also in English. Unlike my other works I wanted them to actually be able to read their names. You should be able to do that also.Sharon's Sunset by Judy Rey WassermanSharon’s Sunset by Judy ReyWasserman

Sharon is an inspired and inspiring woman, so the image of a sunset was used. A sunset can always be understood as anmoment of inspiration, which is also a new beginning.

.Leigh's Tree

Leigh’s Tree by Judy Rey Wasserman

Leigh is a healer, so her card is of an image of a tree, which symbolically refers to the Tree of Life.

Both of the above works were created in the late summer of 2012.

I thought about the idea of purposefully including names, readable names, and possibly names in English in my works for seven months.

Then I created another card, for a relative of mine, of a sunset, which uses the scripture text of Genesis 1 for the water color pencils and then adds black ink letters of his full name in English for the darker strokes in the work.  That image is not shown to protect his privacy.

This week I created another, slightly larger work (7×5 inches) based on a several layers that are Genesis 1-2:7. Then I added several more complete layers from both the Genesis text t and also the name Larry in both Hebrew and English.  Below the image I have included, reading from left to right lamed, resh, and yud – to write Larry in Hebrew. You
can fairly easily find them and also the English letters in the image.

Sunset for Leonardo Da Vinci's Birthday with Larry's Name for his Birthday by Judy Rey Wasserman

Sunset for Leonardo Da Vinci’s Birthday with Larry’s Name for his Birthday by Judy Rey Wasserman

Larry in Hebrew

Hebrew letters  that make the sound of the name Larry. You can find them in the image above in many places.

I continue t ponder and pray about the idea of purposefully including names in the strokes. If you have comments or suggestions, please write them below.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com,

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15th Mar 2013

Peggy Guggenheim — Woman of Valor Portrait

As an heiress and member of the Guggenheim family, Peggy Guggenheim ((August 26, 1898 – December 23, 1979 ) was a socialite with many also famous friends, many of whom were artists and writers.

Selecting the text(s) that I will use to create a portrait can take as long, or almost as long as creating the basic black and white Essence Portrait. I do a lot of research on every subject, including interviews when possible. Then, based on that information, based on those understandings,  I do more research using a Concordance, looking up keywords and researching texts. Every now and then I just “know” what text to use, because I am somewhat familiar with the Bible and it seems obvious.

The choice of text for my new Essence Portrait of  Peggy Guggenheim was immediately clear and obvious to me: Proverbs 31, also known as Woman of Valor.

Peggy Guggenheim is known for being a great art collector and generous public benefactor. However, as an artist, I appreciate her as having been more than a great collector, she was a woman who discovered and championed great artists. I has been said that we might not have had Abstract Expressionism without her support for the artists. This makes her more than a collector, she was an important patron and benefactor of artists.

Peggy Guggenheim by Judy Rey Wasserman - strokes are Proverbs 31

Peggy Guggenheim – Proverbs 31 by Judy Rey Wasserman

A great deal has been written about Peggy Guggenheim, and even by her in her autobiography, about her life, her adventures as an art collector and gallery owner, her relationships with artists and writers, and her many marriages and loves.

As a young woman, on a self-selected art tour to see more art, she journeyed from her native New York City Western Europe, where she met just about every influential artist at that time, including Pablo Picasso, Marcel Duchamp, Mondrian, Leger, Henry Moore, Hans Arp, Brancusi, Alexander Calder and Anton Pevsner, Jean Cocteau, and Max Ernst, who she was married to for a couple of years.

Her interest in collecting art and friendships led her to open a gallery in London where she could show the works of her friends. She gave Wassily Kandinsky his first-ever London show, and followed that with  an exhibition of contemporary sculpture featuring works of Henry Moore, Hans Arp, Brancusi, Alexander Calder and Anton Pevsner.

After Hitler invaded Paris, she abandoned her idea of opening a museum in London dedicated to a collection of works by Modern Art, and returned to New York City.

In October 1942, her museum-gallery, Art of This Century, opened in Manhattan, exhibiting all her Cubist, Abstract and Surrealist acquisitions. She showed the works of leading European artists (many mentioned above) in her gallery, but also met and showed the works of the new, and unknown, American Abstract Expressionists, including Robert Motherwell, Mark Rothko, Janet Sobel, and Clyford. Most importantly she is credited with discovering (she had a good eye!), arranging for the first show (s) and also championing the work of Jackson Pollack.

Peggy Guggenheim by Judy Rey Wasserman - strokes are Proverbs 31

Close up of portion of Peggy Guggenheim – Proverbs 31 by Judy Rey Wasserman

(Can you spot some of the Torah font Hebrew letters used? Apart from the clear and obvious ones, you can spot some of the letters that are used as strokes, especially heys, vavs and yuds, which are often used near eyes of my subjects.)

Despite Peggy Guggenheim’s two brief, but very influential stints as an art dealer, her galleries really existed to showcase the art she loved, and had purchased, rather than as business venture aimed at making money. After the war, she returned to Europe in 1948 when her collection was exhibited at the Venice Biennale, introducing Pollock, Rothko and Arshile Gorky to Europe, alongside her works of previous Modern movements and artists, such as the Cubists and Surrealists.

Her collection continued to grow. It toured  across Europe, and was shown in Florence, Milan, Amsterdam, Brussels and Zurich.

By 1951 she had purchased and resided in the Palazzo Venier dei Leoni on the Grand Canal., where he collection then resided. She began a tradition of opening her collection and home to the general public every summer.  She left her collection and the palace to the Solomon Guggenheim Foundation. It is one of the must go-to art destinations in Venice, and the world.

A great deal has been written about Peggy Guggenheim, and even by her in her autobiography, about her life, her adventures as an art collector and gallery owner, her relationships with artists and writers, and her many marriages and loves. Reading about her life is an interesting way to discover more about the history of Modern Art.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Collecting, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art Comments No Comments »

08th Mar 2013

Theo van Gogh – Essence Portrait

Dealers become famous and then remembered in art history primarily for the artists that they discovered and represented long before they became well known or recognized as important artists. Discovering or strongly championing an unknown but one day destined to become and remain a blue-chip artist is a dealer’s ticket, basically the only ticket, to art history immortality.

That kind of truly risky and often somewhat expensive championing of an artist is and was rare. Of course, artists that offer a new way of painting or producing art who will change art history, are also rare. It takes a dealer with vision and courage to support the work of such an artist\; to buy their works (when they are not selling), advance money to an unrecognized artist, and continue to both cheer the artist on while promoting works while the establishment continues to ignore them as they are ahead of their time. It can be quite a gamble.

The majority of these far-sighted and intrepid dealers went out to the studios, cafes and bars where they met or learned about the artists they are known for discovering. Except for one of the most famous of all dealers.

Art dealer Theo van Gogh is not famous for the many artists whose works he successfully sold, most of whom were well known and collected. He discovered his one day to be a blue chip artist and one of the greatest artists of all time, artist while he was still in his crib, because Theo is the younger brother of Vincent van Gogh, and artist he championed but whose works he failed to sell in either of their lifetimes.
Theo van Gogh by Judy Rey Wasserman uses tests of Psalms 101, 123 and 133 for the strokes

Theo van Gogh (Psalms 101, 123, and 133) by Judy Rey Wasserman

Both Vincent and Theo worked for their uncle in a family owned business of art selling that had offices in both The Netherlands and Great Briton. This is how Vincent came to be in London, where he was also exposed to the great works of the English artists (obviously he was previously familiar with Ditch art, and their influence is clearly seen in the colors of his earliest works). Vincent moved on to seemingly fail at other things until he decided to be an artist.

Theo moved to Paris, where he continued to work as an art dealer and met many of the artists we now know as the Impressionists, plus, those that became the Pointillists and Gauguin. By this time Vincent had begun to take up art, and Theo invited his to Paris, to meet the artists there. Thus begins the time when more and more Theo helps to unfailingly
support Vincent’s art goals, both emotionally and financially.

It is said that Vincent van Gogh never sold a painting, but in actuality, his dealer and brother Theo bought his works in order to support him. However, Theo, who was successfully selling the works of far less avant garde artists, could not sell Vincents works.

Theo died of illness about six moths after Vincent succumbed to a gunshot wound, that new evidence indicates may not have been self inflicted. They are buried side-by-side in Auvers-sur-Oise, France.

Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, Theo’s widow, continued Theo’s efforts. She edited and produced volumes of the brothers’ letters, and also promoted Vincent’s work and reputation through her donations of his work to various early retrospective exhibitions.and worked with artist friends of Vincent van Gogh’s to ultimately gain recognition for his art.

The strokes used to create this new Essence portrait of Theo van Gogh are the original letters from Psalms 101, 123, and 133. Psalm 133, also known as Hiney ma tov, was used about twice as much as the other two. Psalm 133is the psalm of friendship and brotherhood and references the relationship of Moses and Aaron. Since their father was a reverend it had to be well known to both Vincent and Theo. It says, “Behold, how good it is for brethren to dwell together in unity”

Vincent van Gogh (Psalm 113) by Judy Rey Wasserman

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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25th Jan 2013

Hands Duet (Study) by Da Vinci & Wasserman

We learn by doing.

This week I learned by doing. The new artwork at the bottom of this blog, Hands Duet (Study) by Da Vinci & Wasserman, is the result of that “doing”, which was inspired by art, including works by Picasso, Warhol and Basquiat, plus a special musical duet

In previous centuries students learned to write (compose in English) by copying the writings of recognized authors. I remember reading that in the USA it was especially popular for students to copy the writings of Ben Franklin.

“Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.” — Ben Franklin

As an art student my class was assigned to take a well known painting and create an illustrated report about the work, how it came to be, its development, etc. The illustrations had to be hand-drawn, not photocopied, however we were allowed to use tracings. We had a few days to think about what work we would select, and I chose Gurenica because it is large and would at least give me many elements to use for illustrations, plus it is gray-scale, which challenges me as myteacher(s) and I know that my personal strong suit is color. It would have been far too obvious and easy for me to have selected a work by Monet, van Gogh or Matisse.

In New York City the public library with greatest selection of art reference materials was the now closed Donnell, located not far from MOMA (and Guernica was then visiting MOMA). At the library I discover a treasure trove of information in reference books on Guernica. Picasso had made many sketches and paintings as he experimented with figures that he used to populate Guernica.

The one that fascinated me then and continues to live hauntingly in the memory behind my eyes is the figure know as the Weeping Woman. Ironically, Dora Maar, the model for Weeping Woman, also photographed the stages and progress of Guenica, providing me with so much material.

I spent many afternoons in the library meticulously tracing Picasso’s drawings and paintings, especially the variations of the Weeping Woman.

Although I never met Picasso in person (although I later learned my my teacher, Bertram Katz had), yet more than any class I have ever taken, Picasso taught me how to draw. It was a masterclass on how to draw, and how to plan out a great work of art, conducted by Picasso in library and then at MoMA as after the tracing sessions I would head to MoMA to closely examine and compare the sections of Guernica to the tracings of preliminary sketches I held in my hands.

Since that assignment I have traced drawings by other great artists because it helped me learn. Except for the Guernica report that I have kept, the tracings went into the trash, having accomplished their purpose.

When I decided to create my own Essence Portraits of various artists, no longer tracing, but drawing and painting following the Post Conceptual tenets of UnGraven Image (symbols as strokes) it was natural for me to turn to the self portraits of Rembrandt, Da Vinci, Monet and van Gogh (and coming soon Cezanne).

Recently, I realized that I have been blessed with another benefit from the Guennica assignment, I am very comfortable “working” with great artists.

Other Contemporary and Modern artists have appropriated works or parts of works by renowned artists, or unrecognized designers of commercial products, such as Brillo boxes or the Marlboro Man. Famously, Andy Warhol appropriated Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa and in his latter The Last Supper paintings, which he made very much his own.

Thanks to modern technology, iconic actors and singers are reappearing in new works musical works and commercials as their images and music are combined with new ones. My favorite, and the inspiration for my new art series, is a duet of the now adult Natalie Cole her father Nat King Cole singing “Unforgettable”.

A few years ago, when I first saw the new “Unforgettable” video, I thought it would be lovely to be able to accomplish the same thing in art, a duet that does not appropriate a work into something totally different of my own, but instead harmonizes, works with another great artist to create our new work while I manage to acknowledge the “parental” inspiration of the other artist. The only paintings that I can think of that managed to successfully be duets, where the clear voices of two different artists were clearly seen, without one overshadowing the other are the ones from Warhol and Basquiat, but they were both alive at the time.

This is the second Duet work in the series. It is a study that began as an accident as I forgot to set the fine art printer to black only — and it produced the Da Vinci drawing of hands (altered from the original sketches to just show the hands against a white background) in sepia and umber. It was late in the day, and rather than print a new black and white version, I began to kind of “trace”, in Post Conceptual UnGraven Image style, some of the darer area is black. I used the letters of Deuteronomy 6 for the strokes because I had a print out of it at hand from the Essence Portrait I had just created with that text. I was just fooling around, tracing Da Vinci’s shapes and lines by using Torah font letters as my strokes.

In the spirit of the Duets idea, I added the blue to the sleeves. That had appeal so I continued on with another archival pigment ink pen that claims to be pure brown, but is more orange-sepia to me. Whatever, the color works here.

From Picasso and other artists I learned to call  a smaller work “Study” to indicate that the artist is not really sure where this is going, is experimenting, and in not way wants this work credited as a major one. Certainly for Da Vinci this comes from a sketch, not a finished drawing.
Duet Hands by Da Vinci & Wasserman

Hands Duet (study) by Leonardo Da Vinci and Judy Rey Wasserman

Wasserman’s strokes are the Torah font letters of Deuteronomy 6

See previous blog posts and images about Leonardo Da Vinci and Picasso by Judy Rey Wasserman

Did Leonardo Da Vinci Envision Post Conceptual Art?

Leonardo Da Vinci Essence Portrait

Pablo Picasso’s Essence Portrait – Psalm 46

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com,

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16th Jan 2013

Romp through Modern & Contemporary Art in What Are You Looking At?

What Are You Looking At? by Will Gompertz is a wonderful romp through the narrative history of art from Impressionism to the present day.

What Are You Looking At? by Will Gompertz Gompertz is an art insider, the former director of London’s Tate Gallery and now the Arts Editor for the BBC. He knows where the bodies — or paintbrushes– are buried. He shares his “secrets” in a gossipy tell-all style laced with with and laugh provoking humor. Art stars of the past 150 years come alive and dry history becomes a stand up comedy routine, which is how this book first began. What Are You Looking At?, began as stand-up comedy at a Fringe Festival. Although funny and irrelevant, Gompertz always manages to pay homage to the great art and artists that populate his pages.

Obviously, the prime audience for this book is people who are interested in art, or want to find out why a dead shark in a tank, a cube, or a canvas filled with drips could fetch such high prices. However, this is also splendid book for entrepreneurs or anyone who is involved with launching a radically new idea in any field because it shows the oft repeated history of innovators.

The history of modern art is populated with people who failed. And failed. They were mocked. They were rejected by those in the establishment. Where mocked. Yet, somehow, the radical innovative artist caught the attention of at least one person, who would support and help propel their ideas, which led to ultimate and great success. These relationships and their anecdotal stories, between artists and other artists (such as Manet and the younger Impressionists or Picasso and Braque),artists and dealers, and artists and collectors that make this book special.

The book takes off from the moment its cover is opened with an impressive and helpful road map–like timeline that elegantly visually shows the innovative, influential artists connected to the next radical (and innovative, influential artists) who they influenced. Even though I knew the history of Modern and Contemporary art, I saw connections in new ways.

Aside being a good gift for artists to give to family and friends who, well, just do not see Contemporary Art as Art, this book is also be a fun and even revealing for those who “know“ art history.

Note: Judy Rey Wasserman only reviews what she likes and is worth sharing with her friends, which includes readers and Twitter followers. This includes art shows, books, movies and sometimes even TV shows that deal with art or artists, or scientific and inspirational topics covered by the blog at artofseeingthedivine.com.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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09th Jan 2013

Does the Art Market Have More Than One Bubble?

The “art market” is like champagne; it is exciting, has bubbles and can make some people a bit giddy. Some of these champagne art bubbles can, and will, burst. That is the history of the art market, and as its history repeats itself, its future. We saw this happen when the French Academy favored the art stars of its day, refusing to allow in the group dubbed: Impressionists.  The ascending bubbles of many of the established Academy artists burst over time and their works sell today for far less than those of the then new and radical Impressionists who struggled to earn a living.

Currently in print and online an ever growing swarm of articles posit that the works the Modern and Contemporary artists whose works have reached the highest auction prices point the likelihood that the Art Market is a bubble that is about to burst.  Seems to me that the lessons of Western Art history are being avoided as carefully as the obvious pun on the reality that bubbles also “pop”, since the artists most maligned are actually Pop artists or related to Pop Art.  The artists most mentioned and in the cross-hairs of the controversy stirring art business writers are: Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst.

Andy Warhol Double Denied by Judy Rey Wasserman

Psalm 19 (Andy Warhol) Double Un-Denied by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Psalm 19

The history of the art market is damp with the many burst bubbles of various individual artists, as their contributions to the ongoing thrust of art history were reevaluated.  However, the entirety of the Art Market never burst, just the market for specific individual artists. The opposite is also true as the works of other, previously less well known artist became more revered and their prices increased. A good example of this would be the Barbizon artists who are credited with influencing the Impressionists and Post Impressionists.

Since the Renaissance successfully investing in art has always been elegantly simple and often quite financially accessible for the middle class as well as the very wealthy. All one needs to do is discover the next artist who will change the history of art and invest in him (or her) before they are finally discovered by the very rich, so their prices went up.

The history of Modern Art is full of true stories of now iconic ultra blue-chip artists were at first rejected because their work was too radical and different from what was popular until they came along.  Sensational or weird is often mistaken for radical — which means a new way of making or conceiving art – a different focus.

Monet, van Gogh, Kandinsky, Picasso, Pollack and Warhol are all artists who pioneered new and radical art, and ways of making art, in their own times.  Look back through the history of art and it can easily be seen that great artists are trailblazers, a risk takers, who contributed more than just a unique style that could later be built upon by another radical, trailblazing, risk taking artist.

There are many artists who are painting Impressionist works today. Some are fantastic – but they are not radical, not reformers, they are only elegantly plowing a previously well plowed field and the best make a good living. So, we do not revere their work. No risk.

Etched into art history are names of art dealers, such as Paul Durand-Ruel Ambroise Vollard, Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, Peggy Guggenheim, Irving Blum, and Leo Castelli, because they originally championed the works of artists mentioned previously – they risked.

Leo Castelli Deuteronomy 6 portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

Deuteronomy 6 (Leo Castelli) by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Deuteronomy 6

In a recent letter to the editor of the New York Times, entitled “Invitation to a Dialogue: An Art Market Bubble?” William Cole juxtaposed the 1971 the Metropolitan Museum of Art acquisition of Velázquez’s “Portrait of Juan de Pareja” for $5.5 million ($31.4 million in 2012 dollars), then the highest price ever paid for a work of art with the considerably higher prices (even when adjusted for inflation) reached at auction for the top selling Modern and Contemporary artists.

Museum curators know that some works are difficult to hang as they will “steal” the scene from the other works in the room.  Yet, as an artist, I can easily mention or imagine hanging an equally good work by Monet, van Gogh, Cezanne, Kandinsky, Picasso, Pollack and Warhol near Velázquez’s “Portrait of Juan de Pareja”, without anyone outrageously stealing the show.

 van Gogh Psalm 113 portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

Psalm 113 (Vincent van Gogh)  by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Psalm 113

Further, the behavior of collectors in 1971 in relation to a pre-modern masterwork does not reflect what such a work could sell for at auction today. There are exceedingly few masterworks by great artists that predate modern art that are available at auction. What might be relevant to the discussion is the recently rediscovered and authenticated Da Vinci “Salvator Mundi,” a 2-foot-high (0.6 meter) panel painting Christ, once owned by King Charles I, valued by dealers at a record $200 million.

Da Vinci, and almost all once radical, blue-chip scene stealing artists have one other thing in common. They have all inspired other later artists who in turn were radical, scene stealing and became or will become blue-chip artists. Both Koons and Hirst are influenced by Warhol. The question remains: what new, truly radical artist will be influenced by their works, if any? It is perhaps a bit soon to answer such a question.

The exhibit at the Metropolitan shows some of the many artists who have been influenced by Andy Warhol, and more artists, such as myself (armed with a manifesto) are now waiting in the wings.  As Eric Shiner, Director of The Andy Warhol Museum, noted in his letter-reply to the editor of the New York Times, “Warhol changed the visual vocabulary of the United States, and by extension the world, through his radical departure from preconceived notions of what art is, how it functions, and, yes, ultimately how it is sold, traded and collected.”

Recessions, depressions, inflations, or boon times can change the monetary worth of an individual masterpiece, since the value of the currency itself changes. Does the essential value of the Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Michelangelo’s David or Rembrandt’s The Night Watch really change based on the economy or currency valuation? Of course not.

While investors at auctions can make straws out of paper money to inflate or prop up the failing market for an artist who is clever but never truly art-radical, eventually whatever is only given shape by air (or gas) will burst or dissipate. Secondary galleries are littered with the works of artists from the nineteenth and early twentieth century who were well known in their time, but were not at the forefront of the movement they followed and never inspired the work of an artist that became blue chip. Quietly, one by one, those little bubbles burst as the prices for those artworks, when inflation is factored in, devalue in price.

The whole of the art market will not suffer, or decrease in value, because historically that is not what occurs. The market for individual artists burst. Sometimes, seemingly all at once due to financial conditions in the society, or because the new radical artists come along, the artists who only have style begin to seem less important or valuable.

Art history continues to be written by artists with radical new ideas, but the art market continues to be a version of history repeating itself.

Your comments are welcomed below.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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