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Archive for the 'Art Theory & Show Reviews' Category

09th Jan 2013

Does the Art Market Have More Than One Bubble?

The “art market” is like champagne; it is exciting, has bubbles and can make some people a bit giddy. Some of these champagne art bubbles can, and will, burst. That is the history of the art market, and as its history repeats itself, its future. We saw this happen when the French Academy favored the art stars of its day, refusing to allow in the group dubbed: Impressionists.  The ascending bubbles of many of the established Academy artists burst over time and their works sell today for far less than those of the then new and radical Impressionists who struggled to earn a living.

Currently in print and online an ever growing swarm of articles posit that the works the Modern and Contemporary artists whose works have reached the highest auction prices point the likelihood that the Art Market is a bubble that is about to burst.  Seems to me that the lessons of Western Art history are being avoided as carefully as the obvious pun on the reality that bubbles also “pop”, since the artists most maligned are actually Pop artists or related to Pop Art.  The artists most mentioned and in the cross-hairs of the controversy stirring art business writers are: Andy Warhol, Jeff Koons and Damien Hirst.

Andy Warhol Double Denied by Judy Rey Wasserman

Psalm 19 (Andy Warhol) Double Un-Denied by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Psalm 19

The history of the art market is damp with the many burst bubbles of various individual artists, as their contributions to the ongoing thrust of art history were reevaluated.  However, the entirety of the Art Market never burst, just the market for specific individual artists. The opposite is also true as the works of other, previously less well known artist became more revered and their prices increased. A good example of this would be the Barbizon artists who are credited with influencing the Impressionists and Post Impressionists.

Since the Renaissance successfully investing in art has always been elegantly simple and often quite financially accessible for the middle class as well as the very wealthy. All one needs to do is discover the next artist who will change the history of art and invest in him (or her) before they are finally discovered by the very rich, so their prices went up.

The history of Modern Art is full of true stories of now iconic ultra blue-chip artists were at first rejected because their work was too radical and different from what was popular until they came along.  Sensational or weird is often mistaken for radical — which means a new way of making or conceiving art – a different focus.

Monet, van Gogh, Kandinsky, Picasso, Pollack and Warhol are all artists who pioneered new and radical art, and ways of making art, in their own times.  Look back through the history of art and it can easily be seen that great artists are trailblazers, a risk takers, who contributed more than just a unique style that could later be built upon by another radical, trailblazing, risk taking artist.

There are many artists who are painting Impressionist works today. Some are fantastic – but they are not radical, not reformers, they are only elegantly plowing a previously well plowed field and the best make a good living. So, we do not revere their work. No risk.

Etched into art history are names of art dealers, such as Paul Durand-Ruel Ambroise Vollard, Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, Peggy Guggenheim, Irving Blum, and Leo Castelli, because they originally championed the works of artists mentioned previously – they risked.

Leo Castelli Deuteronomy 6 portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

Deuteronomy 6 (Leo Castelli) by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Deuteronomy 6

In a recent letter to the editor of the New York Times, entitled “Invitation to a Dialogue: An Art Market Bubble?” William Cole juxtaposed the 1971 the Metropolitan Museum of Art acquisition of Velázquez’s “Portrait of Juan de Pareja” for $5.5 million ($31.4 million in 2012 dollars), then the highest price ever paid for a work of art with the considerably higher prices (even when adjusted for inflation) reached at auction for the top selling Modern and Contemporary artists.

Museum curators know that some works are difficult to hang as they will “steal” the scene from the other works in the room.  Yet, as an artist, I can easily mention or imagine hanging an equally good work by Monet, van Gogh, Cezanne, Kandinsky, Picasso, Pollack and Warhol near Velázquez’s “Portrait of Juan de Pareja”, without anyone outrageously stealing the show.

 van Gogh Psalm 113 portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

Psalm 113 (Vincent van Gogh)  by Judy Rey Wasserman
Strokes = Original Torah font letters of Psalm 113

Further, the behavior of collectors in 1971 in relation to a pre-modern masterwork does not reflect what such a work could sell for at auction today. There are exceedingly few masterworks by great artists that predate modern art that are available at auction. What might be relevant to the discussion is the recently rediscovered and authenticated Da Vinci “Salvator Mundi,” a 2-foot-high (0.6 meter) panel painting Christ, once owned by King Charles I, valued by dealers at a record $200 million.

Da Vinci, and almost all once radical, blue-chip scene stealing artists have one other thing in common. They have all inspired other later artists who in turn were radical, scene stealing and became or will become blue-chip artists. Both Koons and Hirst are influenced by Warhol. The question remains: what new, truly radical artist will be influenced by their works, if any? It is perhaps a bit soon to answer such a question.

The exhibit at the Metropolitan shows some of the many artists who have been influenced by Andy Warhol, and more artists, such as myself (armed with a manifesto) are now waiting in the wings.  As Eric Shiner, Director of The Andy Warhol Museum, noted in his letter-reply to the editor of the New York Times, “Warhol changed the visual vocabulary of the United States, and by extension the world, through his radical departure from preconceived notions of what art is, how it functions, and, yes, ultimately how it is sold, traded and collected.”

Recessions, depressions, inflations, or boon times can change the monetary worth of an individual masterpiece, since the value of the currency itself changes. Does the essential value of the Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, Michelangelo’s David or Rembrandt’s The Night Watch really change based on the economy or currency valuation? Of course not.

While investors at auctions can make straws out of paper money to inflate or prop up the failing market for an artist who is clever but never truly art-radical, eventually whatever is only given shape by air (or gas) will burst or dissipate. Secondary galleries are littered with the works of artists from the nineteenth and early twentieth century who were well known in their time, but were not at the forefront of the movement they followed and never inspired the work of an artist that became blue chip. Quietly, one by one, those little bubbles burst as the prices for those artworks, when inflation is factored in, devalue in price.

The whole of the art market will not suffer, or decrease in value, because historically that is not what occurs. The market for individual artists burst. Sometimes, seemingly all at once due to financial conditions in the society, or because the new radical artists come along, the artists who only have style begin to seem less important or valuable.

Art history continues to be written by artists with radical new ideas, but the art market continues to be a version of history repeating itself.

Your comments are welcomed below.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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13th Dec 2012

Post Sandy Chelsea Art Shows

In New York City’s  Chelsea there are some must-see art gallery shows that will brighten your holiday season. While some galleries remain closed, most Chelsea galleries have reopened, or reopened one or more of several sites.

The sidewalks are all clear, or clear enough to easily navigate, but every possible parking space if taken by commercial trucks that are involved with rebuilding, renovating and restoring galleries that remain closed or partly open, with special attention to basements, even when the street floor above gallery has reopened its doors.

As reported previously, David Zwirner is committed to helping the community of galleries and artists to recover from Hurricane Sandy Relief Fund of the Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA). The effort continues via the gallery’s website’s news page’s links. So my first stop was the open David Zwirner gallery at 519 West 19th Street, to see Diana Thater;’s multi-screen video Chernobyl. I rarely write about art videos since I only cover what I appreciated and can recommend but since I have a professional background in professional film, I am unfairly prejudiced toward story structure and production values. However, I can easily recommend this show, which explores the continuing effects of the man-made Chernobyl disaster surrounding the viewer, bringing the viewer inside of what is uninhabitable.

Diana Thater's Chernobyl

Image above is an installation view of Diana Thater’s Chernobyl

As I write this blog the 12.12.12. Concert for Sandy relief is actually playing in the background on PBS. The devastation of Hurricane Sandy is not man-made, a point that seeing Chernobyl at this time elegantly delivers.

Sikkema Jenkins & Co. has a sumptuous exhibit of large scale works by Mark Bradford.  My affinity for Bradford is obvious as he sometimes uses words, that include collaged and found words, which he covers with paint or more collage materials and then he  partially removes a layer, leaving the written meaning is obscured. Unfortunately the images on Sikkema Jenkins’ website and the one here cannot begin to show the engaging tactile surface and details of these large works. So go see them!

Judy Rey Wasserman at Sikkema Jenkins

The image above is of me, all bundled up as it was cold when I left Southampton earlier. I’m standing to the side of  Mark Bradford’s Her Mouth Across the Table, 2012.

It was a pleasure to see that the Nicole Klagsbrun gallery is back open with a show of many artist’s works. Make sure you look up above you when you enter the main room! It is a good show presented by a gallery that was hit very hard by the storm that we are fortunate to have back up in Chelsea. Also of special note is an untitled work or ink on green paper by Carroll Dunham.

The James Cohan Gallery has an exhibit of Trenton Doyle Hancock’s ongoing painting saga. His work never fails to fascinate and amuse me thanks to his inventive use of interweaving a storyline of words with his images.

More words, this by Glenn Ligon via a show entitled, Neon , which is the media used. These can be discovered in Ligon’s first solo show at Luhring Augustine. These works can be appreciated from the gallery website, so if you cannot make it to the show—the best idea, then enjoy the online version.

The Gagosian Gallery at 555 West 24th Street was open with an exhibit by Ed Ruscha of images of books that turns the gallery into a larger than life private library. Some of these are very tongue – er paintbrush – in cheek.  If you love books—as I do – you will enjoy this Ruscha show.

 I have always been a great fan of Chuck Close’s works. I was especially looking forward to his new solo show at Pace gallery. And I was surprised and fell in love with close’s work all over again,because there are new works that take his ideas of color and visual understanding in a somewhat new direction that I find enchanting. These new works take what could best be described as a pixelated portrait that is created with the gentle and subdued watercolors. Instead of a in your face pixelation, the result is a soft and sumptuous new Twenty-first Century next step from Pointillism.  I have heard close speak on how computers grew out of the art of weaving, especially tapestries, which developed a card system. These new works are clearly the intelligent painterly result of his understandings of tapestry meets PC . This is further developed by the large scale black and white tapestry portraits, that can easily be mistaken for photographs.  So, from me, the artist who paints with words (letters) for strokes, and also writes, I have only one word for these new works from Chuck Close: Wow!

The night before my visit the PaulKasmin Gallery had opened a new solo show by photographer David LaChappelle, whose work I also always appreciate, so I figured I would be able to cover it for this blog.  Usually I shy away from covering photography,even when I appreciate the work. However, David LaChapelle fully stages and arranges his scenes or images and the result is a rather painterly approach that I easily comprehend and can appreciate much like a painting.

In his new works LaChapelle has taken broken statues of celebrities from wax museums and arranged them into the show’s title, Still Lifes, and I suspect the double entendre is intended. According to the PR release, LaChapelle is, “addressing the fleeting nature of humanity, fame, celebrity and power.” These concerns are also Warhol celebrity portrait territory. LaChappelle has a new, original and authentic way to express the broken, skewed and impermanent façade of fame and power over others.

What makes these images hauntingly significant is the problem inherent with most was museum sculptures.  Unlike a good art portrait or sculpture, the wax figures, although often anatomically correct from life casts, fail to capture the spark of humanity or personality of those portrayed. Just as Warhol’s portraits aimed at losing that humanity, and being machine driven images, these wax figures, although recognizable are all a bit off, revealing only the mask, not the individual.  This is further revealed by the wax figure of Heath Ledger in full mask makeup as the Joker, which is the most true to life of the show—naturally because human is already hidden behind a mask! Again, I urge you to see the show, but you can get a good idea from the link to the gallery website above.

The Paul Kasmin Gallery is another gallery that stepped up to help the ADAA’s Sandy Relief Fund, by partnering with Artspace.com for a benefit and sales of gallery and artist donated artworks. The relief effort continues. Please make a donation online at Sandy Relief Fund.

David LaChapelleill Life Michael Jackson

David LaChapelle

Still Life: Michael Jackson 01, 2009-2012,

chromogenic print

72 x 71 inches, 182.9 x 180.3 cm

Images are used by the courtesy of the David Zwirner gallery and the Paul Kasmin Gallery. The iPhone image of me at Sikkema Jenkins was taken and used with the gallery’s consent.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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02nd Nov 2012

Mark Rothko Basic Essence Portrait

“Pictures must be miraculous.” — Mark Rothko

This Basic Essence Portrait portrait of Mark Rothko is created with strokes that are the original Torah font letters of Psalm 101 and Ecclesiastes chapters 1 and 2.

Mark Rothko’s work beguiled and confused and deeply effected me as a school girl and then college student studying art. I did not understand Abstract expressionism, or much like it. I wanted to dismiss it as art.

I wanted to move from move from DaDa, Expressionism, Surrealism, Cubism to Pop, ignoring the Abstract Espressionists, although I could admit that I did comprehend some worth in Pollack, Kline and Martin. But Rothko’s works kept tripping me up, grabbing me as I strove to walk past his large paintings and decimating all my theories and ideas about art.

This is because Rothko can always connect with me emotionally and has reduced me to tears, which as a girl I was embarrassed to show.

I see, but do not intellectually understand it, that Rothko paints raw emotion. Like Vincent van Gogh, who painted non-religious subjects but considered himself to be a religious or spiritual artist, Rothko showed me that narrative is not what makes a work of art depict the Divine.

For me, Rothko is one of the greatest religious artists who ever lived. I have not yet been to the Rothko Chapel, but it is on my bucket list.

Looking at Rothko’s sublime paintings, feeling depths of emotions I lost the need for the subject matter, the narrative image, to be what is most important about a work of art. I could never have developed a theory of art that asserts that the meaning of a painting is in its strokes without this lesson.

So as I work my way through my first series of Essence Portraits of artists who have influenced my art, and who I greatly admire, the seventh is Mark Rothko.

Portrait of Mark Rothko by Judy Rey Wasserman strokes are psalm 101 and Ecclesiastes 1 & 2

Mark Rothko basic Essence Portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman created with strokes that are the original Torah font letters of Psalm 101 and Ecclesiastes chapters 1 and 2.

“Art to me is an anecdote of the spirit, and the only means of making concrete the purpose of its varied quickness and stillness.” — Mark Rothko

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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25th Jul 2012

ArtMRKT Hamptons 2012

The second artMRKT Hamptons, hosted by the Bridgehampton Historical Society featured 35 contemporary and modern galleries from across the U.S, from July 19 through 22 , 2012.

The focus was on new works by contemporary artists, most of whom are mid career or emerging, although a few galleries included secondary market works.

Kim McCarty,

Untitled (Maroon Girl Looking Down) (2011)

Watercolor On Paper

30h x 23w in

at Morgan Lehman booth

Benefiting the Parrish Art Museum, Brooklyn chef Leon Gunn welcomed the Parrish Art Museum members, donors and board to a well-attended preview event barbecue on Thursday, July 19th.

Helen Altman's Sea Turtle

Helen Altman

Sea Turtle, 2012

torch drawing on paper 22 1/2 x 22″

at DCKT Contemporary booth

The fair presented an opportunity for Hamptonites to furnish their second homes while discovering artists and art. The majority of the works displayed reflected the financial times we live in, as they were smaller and portable, rather that the huge paintings that cab be eye catching, but costly for a gallery to transport to a fair and generally more expensive works by an artist.

Images above included courtesy the galleries.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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20th Jun 2012

Painting in Codes

I paint in codes. I even draw in codes. The codes are hidden within the works, making the meaning of the work embedded within its symbol-strokes.

The code I use is one that I can find from any culture that is alpha –numeric, binary and phonic. As such it elegantly represents the strings of Elementary physics, which are the essential building blocks of our physics universe according to elementary physics. According to elementary physicists there are eleven of the pre-matter (or energy) strings in our universe, plus their opposites exist in alternate universe(s). The code that I use has twenty-two basic symbols, which we know as letters.

“Art is the Queen of all sciences communicating knowledge to all the generations of the world” – Leonardo da Vinci

I hide the coded symbols that I use for my strokes.

I use each symbol of a code used is any artwork, just the way other artists throughout history have uses strokes to create their narrative imagery.

The viewer should not be able to read the coded words in my artworks any more that the can “read” the reality that they see daily, which is comprised of atoms, and then the even smaller particles, and then even smaller strings, which present as the physical universe.

Leonardo da Vinci’s work is perpetually in the news as learned people discover and seek to discover codes in his work. Additionally, a musician discovered a way to show a musical piece in the “The Last Summer” using the bread on the table and hand movements as notes. It seems to work, but I am not a musician so I only understand what I read.

Yet, the codes in my work are also music, which is chanted or sung to this day.

When I began painting and then drawing using the original letters (Torah font) of Bible texts for strokes, the codes in da Vinci’s works had not yet been discovered. It seems somehow fitting that the genius artist who invented and predicted many modern inventions, taught us much about art, anatomy, and was fascinated with codes and hidden information was adding hidden meanings to his art, which is otherwise a revolutionary idea of the twenty-first century.

Ironically, in explaining the impact that Post Conceptual Art theory, and especially the branch of UnGraven Image has upon art and its history, I explain using da Vinci’s works, which most people easily know and recognize. We all agree that the Mona Lisa is a secular painting based on it’s narrative image, whereas da Vinci’s Last Supper is a religious work for all Christians, and even for many Jews as it is recognized that it depicts a seder.

However when I create a portrait of secular person (for example, for someone not in the Bible), such as da Vinci himself, it can be considered both a secular work (based on the subject) and also a fully religious work based upon its strokes. Also, my work is always science based, as my symbol-strokes represent the strings of elementary physics.

I think da Vinci would like Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art. And that makes me smile.

Isaiah 48 (Leonard da Vinci) by a basic Essence Portrait by Judy Rey Wasserman

To discover how you can commission an Essence Portrait (and that can be turned into also color portrait versions) at artofseeingthedivine.com

Other articles of interest: Did Leonardo Da Vinci Envision Post Conceptual Art? and Leonardo Da Vinci Essence Portrait

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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23rd May 2012

Beth Rudin DeWoody’s Art of 1945-1980 Los Angeles in 2012 Southampton

Thanks to Southampton ‘s Parrish Art Museum and the generosity of collector Beth Rudin DeWoody, Hamptonites and vacationers can go back in time to see the 1945-1980 Los Angeles artists, via the EST-3 exhibition, which is a part of DeWoody’s private collection. The exhibit runs through June 17, 2012 .

It is a knock-out of a show, that includes good works, and some not- to-be-missed works by Eleanor Antin, John Baldessari, Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Vija Celmins, Guy de Cointet, Robert Colescott, Bruce Conner, Jack Goldstein, Robert Graham, David Hockney, Dennis Hopper, Douglas Huebler, Mike Kelley, Ed Kienholz, John McCracken. John MacLaughlin, Matt Mullican, Ken Price, and Ed Ruscha.

The show is divided by curator David Pagel into three sections: People, Places and Things, which provide a framework for the diversity of work.

Frederick Hammersley’s Same difference, 1959

A few of the treasures of the show that I now hold in my memory and hope you will see for yourself are from People: a Dennis Hopper gelatin silver print of Andy Warhol, Henry Gelzahler, David Hockney and Jeff Goodman; and a wall of portrait drawings by Don Bachardy; from Places: Several Hockneys, including Bank, Palm Springs 1968 (colored pencil on paper), Mike Kelly’s hanging silk-screened banners on silk, and Eleanor Antin’s photo, and Ed Ruscha’s serigraphs from the Insects Portfolio; from Things: Vija Celmins’ Plastic Puzzle Piece 1966, which is a fur lined box containing 9 puzzle shaped Plexiglas pieces.

Beth Rudin DeWoody’s interest in California artists was spurred by the collection of her mother and step-father, plus her own visits to the area, beginning as a college student. She is now noted as one of the world’s foremost collectors of Modern and Contemporary art, plus she has also curated well reviewed gallery shows

.

Billy Al Bengston’s Untitled (dento)

“I believe in collecting both historical and contemporary art, “DeWoody has said. “It is really important to collect younger artists to keep them going, but I have also collected artists who were undervalued or underrated during their time, who were fabulous artists but may not have gotten the recognition they deserved.”

Matt Mullican’s Untitled (Mullican Poster)

At the Parrish Art Museum ‘s web site ( http://parrishart.org/ ) you will find further information plus a video interview by Parrish Art Museum ‘s Director Terri Sultan with Beth Rudin DeWoody in her New York City apartment ( http://parrishart.org/current.asp?id=430 ).

To see a previous blog review about exhibits curated by Beth Rudin DeWoody Click: The Collector as Curator

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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20th Apr 2012

$100 USA Genesis Sunset

Money, like art, can be seen and understood as a power that can be used to transform our lives.

For instance, money transforms lives when it is used to pay for a life saving operation or vaccination program, when it supplies a soup kitchen with much needed food or when it brings water to people who have no drinkable water due to natural or industrial polluting causes. Hillel Jesus would have called this “doing onto others as you would have them do unto you”, or more simply feeding the poor and visiting the sick*.”

A sunset is always a promise of a new beginning according to Genesis chapter 1. The new day both ends with a sunset celebration and begins with that sunset inspiring the next creation (day).

“And God saw the light, that it was good; and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness He called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day.” – Genesis 1:4-5

Like a sunset, money can be understood as a kind of new beginning, as a promise to be fulfilled.

Young children when given enough money in their hands to be able to actually purchase a toy often show us the excitement and wonderment of the transforming promise of money as they realize they can perhaps have almost anything – but not everything .

No one, not even the wealthiest person in the world can have everything that money can buy. We must choose. Creation and transformation, from Genesis until this very moment when you are reading this, always involve making a choice: this not that.

“Money never made a man happy yet, nor will it. The more a man has, the more he wants. Instead of filling a vacuum, it makes one.” – Benjamin Franklin

Sometimes it seems that we lack the chance to make choices with our money as we can have so many bills, debts, and expense necessities (like food, gas for our commutes, and clothes for the family). But at some point these were all choices we made and opportunities we selected or are selecting. With the money we have we get to choose to honor these choices and use the money that we must transform both our lives and the lives of others.

“Time extracts various values from a painter’s work. When these values are exhausted the pictures are forgotten, and the more a picture has to give, the greater it is.” – Henri Matisse

Below is an image of a new Genesis Sunset – In God We Trust painting entitled, $100 Genesis Sunset Alpeh. Many of you are familiar with my Genesis Sunset series, but this image also is a part of the new In God We Trust series that deals with worth, and includes money.

$100 Genesis Sunset Alpeh by Judy Rey Wasserman

The strokes used in $100 Genesis Sunset Alpeh Genesis 1-2:7 (for the sunset), Proverbs 13 for the Essence Portrait of Franklin, and Exodus 20-Ten Commandments for the rest of the bill. This new 2012 mixed media work is available as a 4 x 6 postcard size archival print that you can easily frame and display daily to inspire yourself and others who see it.

“The use of money is all the advantage there is in having it.” Benjamin Franklin

*Note: In the time of Jesus when visiting the sick meant going to clean up and take care of a sick person as there were no hospitals, nursing homes or visiting nurses. It meant working and providing, not simply bringing flowers or candy and having a nice visit.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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30th Mar 2012

Happy Birthday Vincent van Gogh!

Vincent van Gogh was born March 30, 1853 in Zundert, Netherlands. He is known as a Post-Impressionist painter, one of the best know artists world-wide and is credited for his influence on twentieth century art.

Vincent van Gogh has been my favorite artist and painter and now greatest artistic influence ever since I can remember.

My relationship with Vincent van Gogh began as soon as I was able to walk, as my parents took me to the Metropolitan Museum of Art once I could walk, and returned frequently on weekend days of bitter cold or inclement weather (when they could not take me to the playground), as the art delighted me and a kid can wear themselves out walking through the large museum and climbing the stairs. It quickly became and remains a personal “ritual” that the last stop is to see the van Goghs. My favorite painting in the world is there: Cypresses.

Psalm 113 — Vincent van Gogh, 2010, ink on paper, by Judy Rey Wasserman

Since I am founding Post Conceptual Art and a branch of that called as UnGraven Image  van Gogh’s art clearly continues to influence art to our twenty-first Century.

The idea that a secular narrative (image) can convey religious or spiritual content stems from van Gogh. Vincent van Gogh’s father was a minister in the Dutch Reformed Church. Later Vincent van Gogh had a stint as a missionary himself. He wanted people to view his paintings and feel his passion, and he was very passionate about God and His creation.

What makes an artist a “blue chip” artist is their influence on other artists, especially those who go on to also influence other artists. These ideas can later be found in the works of Kandinsky and Rothko, two of the artistic giants and influencers of the Twentieth century (and obviously me).

Psalm 113 — Vincent van Gogh (color #1) 2011, original tradigital print, by Judy Rey Wasserman

I hold that Warhol, who attended his church weekly all of his life, knew these ideas and artistically applied them to the landscape of his urban life, which was filled with news and commercial imagery made by human hands. My belief of this is backed by Warhol’s latter religious works, where he uses commercial brands, such as General Electric and Dove Soap, to symbolize divine light and the Holy Spirit.

At twelve years of age I was given a bus and then train pass, plus as a student I enjoyed free admission to all of the art museums in NYC. I spent most after school afternoons and weekends visiting them, most especially the Met and MoMA, and art galleries until I left college and the Art Student’s League. So, during my artistically formative years, I spent an inordinate amount of time, including many afternoons, simply looking at and studying van Gogh’s works.

At the Met I saw and learned that like Da Vinci, Rembrandt and J.M.W. Turner, van Gogh is a master of dualities. For me his later works burst with passion that at once expresses joy and glory along with pain and fury. As an adolescent, my life (and hormones) also raged with these seemingly disparate emotions, which The Cypresses and Sunflowers echoed, so I felt somehow heard and understood van Gogh in a way that no one else in my world managed to convey.

Van Gogh’s works also helped inspire my idea of using symbols (letters/numbers) for the strokes in a painting. At 8 or 9 years old, I was absent when the rest of my class learned Morse Code. I returned to take a test on it that I utterly failed but the class moved on. All I had was an introduction to the idea that dots and dashes could stand for letters, and to me the dots and dashes looked like the dots and dashes I was familiar with in van Gogh’s paintings. Since I could not read Morse Code, I never spoke of this to my Dad on our museum visits as he was a veteran who knew Morse Code, and my question would reveal my ongoing failure to learn it. For several years I actually thought van Gogh was somewhat painting in Morse Code.

As an adult, I have learned to see the “footprints” of the words of The Divine everywhere and always – even in the darkest moments. There is always a duality, light coming from dark as in Genesis 1. As an artist I work to show this understanding, which I learned from van Gogh in my own unique way, in my art.

The greatest lesson I learned from van Gogh is that visual fine art can change lives. It can inspire new understandings, bridges between people and cultures, and that great art, whatever the narrative, is always somehow holy and inspirational. I doubt that I would be an artist today, or even as good a human being as I continue to strive to become without his influence and spanning across time, his visual friendship, for which I aptly thank God, as van Gogh would have wished.

Portrait of Vincent van Gogh Sunset by Judy Rey Wasserman

Close up section of Psalm 113 and Genesis 1-2:7 — Vincent van Gogh Sunset study, 2012, mixed media on board, by Judy Rey Wasserman

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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02nd Feb 2012

Postcards from the Edge 2011 Sunset

Each year I donate a postcard to Visual AIDS’ Postcards from the Edge mainly because I have lost friends to AIDS and this happens to be a well run charity that I can support. Plus, of course, they solicit art from artists and I get the fun in exhibiting my postcard (along with 1000 plus others) in a top tier Chelsea gallery.

This year’s event was at the prestigious Cheim and Read. Many of the very best Chelsea NY best galleries have served with the event moving to a new venue each year.

At the time this blog is posted Postcards from the Edge benefit has raised over $83,000 and displayed the work of 1,475 artists. Thousands of guests attended, including those who pay to attend the jam-packed opening night where they stalk out the postcards that become available the following morning when they sell for $85.00 each.

So far, I have only donated Genesis: Sunrise Sunset painted postcards. Partially because since my first donation I learned that they sell, but also as Genesis I:7 is the theological (but not scientific) basis for Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory.

VisualAIDS Sunset 2011 is created of strokes that are all the original letters from Genesis 1-:27. It is a part of my Genesis: Sunset-sunrise series.

Visual AIDS Sunset 2011

By Judy Rey Wasserman

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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11th Jan 2012

Pablo Picasso’s Essence Portrait – Psalm 46

The basic Essence Portrait of Picasso is created with strokes that are the original letters of Psalm 46. It was completed at near the end of December 2011, just in time to be included in my annual card/print and blog image.

It is a departure for me. Previously I have somewhat mimicked the actual styles of the artists whose basic Essence Portraits I made. The Picasso portrait somewhat adheres to his earlier style, but includes references to his life and work “hidden” within the image.

The Harlequin pattern, again from his pre-Cubism works, can be seen at the bottom right of the image. Several of Picasso’s Harlequins have gone for near record breaking (at the time) amounts at auction.

Less obvious are the blobby looking fingers imagery that Picasso used in Guernica and other works. There finger tips can be found at the top far left of his head.

Also, the line of shadow on the portraits right forehead is basically the Atlantic shoreline that runs from Spain to France.  Picasso was born and educated in Spain, but spent his artistic life as an ex-patriot living in France , in protest of Franco’s regime. He is strongly associated and claimed as their artist by people in both countries.

So far I have only created Essence Portraits of artists who have influenced my work. Picasso’s Cubist idea of showing a object or person from all sided on a flat plane – depicting what the artist knows is there, but cannot see from his current perspective – helped lead me to portraying the smallest essences, the pre-matter or energy strings of elementary physics, which we also cannot see.

There is another, purely visual connection, or line that runs from Picasso’s Guernica directly to my work using letters as strokes. In my senior year in the High School of Music and Art, my beloved art teacher, Mr. Bertram Katz assigned me to do an in depth report on a painting.  Although, I would have preferred a van Gogh or Monet, I ended up with Guernica.  I discovered a treasure trove of information in the Donnell Library, that included may versions or studies of the Weeping Woman (also called the Wailing Woman), the bull, Horse, etc. I dutifully traced many of these for my report. It ended up being 30 odd pages of my tracings and written information.

I learned to make studies, multiple studies, until I had what I wanted, and then that it is OK to sell them all. I watched as the misery of the Weeping Woman was accentuated through Picasso’s experimentation. I remember that there were days that I could hardly wait for school to be over so that I could head back to the reference department at the Donnell to unlock more of the mystery of the creation of Guernica.  Plus, it helped that Guernica was still at the Museum of Modern Art so I could walk from the Donnell straight to MoMA to compare what I had just carefully traced to the final painting. I recall my parents questioning me after a week as to where I was actually going as I sort of disappeared for a few weeks, until my dad saw all the tracings and notes.

If you look closely at Guernica you can see that the horse’s coat is comprised of strokes that are lines that are in rows and look a lot like a simple letter I, or small l, or number 1, or Hebrew vav, which I recognized at the time, although I doubt it was what Picasso meant..My tracing of Picasso’s horse in Guernica was the first time I can recall using a symbol as a stroke.

Pablo Picasso (Psalm 46)

by Judy Rey Wasserman

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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