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Archive for the 'Vision & Science' Category

15th Sep 2021

Can Vision Control Feelings?

How a person sees can help create a happy and fulfilled life – or the opposite.

Medical advances that are restoring vision to the previously blind, along with brain imaging have uncovered truths about how human vision works.

Some of this information was discovered when medical breakthroughs for a few conditions allowed surgeons to restore the eyesight of adults who had been blind since birth or early childhood. While the procedures were a success, the patients were completely unable to see how many fingers were held up, recognize faces or see anything more than impressions of light.

People have been rendered blind, or blind in specific ways by damage to their brains, even though their eyes were fully functioning. For instance, one brain injured man can see, but is not able to recognize any faces. Why? Because his condition incapacitates the section of the brain dedicated to retaining memories of faces. They cannot compare the impressions of light to previous impressions of light to decode the information received from the newly seeing eyes.

How Vision Works

Scientific findings indicate that for the average sighted person 90% percent of vision takes place in the brain, not the eyes. [Average refers to people who have near normal vision with or without corrective lenses and normally healthy brains.]

The remaining ten percent (10%) of the process of vision occurs through the eyes, which send receive perceptions of light to the brain.

Most of the complex processes that we call vision happens as the brain decodes the perceptions of light received from the eyes. It does this by comparing and contrasting the perceptions to visual memories it has of prior perceptions.

The more visual memories a person has of different sights, including people, places, and things, the more perceptive a person is, especially in relation to what has been seen previously. These memories are stored variously in a person’s brain and can be interconnected or cross referenced.

The newly “healed” patients were effectively blind as they lacked any visual memories. Newborns lack visual memories, which is why they seem to see, but do not respond to visual information at first. Over time, with increased visual experience, the patients created visual memories. Eventually, much in the way that children do, they learned to see and understand complexities of color, space, form, density, etc. Then the brain automatically creates a memory of that information.

When an average adult sees something, the brain decodes the impressions of light sent by the eyes to make it usable and relevant. The similar memories that the brain uses may have additional meanings and understandings that are irrelevant decode the impressions of light but are understood or considered to be relevant by the brain.

Thoughts and memories are things

When the brain decodes impressions of light, it is decoding impressions of energy and pre-matter or basic particles. This is what light is. So, to the brain, data memories that are similar to the impressions received are relevant, and if those memories include more data of energy and basic particles it could be relevant, too.

The brain is bringing up many, many memories seemingly simultaneously, and even from different areas of the brain to decode a complex image that contains a lot of data that involves unfamiliar people and things. These memories can include emotion, which is energy and basic particles and like all memories is stored as such.

How Visual Memories Impact Emotions

If I person has a history of being upbeat or happy, beginning with a comfortable, supportive, and healthy childhood and continuing into adulthood, any emotional energy attached to the visual memories used for decoding are likely to be happy or at least neutral. These emotions may seem relevant to the brain as a part of the visual data since they offer additional information of energy and basic particles. Or they can simply be brought up as part of the memory package.

However, people who have childhoods and/or adult lives filled with stress, trauma and unwanted emotion are unconsciously reminded of emotions and unresolved memories as the brain decodes current impressions of light of people places and things that should be easy to encounter and non-threatening.

The memories used as the decoding data are not usually brought to consciousness, they do the job of decoding in the background. Yet emotions “attached” to the memories used to decode the current impressions of light may be felt.

People who tend to be sad, angry, fearful, guilty, or any other unwanted emotion, may be experiencing these emotions on an ongoing and even constant basis as their brains decode the impressions sent by their eyes. Their prior visual experiences and emotions from traumatic or stressful instances may be unconsciously remembered when the brain decodes simple objects or places, or even people who somehow remind the brain of previous people. This is why travelling to someplace new and strange can seem so uplifting—there are fewer memories with unwanted emotions “attached” to re-stimulate.

Memories of feelings are also stored by the brain and feelings that are stored. Emotions, which are usually produced by thought, whether conscious or unconscious, are energy and pre-particles, too. Both can be seen and measured through brain imaging.

When the brain is taught to visually recognize emotional energy as just energy when it decodes perceptual impressions, unwanted emotional subconscious re-stimulation can decrease.

For example, when decoding a light impression of a cup that is like a cup used by an abusive older relative in one’s youth, the brain would select visual memories of the original cup to use in the visual decoding process. Like post it notes attached to a memo, negative and unwanted but experienced energies and pre-particles of the emotions of fear, anger, sadness, etc, would all fleet by unconsciously as attachments to the memory. These could be experienced, and even then, misunderstood as a part of the individual’s personality.

Ironically, we refer to people’s positive or negative, glass half-full or half-empty world views as their “outlooks”. This could be literally correct.

How To Positively Change Emotional Wellbeing Through Vision

If the brain uses the same memories but learns to “view” the energies of the emotions as just energies and particles (without adding or attaching the significances of fear, anger, sadness, etc.), which are irrelevant to decoding visual information, the emotional information is not felt, even unconsciously.

This may seem impossible, but it is already being accomplished by scientists through brain imaging. The brain’s emotional centers, and even specific thoughts are being seen as energy. However, the scientists and doctors have lack knowledge of the actual specific content of the thoughts – but they can see the energy of the thoughts in brains.

It is also being accomplished through a new form of art, Post Conceptual UnGraven Image, founded by artist and author Judy Rey Wasserman. The brain can be taught to see more energy through specific visual images that purposefully use strokes to symbolize energy, which form pictures, just as traditional artists form imagery. This gives the brain a way to create and accumulate visual memories with information it previously lacked, but which human eyes are capable of perceiving.

Discovering “Bible Eyes” AKA Shomor Vision

Frequent exposure and looking at these works of Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art has changed the way some people see. The new vision change has been described as “seeing more energies.”  

One collector of Judy Rey Wasserman’s art calls it: seeing with “Bible Eyes”.  Judy Rey refers to it as “Shomor Vision,’ which is both a play on the words “show more” and the Jewish concept of shomer, which means to watchover, like a watchman.

Those who experience Bible Eyes or Shomer Vision have repeatedly looked at the UnGraven Image artworks with the understanding that although the images are seem recognizable, for instance a landscape or portrait, what is actually depicted are strokes that are the letters of the words of God, the tiniest energies or pre-particles that are the basis for the physical universe. This new understanding via art becomes new visual memories that our brains can apply to whatever is seen wherever and whenever it is seen.

Since sixty percent (60%) of the average person’s brain is allocated to the perception of sight, lowering the number of ongoing memories of negative or unwanted emotions offers a great deal of relief!

That leaves 40% for other functions and senses. We cannot control those senses at all without some external intervention. For instance, we cannot turn up the volume, or turn off what we are listening to, without the aid of some device. We cannot control what direction the scent we are smelling comes from. Similarly, if near to one side of us is rotting garbage, and directly at our other side is a bed of roses, we cannot turn our sense of smell away from the garbage and towards the roses. If a man hates the taste of garlic, he cannot choose not to taste the garlic in an otherwise delicious spaghetti sauce.

Genesis Dalet by Judy Rey Wasserman

Genesis Dalet Sunset by Judy Rey Wasserman

Strokes are the original Torah font Hebrew letters of Genesis 1-2:7. See close ups of the strokes and more at https://artofseeingthedivine.com/product/genesis-dalet-sunset/

What is the only one of our senses that we can naturally consciously control?

The only one of our senses that we can consciously control is vision. We can control what direction we look – or don’t look. Ironically, one of the unheralded benefits of most meditative practices happen when the practitioner closes his or her eyes. This effectively ceases all visual stimulation or decoding of impressions of light, and therefore no emotional memories are brought into the experience this way. Of course, a person may remember images or envision at will, but once a person’s eyes are closed any outside visual stimulation ceases.

We are so stimulated by what we visually perceive that we need to close our eyes to sleep. Again, without some sort of external aid, like ear plugs, we cannot turn off any other sense.

We are just beginning to discover the benefits of additional conscious control of our thoughts (and memories) through purposefully creating new and specifically different visual memories through art.

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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10th Sep 2021

How to Transform the Way You See Divine

Change your vision to change your life series

By Judy Rey Wasserman

We maneuver through our days based upon how we perceive the physical reality around us. The sense of vision is the basic go-to form of perception for the majority of people. A quick search on Google shows that 65% of people are primarily visual learners – a “percentage fact” that is disputed, but it could be an even larger percentage.

Sighted people rely on their visual perception to recognize or affirm:

  • Who and/or what is in their immediate vicinity
  • What is happening around them
  • Where they are
  • What time of day it is
  • How they of those around them are feeling, how they are accomplishing tacks, and even how to proceed with further action

If you noticed that the above bullet point list is formed using the who, what, where, when and how of journalism (news casting), you are correct.  Much of our information, even when spoken through radio, podcast or talking head newscast show, has it basis in how people visually perceive.  Even so, the oft repeated “one picture is worth a thousand words” results in illustrations or videos of events – or products – preferred by viewers and buyers.

Our eyes are only capable of seeing impressions of light. Our brains decode the impressions received from the eyes by comparing it to other previous impressions of light. We see through our memories. The more similar memories we have the easier it is to “see” (recognize) who or what is before us.

Along with our visual memories come remembrances that seemed significant, or at lease somehow useful information pertaining to those memories. These “attached” memories can include perceptions by other senses, plus value-based ideas and decisions. For instance, looking at a photo of a favorite food can evoke memories of smell, taste and even ouch, including the food’s temperature. A simple photograph can also bring memories of previous ideas and decisions about that food, such as it is a favorite, it is good, a heathy food, a fattening food, and even decisions by the viewer about the happiness consuming the food will generate.

You probably have a favorite food. Perhaps, you call it a comfort food.

Pause for a moment a picture one of your favorite foods in your mind. Image its taste, its scent and feel. Is it salty or sweet? Crisp, chewy, or soft – or a combination? Served hot, warm, room temperature or cold? Imagine that you are tasting this food right now. Give yourself enough time enjoying your food imagining, and then continue reading.

To create the previous food imagining you used your perceptual memories of experiences involving that food.

Conceptual artists aim to provoke thoughts and memories, by using the viewer’s visual perception. Word Art is a form of Conceptual Art. Word art is a form of Conceptual Art that uses words to provoke images and ideas.

Let’s do a visual memory changing art exercise using a Word art experience to inspire change in how you see the divine.

The word “divine”, D-i-V-i-N-E contains two i letters, which was specifically emphasized in the way it was just written. See them?

There is a kind of homonym type sound-alike between the name of the letter i and the word eye. When spoken their names match.

The play of sounds in English — eye and aye are pronounced the same — adds another level of positive or affirmative information.

Between those two ieyes is a letter V.  Thus: i V i

If we slightly raise the i letters to towards the top-of-the-line height and turn the i letters 45 degrees counterclockwise, we get:

We maneuver through our days based upon how we perceive the physical reality around us. The sense of vision is the basic go-to form of perception for the majority of people. A quick search on Google shows that 65% of people are primarily visual learners – a “percentage fact” that is disputed, but it could be an even larger percentage.

Sighted people rely on their visual perception to recognize or affirm:

  • Who and/or what is in their immediate vicinity
  • What is happening around them
  • Where they are
  • What time of day it is
  • How they of those around them are feeling, how they are accomplishing tacks, and even how to proceed with further action

If you noticed that the above bullet point list is formed using the who, what, where, when an how of journalism (news casting), you are correct.  Much of our information, even when spoken through radio, podcast or talking head newscast show, has it basis in how people visually perceive.  Even so, the oft repeated “one picture is worth a thousand words” results in illustrations or videos of events – or products –preferred by viewers and buyers.

Our eyes are only capable of seeing impressions of light. Our brains decode the impressions received from the eyes by comparing it to other previous impressions of light. We see through our memories. The more similar memories we have the easier it is to “see” (recognize) who or what is before us.

Along with our visual memories come remembrances that seemed significant, or at lease somehow useful information pertaining to those memories. These “attached” memories can include perceptions by other senses, plus value-based ideas and decisions. For instance, looking at a photo of a favorite food can evoke memories od smell, taste and even ouch, including the food’s temperature. A simple photograph can also bring memories of previous ideas and decisions about that food, such as it is a favorite, it is good, a heathy food, a fattening food, and even decisions by the viewer about the happiness consuming the food will generate.

You probably have a favorite food. Perhaps, you call it a comfort food.

Pause for a moment a picture one of your favorite foods in your mind. Image its taste, its scent and feel. Is it salty or sweet? Crisp, chewy, or soft – or a combination? Served hot, warm, room temperature or cold? Imagine that you are tasting this food right now. Give yourself enough time enjoying your food imagining, and then continue reading.

To create the previous food imagining you used your perceptual memories of experiences involving that food.

Conceptual artists aim to provoke thoughts and memories, by using the viewer’s visual perception. Word Art is a form of Conceptual Art. Word art is a form of Conceptual Art that uses words to provoke images and ideas.

Let’s do a visual memory changing art exercise using a Word art experience to inspire change in how you see the divine.

The word “divine”, D-i-V-i-N-E contains two i letters, which was specifically emphasized in the way it was just written. See them?

There is a kind of homonym type sound-alike between the name of the letter i and the word eye. When spoken their names match.

The play of sounds in English — eye and aye are pronounced the same — adds another level of positive or affirmative information.

Between those two ieyes is a letter V.  Thus: i V i

If we slightly raise the i letters to towards the top-of-the-line height and turn the i letters 45 degrees counterclockwise, we get:

Step 1

The letter V kind of looks like a cartoony, doodle, or emoji type nose.

 It looks even more like a simple depiction of a now if we move the dots of the turned 45 degrees i-eyes to below the center of them.  

The letter V kind of looks like a cartoony, doodle, or emoji type nose.

 It looks even more like a simple depiction of a now if we move the dots of the turned 45 degrees i-eyes to below the center of them.  

Step 2

When this new look becomes a Word Art image it looks like this:

DIVINE i’s by Judy Rey Wssserman

The Word Art that is shown about can be understood as portraying the Divine looking back at the viewer, at you.  The process of creating this Word Art is depicted on this blog so it is obvious that the Word “Devine” is shown. However, if the final artwork were appeared framed on a gallery wall, most viewers would readily recognize it as a unique portrayal of the word “Divine”.

In the process, or even merely by seeing the completed Word Art you have new and different experiences and visual memories of the word: Divine. A new layer of meaning has been added to the visual written word itself. You can see the word in a new, and hopefully for me, the artist, a inspiring way. Your perception of the reality of the word Divine has a new additional memory level of meaning. Visually perceiving in a new way is always life transforming.

* * *

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image.

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at Click: ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish.Click: https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by Judy Rey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Art Theory & Show Reviews, Bible Art, Vision & Science Comments No Comments »

11th May 2012

Can a Painting Depict Your Mind?

Can a painting show a mind — including your mind– at a moment of inspiration?

A sunset can be understood to represent a moment of inspiration and creation, as thoughts are actually things since they have mass and energy and can be measured.

Although in our culture we often comment that “the dawn has broken”, sunsets represent that idea more realistically. We tend to gain new, inspiring ideas or understandings, which are then followed by a period of germination and rest. The dawn can be understood as a kind of time of fulfillment when the new ideas and understandings become real and actionable.

For example, Jane and Joe have been thinking about creating an online way to add to their income. One day, Jane’s potato peeler breaks. She fashions a makeshift one from the old peeler and a tool she uses to sew with, which works better tan any potato peeler she ever had. John comes into the kitchen and sees her using her homemade peeler. He has a Eureka! of sunset moment when he quickly recognizes that if they get a patent and then manufacture this unique new peeler the may make a fortune– or at least enough to be able to quit their day jobs. Jane is also inspired by his vision for their future.

And then the sun sets on Jane and Joe. To fulfill their vision of their new future profitably selling potato peelers they must navigate through a less bright time, even a darker time, when they rest on their idea and also, behind the scenes perfect their prototype, patent it, discover how to manufacture their peeler in a cost effective way, and then deal with marketing, setting up distribution channels and dealing with order taking, shipping, advertising, etc. Joe and Jane have a lot of work to do, which will take time, before the dawn breaks and they can begin to reap the rewards (financial profit) from their idea.

In the Bible, a sunset is always a new beginning. This is true beginning with Genesis 1 and for all of Christendom continues to include the sunset death of Jesus, because that is really a new beginning.

The sunsets that I paint using Genesis 1-2:7 as strokes are always depicting a moment of inspiration, a new idea. As such they can be visually understood as symbolizing a mind at a moment of unique inspiration.

The shadows and darker trees, bushes, signs, windmills, etc., are a part of the structure that leads to or is a part of the new idea. For instance, all inventors have had to deal with the realities of the physical universe. The Wright brothers, Edison, Einstein saw the reality of the laws of the physical universe in a new way, and thus the previously seemingly impossible “miracles” of flight, light bulbs and atomic power are now common to us.

Many of the paintings in my Genesis: Sunrise-Sunset series have “frames” painted around the image area, which are often golden. They are placed a bit inside the background color, which then surrounds the outside of the frame. Sometimes the frame seems to hover within the edge of the image so the image continues past the painted frame. Why are they painted this way?

Watermill Sunset by Judy Rey Wasserman

Strokes: Genesis 1-2:7,Deut. 6:4, Psalm 18 frame

See larger version, available print and more information:  CLICK HERE

We “frame” our reality with our understandings, beliefs and prayers. Saying this another way, we know what we know, what we have been taught that we accept, what we believe because of experience, and what we can hope for as we can imagine it becoming reality.

For each of us individually and for society as a whole, there is much more beyond what we recognize or envision.

We are held in the boundaries unconscious and unexamined beliefs are often in conflict with other ideas that we have chosen intellectually, but struggle to make real on an emotional or deeper soul level. When confronted with the perception of a new reality, we sometimes use denial, until we can filter and process the new reality.

The gold of the frames denotes the outer boundaries where we are stretching to grow and encompass more understanding. The gold in the frames also symbolizes Prayer (hopes, affirmations, visualization, positive thinking by other names) as it helps us to create new and better beliefs, to believe in new possibilities for ourselves and others. Praying encourages our ability to consciously choose a new reality. When we pray for someone who is ill to recover we are acknowledging the illness, just by the very act of praying for recovery, since no one prays for the very healthy to recover. By praying we are visualizing the healing we want to occur.

For example, when Jane and Joe were first standing in their kitchen delighted with their bold idea for a new business, they affirmed that vision, and discussed the future that they could imagine, which was then framed by the knowledge and beliefs that they then had about starting a business. However, as they moved forward, their understandings and experience about how to create their business expanded. During times of stress, as they create their business they most likely will pray, or at least strongly hope for some “luck”.

Frames are usually created from the words of psalms, because psalms are prayers. Our reality is created by our beliefs and memories. We base our prayers, and our wants and hopes on these understandings. These beliefs may or may not be consciously held or chosen.

Prayer (affirmations, visualization, positive thinking by other names) helps us to create new and better beliefs, to believe in new possibilities for ourselves and others. Praying encourages our ability to consciously choose a new reality. When we pray for someone who is ill to recover we are acknowledging the illness, just by the very act of praying for recovery, since no one prays for the very healthy to recover. By praying we are visualizing the healing we want to occur.

By my reckoning, our prayers reach further into the ultimate, into the spiritual realms or heavens than any of our other thoughts or communications, since by the very act of being in prayer, which means communication, we are furthering our alignment with The Divine. The frames are in the paintings to depict and remind us that we consciously or unconsciously create the boundaries of our reality with our beliefs and that we are always able to reach The Divine, even when The Divine seems to be as far away as the edge of reality.

Dock Less Traveled by Judy Rey Wasserman

Strokes: Genesis 1-2:7,Deut. 6:4, Psalm 19 frame

 

* * *

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

Posted by Posted by judyrey under Filed under Art & Inspiration, Bible Art, Vision & Science Comments No Comments »

19th Oct 2011

Inspiration Happens Only Now

A good work of art is original.

Not necessarily an original – since personally, I’d take a good reproduction of a van Gogh, Rembrandt, Monet, etc., over some of the “originals” I have seen recently in various galleries.

By original, I mean that the artist’s vision is unique and inspiring.

There is a great deal of good art, beautifully rendered work being done today. I know artists who have talent and training and they paint lovely paintings using oils and watercolors, especially. Just one problem, been there seen that. Who is painting what is really new and will change the way I see the world? I want to see that.

A good life is original. Each person has his or her own path. Attempting to follow another’s path only manages to take one off one’s own path.

It’s an interesting thing about paths. We can only take the next step. We cannot undo past steps, but we can correct our course if we have rambled off our path. But, a path is walked one step at a time. Try to run ahead and one goes off one’s path.

A step takes time, even though it may seem to go rather fast, such as during a brisk walk.

Imagine a step shown in slow motion. It happens second by second, bit by bit, movement by movement: the lifting up of the leg, leaning forward, the shifting of one’s weight… It’s an easy accomplishment for the average healthy person, but for a baby becoming a toddler or a person who has a foot or leg injury it takes more concentration. The time seems to stretch out. Taking a simple step demands focus and being present.

No one can walk with The Divine in the past. Nor is it possible to do so in the future. All we have is now.

The Divine is always present in the Now. It is our challenge to let go of our past baggage, worries, concerns, unresolved emotional difficulties with others, anger, and what ever else is running through our minds – and take the bold step of focusing on the immediate now.

Take a deep breath. Concentrate on just breathing in then breathing out. Experience that breath. Look around. What do you see? Not what needs to be done – but what is actually where you are? What is now? (Please, give it a try — now.)

This blog was inspired by a Collector Family member who wrote me that she is having a problem staying in balance. She is very busy with a life that places many demands on her time.

Being out of balance means not being in the moment of now with the Lord. Even busy people only have now, although it may seem otherwise.

Jesus said, “I do nothing but what the Father does through me.” That’s about being in the Now and focused on the Father.

Deuteronomy 6: 5-7 commands a daily ongoing relationship, in the Now, “5. And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might. 6 And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: 7 And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. “

Echoing this, in the Christian Testament, Paul said, “Pray without ceasing” — meaning be in communication as prayer is communication that goes both ways. Paul is taking about a constant relationship with The Divine that can only happen in the now.

My life is very out of balance in the way of the world. Experts might disapprove of my path. That’s their problem. I am focusing on staying on my path.

I am working to stay, moment by moment, step by step on the path that the Lord has for me.  Sure, I fail on a daily basis. I stumble, trip and even take spiritual pratfalls. I get lost in my thoughts of the path and future. Then I pick myself up, brush myself off and get my focus back on The Divine and what is now. I ask, What do I do now, Lord? I ask this as often as I can remember to do so, many, many times a day and I have been at it for years. What do I do now? What do I say now? There is always an answer, just not necessarily the one I want. And it is always simple and immediate, dealing with the now.

Most of us ask for guidance during times of crisis. I have learned to ask on an ongoing basis, even when I think I can handle the situation myself. On a moment to moment basis and more of my moments are spent that way. You can do this too.

We can only relate to The Divine (or anyone) in the moment of NOW. We cannot do it in the future or past.

When I have my answer, and act on it, such as late and night, when I get the sense of inspirational feedback, like, Go brush your teeth … then when I break away from the painting or the PC screen, I have a sense of balance of peace of being on my right path. (The teeth brushing thing is generally followed with the move towards bed.)

When I am busy with the many tasks that I wish I could give to the staff I don’t have yet, I try to be present in that now, focus on The Divine. Moment by moment. Easy to say, not as easy to accomplish.

For instance, putting together my shipments of prints is a task that is routine but uniquely specific in detail for each package. It is work I could mostly and gladly hand over to a competent assistant. However, it is still my own task and I have learned that there is nothing so mundane or small that the Lord does not wish to be there with you and share it.

A great painting is created one stroke at a time. The inspiration (for me communication with The Divine) that the artist had when each stroke was made shows in a painting. A great symphony is written note by note and again, the inspiration is evident. A great piece of literature… well, you have the idea.

Great works of art out continue to inspire many generations and so seem immortal.

If we live our lives one moment at a time with the Lord, we will live great lives that will inspire others. That is what Jesus, Paul, Hillel and many other great teachers have tried to tell us. In Genesis , it says that Enoch walked perfectly with The Divine and then was no more – in other words, Enoch never died. I find that amazingly inspirational.

Inspirational enough to inspire me to create a whole new theory of art, Post Conceptual UnGraven Image, where the focus is on the stroke: tiny strokes – one stroke at a time in the ever expanding and inspirational now.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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16th Aug 2011

Essence and Time in Portraits

The best-known painting in the world is a portrait.

For great portrait painters, the challenge is to create a portrait that shows the paradox of the eternal essence of a person in a fleeting but immediate moment on the edge of transforming into a new facet of the eternal self.

The portrait shows a unique moment of the present: the now – and some of the best portraits ever seem to catch their subject’s mid action, or at least about to inhale or exhale. The best portraits also imply the past simultaneously with the future.

The implied future in every portrait leads to another paradox involving the duality of life and death. To fully paint a person in a moment of life, the shadows of age and death always encroach the work as before the portrait is complete, the subject has aged.

A great portrait is not necessarily a perfect likeness, nor one that can be used to promote an agenda of fostering a person’s position in life, as historically most portraits are.

Every president of the United States had his portrait painted.  These paintings are on view at the White House and on its web site. We learn to recognize the earlier presidents, Washington, Jefferson, the Adams, etc., from their painted portraits. Since Abraham Lincoln, most people are more familiar with the photographic images (including movie and video images) than with their official portraits.

At the turn of the last century, having a black and white portrait taken by a photographer was a significant event. The portrait was cherished and passed down to family members.  In many families portraits continue to be passed down providing a rare record for current and future generations.

Photographic portraits, including videos and film of people, bombard us through print, TV, film, email, our phones, T-Shirts, mugs, billboards, etc. We see images of people we know, people we don’t know and people we think we somehow know (like celebrities) and people who are not even people, are fictional characters. We humans seem to never tire of seeing images of ourselves and others, as the people who create magazine covers and advertising executives know well.

Yet, the traditional painted portrait or sculpted bust continues, partially as a status symbol as it has been a hallmark of the rich and powerful since antiquity. Since ancient times, this kind of portrait has been one that is usually somewhat idealized, showing the prominence and often might of the subject. Successful pharaohs, emperors, kings, queens, CEOs all learned how to use the power of their own selected image to present themselves to gain and keep authority.

Alexander the Great used imposing heroic statues of his image and placed his portraits on coins to control and foster his vast conquered empire. With the exception of the portrait of John F. Kennedy, all of the portraits present their subjects as leaders of a great country and are posed, showing a static moment where the subject is presented at his best.

Artists have painted themselves, their family and friends in more realistic or certainly less than heroic portraits since the Renaissance. They also painted images of people who were less than heroic in dramatic paintings that dealt with historic or mythical scenes. However, creating portraits that were less than flattering and unusual in their approach for any notable subject really begins with the emergence of photography.

Photography readily captures a physical likeness. The mechanical camera has a greater chance of accuracy as to proportions shadings and color relationships. Andy Warhol, who was trying to remove the artist and make his art somewhat as a machine, understood this.

The accuracy of photography encouraged artists to create portraits that revealed the personality and the reality of the person in the moment.

We are always in a state of being and becoming simultaneously, as one moment of being flows into the next. We are always transforming into who we are at the next moment.

One of the first and for me one of the best, portraits of is that new era is Monet’s Camille Monet on her Deathbed. Monet, a master of catching the fleeting light, paints a transcending moment of a woman transforming from one moment into another. Although she is dying, barely present and seen as if in a mist, Monet manages to suggest the recently vibrant and young woman his wife was.

Van Gogh, who knew Monet and quite possibly had seen this painting before he moved to the South of France, paints two pictures that revolutionize modern and contemporary portraiture. He paints Vincent’s Chair with His Pipe and Gauguin’s Armchair. There insightful portraits of the two men, their painting styles, colors and occupations show van Gogh’s perception of the differences between them, although he is kinder to Gauguin than himself. But, van Gogh never created a really flattering self-portrait.

Like Monet, van Gogh is capturing a moment in time, which definitely points both to the past and future of himself and Gauguin. On van Gogh’s empty chair his pipe is in the process of being filled, while Gauguin’s empty chair holds a lit candle and two books. Each man’s chair is askew, as if push back and aside during a hasty and unplanned exit. As such, they are slightly turned away from each other, not companionably side by side nor facing each other for discourse.

Psalm 113 (Vincent van Gogh)

By Judy Rey Wasserman

Vincent van Gogh’s pair of chair paintings can be understood as a precursor to conceptual art portraits. They have inspired many Modern and Contemporary portrait artists to create portraits where the image of the person may be unseen, but the person referenced is unmistakable. An excellent and relevant example of contemporary portraiture is Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party, where the plates and dinnerware depict the essence of the renowned women while the chairs are not just empty but missing!

Picasso abstracted the images of the people, often his mistresses and wives, in his portraits, revealing more sides of their physicality and personality. Even when the subject seems posed, she seems to be in motion, the subject’s past and future, which often seems to include sexual encounters, is implied.

Andy Warhol managed to obtain commissions for portraits that were not essentially flattering of their subjects. Many of his subjects were not then famous (but they were paying!) so he would take photographs and then turn his selected images into silk-screened images and paintings.

Warhol’s work challenged the school of portraiture where the wealthy and renowned pose for a static, flattering, possibly imposing portrait that promotes their power and authority and even wealth. Instead, Warhol abstracts and simplifies the features of his subjects into black planes that are “enhanced” by and placed with fields of bright, even garish color. He takes his simplified black image and stamps it in row upon row of a canvas, changing the colors, altering the look and hence the time behind the ever-unchanging image, creating icons that are both of there time and without real time, eternal and fleeting.

 

Psalm 19 (Andy Warhol)

Double Un-Denied

By Judy Rey Wasserman

Warhol’s greatness as a portrait artist is proven by the fact that when we recall most recent presidents we think of moving and still photographic images. However, more of us know what Mao Zedong looked like from one of Warhol’s portraits than from the many photographs of him. Of course, by simplifying the images of Mao that were meant to inspire respect, recognition and even awe, Warhol made him very human and far less imposing and about as much a figure of perfect leadership as Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe.

Andy Warhol was well acquainted with the work of the painter who created the portrait that was the best-known painting in the world then and remains so now. That work does not glorify its subject, although it probably was a commissioned work, but simply presents a human being. Warhol seems to have revered this artist since he appropriated from that artist’s work in some of his own later paintings.

It seems that when essential identity is revealed in a portrait, the fleeting eternal, which implies references to a fleeting past and future are inherently depicted, but when a subject is posed and the portrait flatters special qualities, the element of time becomes static, a mere advertisement for the image the patron and artist seek to present.

Those imposing, flattering portraits may be beautiful and skillfully present an excellent likeness of individuals and we may be impressed. Their splendor decorates museums, stately homes and board rooms. But, we do not love them. We do not travel to see them, put them on our mugs, shirts, posters and address books. They fail to communicate to us the way the portraits by artists such as Rembrandt, Monet, van Gogh, Picasso and da Vinci do.

The best-known painting in the world is a portrait: the Mona Lisa. Da Vinci depicts a lady, looking at us but clearly thinking of something else, he captures the movement of her thought and in doing so we look and wait expecting her to breathe in or out or even blink. It is a painting of paradox of the eternal essence of a person in a fleeting but immediate moment at the edge of transforming into a new facet of her eternal self. Time and identity are brilliantly portrayed, and we are intrigued and inspired.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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10th May 2011

Did Leonardo da Vinci Envision Post Conceptual Art?

Does Leonardo da Vinci’s turn of the 14th Century Mona Lisa presage the turn of the century 21 st Century Post Conceptual Art theory of Judy Rey Wasserman?

For centuries it has been widely agreed that Leonardo Da Vinci was a genius and one of the greatest artists who ever lived. Like many of the other greatest artists he developed a technique and artistic understanding that was new. His is known as sfumato.

Art historians and professors point to the Mona Lisa as one of the best examples of sfumato. In addition, the portrait is cited for her eyes that seem to follow the viewer while her expression seems to change from into a mysterious smile.  The Mona Lisa is the best recognized and most famous painting in the world.

In addition to being an artist, Leonardo da Vinci is well known as a scientist, inventor and lover of codes.

In 2003, American artist Judy Rey Wasserman developed and founded UnGraven Image Art theory using strokes that are alpha-numeric, phonic and binary symbols (Torah font symbols) to represent the strings of elementary physics. Of course, for all Christians and Jews, this refers to Genesis 1, where basic theology says that the letters of the words of the Lord God are the essences of the physical universe. [Note to see the amazing correlations between Torah font and physics’ theory watch the You Tube video, Painting with the Big Bang of Genesis”]

UnGraven Image Art theory widened into Post Conceptual Art theory, which includes using any type of symbol(s) for strokes. The art theory is the first one that focuses on the stroke and its meaning rather that the image or design it creates. Since the strokes are used traditionally, meaning they overlap or are used as glazes, or shaded, etc., the paintings cannot be read. Thus the intrinsic meanings of the symbol-strokes are not decipherable but obscured as a kind of hidden code.

In December 2010, Italy ‘s National Committee for Cultural Heritage announced that hidden Roman alpha-numeric symbols were discovered in the eyes of the Mona Lisa.

“To the naked eye the symbols are not visible, but with a magnifying glass they can clearly be seen,” said Committee President and art historian Silvano Vinceti. “In the right eye appear to be the letters  LV which could well stand for his name Leonardo Da Vinci, while in the left eye there are also symbols, but they are not as defined,” he said. “It is very difficult to make them out clearly but they appear to be the letters CE or it could be the letter B. You have to remember the picture is almost 500 years old so it is not as sharp and clear as when first painted.”

More symbols were discovered in the three-arched bridge which appears over the left shoulder of the portrait the number 72 or an L and a 2 can also be found.

Historical records show that the three-arched bridge, known as the Ponte Gobbo or Ponte Vecchio (the Old Bridge ), was swept away when the River Trebbia burst its banks. “Leonardo added in the number 72 beneath the bridge to record the devastating flood of the River Trebbia and to allow it to be identified,” said art historian Carla Glori, who sets out the theory in a new book, The Leonardo Enigma.

Da Vinci was keen on symbols and codes to get messages across, and he wanted us to know the identity of the model using the eyes, which he believed were the door to the soul and a means for communication.

“It’s remarkable that no one has noticed these symbols before, and from the preliminary investigations we have carried out we are confident they are not a mistake and were put there by the artist,” da Vinci said.

Genesis Aleph by Judy Rey Wasserman

Strokes = Letters of Genesis 1-2:7

Like da Vinci, Wasserman also holds that the eyes are a door to the soul, “A door is a two way opening, what the eyes see also go directly to the brain. Art is visual communication that can change our lives. Great art expands our visual vocabulary and the way we see the world.”

While Dan Brown’s best selling book and movie, The Da Vinci Code asserts that there are hidden messages in Da Vinci’s work, those messages were thought to be shown as images not letters or numbers concealed within the art or used as strokes.

Although a 50 year old book found in a musty used book stack in an antiques shop led the experts from Italy ‘s National Cultural Heritage committee to investigate the Mona Lisa for hidden symbols their findings and proofs were not made public until December 2010, over seven years after Wasserman founded her theory.

“I wish I could credit da Vinci’s work for inspiring this new twenty-first century art, but really it owes more to my childhood misunderstanding of van Gogh’s strokes as Morse Code, which I cannot read, plus my idea of visually presenting the Genesis 1 theology in relation to elementary physics,” said Wasserman. “Plus of course, Post Conceptual Art is a next step from Conceptual Art, especially Word Art. That is inherent in its name.”

Da Vinci visualized or invented so many of the possibilities made real in the past 100 years such as helicopter-like flying machines, parachutes, armored vehicles, machine guns,  calculators, a rudimentary theory of  plate tectonics and concentrated  solar power.  Now we know he can add one more presaged idea:  painting with unseen symbols as strokes to create an image, which is Post Conceptual Art.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself. See more or yourself. Discover the art of Judy Rey Wasserman’s UnGraven Image. at ungravenimage.com.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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06th Feb 2009

New Post Conceptual Art Produces Vision Change and Relief from Unwanted Emotions

Looking at Judy Rey Wasserman’s new Post Conceptual UnGraven Image art has recently been discovered to physically change one’s vision so more energy can be seen. This new Awakened Vision then promotes relief from of unwanted negative emotions as the brain shifts to decode emotions and thought memories as energy rather than feelings and content. The transformation is based on recent discoveries in neuroscience. Additional special Visual Exercise/Experiences that use the new art are now available in a book to help accelerate the attainment of this new Awakened Vision.

Judy Rey Wasserman discovered that artwork created with her emerging theory of Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art has an amazing effect on vision and emotional clarity.

“Art can change lives,” says Judy Rey, “But I never expected the actual visual perceptual increase and then the relief from memories of past emotions and thoughts that occurs from my works.”

To help people speed up the process of acquiring these results, Wasserman, whose professional background includes careers as a both a professional writer and counselor, wrote a book, The Art of Seeing The Divine—Book 1: What Do You See? Currently available in e book format, it includes a series of Visual Exercise/Experiences, which use her artwork to turn the book into a personal seminar experience. It is available for immediate download at artofseeingthedivine.com.

Law of the Lord is Perfect, 2008
Acrylic and watercolor on canvas
Available through the Kezsler Gallery

According the ungravenimage.com web site, Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory creates images using strokes that are symbols to represent the strings (energy) of elementary physics, which are the essential building blocks of the universe.

The idea to use symbols as strokes came from basic theology held by all branches and denominations of Christians and Jews; the letters of the words spoken in Genesis by the Creator are the essences of the universe. Judy Rey’s strokes come from the only set of symbols in the world that are alpha-numeric, phonic and binary: Torah font. Binary means that the symbols reference many important concepts in science, plus duality understandings in most of the world’s religions and paths. It’s a vision we can all share.

This new vision of actually seeing more energy is called Awakened Vision.

Recent discoveries in neuroscience explain why the art and visual techniques work. When people look at Post Conceptual UnGraven Image artworks their brains automatically create visual memories of the world as energy. After a person acquires enough of these memories the brain, which is responsible for ninety percent of the perception of vision, decodes the impressions of light received from the eyes to include the new perception of these energies. If you have ever seen someone or something and thought, that reminds me of… you are aware of the decoding process, which usually occurs subconsciously.

Most normal people’s eyes already see this energy, but the brain has no way to compare or contrast these impressions to decode them. As a person sees with Awakened Vision on a regular basis, the brain acquires more and more visual memories of energy.

With enough memories of Awakened Vision the brain begins to change the way it decodes thoughts and emotions that are associated with visual memories. It decodes them as energy, which scientifically is measurably what they are.

Showmore Vision produces a shift in the brain to an objective recognition of emotional memories and thoughts as energy, rather than a subjective meaning (such as feelings or thoughts of worthlessness). This makes unwanted emotions and reactions seem to “disappear”. A person simply feels better, clearer and is able to better focus and experience more success in life.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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02nd Sep 2008

Post Conceptual Art’s Truth of Time and Energy

Using symbols for strokes to create visual imagery, Post Conceptual Art closely emulates both cutting edge scientific and ancient spiritual truths.

Art is humankind’s way of showing truth. Artistic truth may be profane or sacred or both. The best art reveals an understanding of truth that is not blatantly obvious, until through the artist’s hand it becomes so. From the cave art of the shamans to current day Conceptual and now the new Post Conceptual Art, the work of the artist has been to convey truth visually.

If the truth conveyed is valid to a large enough proportion of its contemporary society that has the means to support it, the art is accepted and revered in its own time. If the truth is valid for many people and continues to be so for many generations then the art is venerated. This is true for all forms of art.

Visual art stands apart from the other arts through its relationship to time. Performances, including theatrical, musical and dance, plus films, video and literature need time to be revealed. Even the shortest poem cannot present its meaning all at once. However, a painting or sculpture immediately presents as a whole complete work. One may wish to spend more time visually exploring the work and thinking about it, but the viewer not the artist is adding to the understanding of any purely visual handmade artwork.

Time is also referenced in a purely visual handcrafted work as the viewer “perceives” the kind of time it took to physically create the work. Most purely visual hand made art is created with strokes of one kind or another. In Contemporary Art the strokes may be made of almost anything, including Tara Donavan’s buttons and straws to the snip strokes of Kara Walker’s scissors. Historically the strokes we are most familiar with are those made with paint brushes and chisels.

Fabricated and photographic art (which is fabricated thorough the initial use of a camera and then often developed via other machinery) also uses strokes, but the relationship to time differs. Each frame or photograph was captured all-at-once in a moment of time, and thus is one stroke. A stroke always references the smallest unit of time it took to make the whole stroke.

Physicists tell us that our dimension of the physical universe began with the Big Bang, which set in motion the ongoing expanding creation of energy. Everything we perceive is really energy because matter is energy in denser accumulation. For the Abrahamic faiths, and those traditions of other peoples, too, the Creator speaks the physical universe (or world, depending on the story) into existence. For Jews, Christians and Muslims, the letters of the Hebrew words spoken by the Divine in Genesis 1, form the real or symbolic basis of the physical universe, and as they continue to be spoke the universe is created and continues. The similarity to the scientific theory and the spiritual tradition are easily seen; this has received much commentary in the press and in popular and scholarly non-fiction books.

Paintings inherently emulate both the Big Bang and the symbolic presentation of the Genesis story of creation. Like the Big Bang a painting begins with one stroke and the artist proceeds to add strokes to make a unified whole. Like the Genesis story, a painting begins with one stroke (letter of the first word of “Let there be Light”) and proceeds to include more strokes until the whole of the initial creation is completed.

The same understandings can be applied to hand made sculptures where an artist’s strokes may be made with a chisel or tool, or one’s hands, but stroke by stroke is made until the whole of the work is revealed.

Post Conceptual Art breaks with centuries of tradition to exclusively create narrative imagery with symbol-strokess that are used just as strokes have always been used by artists. Unlike calligraphy, micrography or Word Art where the symbols (letters) are meant to be distinguished or read, Post Conceptual Art asserts that the meaning of the symbol-strokes is inherent and need not be read. This references humankind’s daily experiences with the physical universe where we may recognize, name and use a compound without perceiving or even having knowledge of its atomic, or the molecular structure. For instance, we can distinguish copper from plastic or from water, without really perceiving the atomic, no less pre-particle energy that is inherent in any of the matter.

Until the Twentieth Century, humankind did not have scientific molecular or atomic understandings of the structure of any matter. In our new century the scientific frontiers of binary science and M or String theory (these are now fairly synonymous) are seeking to discover more about the tiniest pre-matter/energies that are the physical basis of our physical universe. The scientific discoveries and theories about these essential units of energy and mass are represented by the symbol-strokes of the Post Conceptual artist.

Thus Post Conceptual Art, in accordance with Judy Rey Wasserman’s “Manifesto of Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art Theory” presents cutting edge scientific truth in visual form. That using symbols (letters) as strokes to represent the creation as presented in the Abrahamic faiths and many others, possibly indicates how eternally relevant this now scientific truth is.

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J

Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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20th Jun 2008

Science of Vision and Art

Recent understandings in medical and neuroscience about how we see has tremendous importance for visual artists, and also anyone involved in the art world.

Vision is the primary perceptual sense for anyone who is not seriously vision impaired. Visual perception is so basic that it is the one sense we must shut off when we go to sleep.

The fact that we stand tall, gives us an advantage over most animals on the planet, which is how we developed our reliance and fairly well developed vision. Carnivorous flying birds also enjoy especially excellent eyesight, in some ways usually better than our own, especially birds who hunt at night such as owls or soar the highest, eagles and hawks.

All that our eyes actually perceive are light rays. Those eagle, hawk and owl eyes may perceive more light rays, but we still have better vision. Human beings can see more than any living creature on earth. Why?

Our human brains.

We have binoculars, telescopes, microscopes, infrared lenses and other inventions that allow us to see far beyond the capacity of our eyes, or those of the birds.

Each normally sighted individual had better functional vision based on his or her brain. One half of the back part of the human brain is devoted to the business of seeing. There are over one hundred billion nerve cells in the cortex, the area of the brain that most deals with sight.

As an artist this gives me a kind of job security. Visual art is never going to go out of fashion when half of a person’s brain is devoted to seeing!

Neuroscience has also recently discovered that a person’s brain can continue to grow and expand, make more connections, grow more cells throughout life. In relation to sight they have learned that when a person’s brain is injured, from a stroke, injury or operation that often over time the person can make new connections and that one area of the brain often takes over the former duties of the damaged or missing part.

Therapies, such as Vision Restoration Therapy, based on breakthroughs in neuroplacticity, help people learn how to see when parts of their brains that are necessary for full vision are compromised. Visual exercise for the brain can help create stronger brains and sight.

Medical advances have repaired eyes that were blind in adults who have been blind from birth or early childhood. After the first few operations, after the doctor removes the bandages, examined the patient and declared the operation to be a medical success, the family and friends of the patient gathered around so the patient could see them. Much to their dismay, the newly sighted patient still could not see them!

Although the formerly blind now had eyes, they had no information in their brains to compare the impressions of light that their eyes were receiving to, so they could decode those impressions into meaningful vision. The newly sighted only recognized who was in the room by their voices, being still functionally blind.

If you can read this text you have well trained and sophisticated eyesight, far more sophisticated than that of the majority of people who have lived on earth, just by the fact that you can recognize the different letters one fro another, and then their combinations into words, which you also differentiate.

There is a story, that I have heard in various ways, that seems to be true. Essentially a century or so ago, a missionary, or perhaps it was a doctor or doctor or anthropologist took the chief of a very primitive tribe on a special trip to a city to introduce “civilization”. They went to a museum or special traveling exhibit of famous realistic artists (probably Impressionism was too new to be included back then). The chief looked at the paintings, following his friend who marveled at the works. As they discussed the paintings it became apparent that the chief only saw bright colored stuff (paint). He had no idea that the paint created images, as that is a learned idea and experience. Only after the idea was shown to the chief did he begin to see the images and appreciate the art.

Now science tells us that the more art the chief saw the more experiences data his brain would collect, which would increase his ability to appreciate art. The connections in his brain would increase from his new visual experiences.

People who live in industrialized society where a steady stream of images from PCs, TVs, magazines, billboards, neon signs, images on cell phones, etc., are normal are developing visual vocabularies that allow them to understand visually transmitted information faster with greater depth of understanding than all previous generations.

Perhaps the art market remains booming not only because it is now fully international, but because people of wealth and/or education have a more developed visual sense than ever before, making visual art all the more relevant.

Since so much of the human brain is devoted to sight as it is the dominant sensory perception, and a healthy human brain can continue to make connections, create cells and hence “grow” during a person’s whole lifetime then a visual artist has opportunities, challenges and perhaps self-selected responsibilities beyond other kinds of artists. That humans vision is sighted humanity’s primary perceptual sense gives visual artists a better chance of inspiring and communicating with others, assuming the artist has talent, training and a vision (world view, spirituality, wisdom, etc.) to share and can make it accessible to others.

Great visual art was changing individual lives, including mine as a young girl growing up in NYC, prior to recent scientific discoveries about the way we see and how the brain works. Artists and art lovers knew that art could be meaningful and important; we just didn’t know that humans are especially wired to make visual experiences more relevant than any other kind.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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08th May 2008

Aha! Moment – Beginning to See the World in a New Way

My greatest Aha! Moment kind of crept in on me, and I continue to fall up into it.

It totally turned my life around. Aside from being a mother and now grandmother, it became my life’s mission. It changed the way that I actually see the world and as an artist, my mission is to share that vision so others can see the world in a more meaningful way, full of inspiration, possibilities and blessings.

Essentially, I experimented with the idea of using symbols for ever stroke in a painting. Artistically, it is a next step from Conceptual, especially Word Art.

However, the theology that this idea comes from is ancient, held by every branch and denomination of Christian and Jew (comes from Genesis 1), mentioned in the Koran, references concepts of duality important to Buddhism, Hinduism and the Tao, plus other paths. The idea is that when the Creator speaks the world into existence, the letters of those Words are (or represent) the essential building blocks of the physical universe.

Back when I was a teenager and then into my early twenties, when I was an art student, I had tried to create works that would show the atomic structures surrounding us, using images of molecules that I tried to form together to form an image, such as a landscape. I realized it would only work if I painted on a truly massive scale, works that were as large as multi-storied apartment or commercial buildings.

Still, I wanted to depict the smallest matter, now scientifically understood to be pre-matter energy called strings or branes in elementary physics. So, thinking of Pissarro and the Impressionists who worked to paint and show the light, one late summer day a few years ago I picked up my paintbrush began to show the energies that make up the physical matter of the world by using the original letters Bible texts for every stroke. My first painting was a small, 9 x 12 inches of a sunset over a mountain.

Like all artists, after a while of my painting experiment I stood back from the small painting to view the work. That’s when I had my Aha moment. It worked! There was definitely a sunset, but just as obviously there was something in the very strokes, their shapes, the way the overlapped that drew attention to their intrinsic importance. I was visually depicting how the energies (for some the words of God) create now and always the world.

I did not realize it then, but my life and every thing I had studied or done professionally was needed for my new mission, from my career as a writer, to creating and giving seminars, my acting training for TV and film, sales jobs, and of course, my work as a spiritual counselor.

There continue to be many more Aha! moments in this new way of creating art, a new theory that I am now actively founding and working in as an artist. For instance, I learned that most elementary physicists agree that there are 11 basic pre-matter strings in our dimension of the universe while their opposites (11 more) exist in other dimensions. When I discovered that Torah font Hebrew seems to be the only binary phonetic font in any of the world’s languages. And the font is binary it two ways: first every letter can be formed using one of more of two one-stroke letters, the yud or the vav; second, that every letter can easily be written with one or two strokes. I cannot do that with English, which is the language I speak. Having a binary font is important as the symbols always also reference important concepts and applications in science and mathematics, as well as spiritual concepts of duality. A phonetic font references the sound vibrations of both the Creator’s Words and physics’ strings.

So I am painting sound, music, energy and a new vision of how to see the world we can all share, whatever our beliefs or backgrounds. It has changed the way I see the world, including the dishes in the sink, the pile of laundry, the accident I pass on the road, etc. I have learned to “see” the energies, the words, everywhere, now and always – and the always present inspiration, possibilities and blessings.

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Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art at ungravenimage.com.

Post Conceptual UnGraven Image Art theory is based at the intersection of ancient spiritual wisdom and cutting-edge contemporary science. It shows us a new and enhanced spiritual and science-based way to see the world. It is a life changing vision that can even become an actual new way of seeing that is a fulfillment of biblical prophecy. Can this be true? See for yourself.

Check out the Fine Art Limited Edition prints, decorative prints, books, and printables that are currently available to you through Judy Rey’s Art of Seeing The Divine Shop. You don’t have to buy to avail yourself of the art and inspiration available there. However, if you select to collect investment quality archival art, or decorate your home with images created with strokes that are original letters from Bible texts, or buy a gift for someone special, there is a secure shopping cart that accepts most credit cards so your purchase is easy to accomplish. https://artofseeingthedivine.com.

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